Pablo Sandoval won't be arrested for sexual assault

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Pablo Sandoval won't be arrested for sexual assault

From Comcast SportsNet
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Investigators say there is not enough evidence to arrest San Francisco Giants slugger Pablo Sandoval for an alleged sexual assault at a hotel near Santa Cruz. The Santa Cruz County Sherriff's Office completed its investigation Thursday and forwarded the case to the district attorney's office. No charges are expected. A 21-year-old woman who lives in Santa Cruz County filed a sexual assault complaint against the All-Star third baseman June 1. The woman told investigators she met a small group of people in downtown Santa Cruz and went to a resort in nearby Aptos, where she said she was assaulted. Sandoval was contacted at the resort by detectives and cooperated in the investigation. Sandoval's attorney, Eric Geffon, had previously called the encounter a "consensual, personal relationship of a sexual nature." In a statement released Thursday, Geffon said: "The Sherriff's Department has completed a thorough and professional investigation and we are pleased that they have concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support an arrest. Pablo will continue to focus on helping the Giants towards a playoff run this season." The Giants have a major investment in the player nicknamed "Kung Fu Panda" for his powerful swing and portly presence. The switch-hitter received a 17.15 million, three-year contract last winter. He lost about 40 pounds through a strict workout regimen two offseasons ago to bring him down to around 240 pounds, then batted .315 with 23 home runs and 70 RBIs in 2011. Sandoval missed more than a month this season after he had surgery May 4 to remove a broken hamate bone in his left hand. He is batting .307 with eight home runs and 30 RBIs. Sandoval also made his second straight All-Star appearance and first as a starter this week. He hit the first bases-loaded triple in All-Star history off Detroit ace Justin Verlander to highlight a five-run first inning that propelled the National League to an 8-0 victory over the American League on Tuesday night. San Francisco is a half-game behind the rival Los Angeles Dodgers for first place in the NL West. The Giants return to play Friday at home against the Houston Astros.

MLB players' union agrees to pitchless intentional walks

MLB players' union agrees to pitchless intentional walks

NEW YORK - There won't be any wild pitches on intentional walks this season.

The players' association has agreed to Major League Baseball's proposal to have intentional walks without pitches this year.

"It doesn't seem like that big of a deal. I know they're trying to cut out some of the fat. I'm OK with that," Cleveland manager Terry Francona said.

While the union has resisted many of MLB's proposed innovations, such as raising the bottom of the strike zone, installing pitch clocks and limiting trips to the mound, players are willing to accept the intentional walk change.

"As part of a broader discussion with other moving pieces, the answer is yes," union head Tony Clark wrote Wednesday in an email to The Associated Press. "There are details, as part of that discussion, that are still being worked through, however."

The union's decision was first reported by ESPN .

"I'm OK with it. You signal. I don't think that's a big deal," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. "For the most part, it's not changing the strategy, it's just kind of speeding things up. I'm good with it."

There were 932 intentional walks last year, including 600 in the National League, where batters are walked to bring the pitcher's slot to the plate.

"You don't want to get your pitcher out of a rhythm, and when you do the intentional walk, I think you can take a pitcher out of his rhythm," Girardi said. "I've often wondered why you don't bring in your shortstop and the pitcher stand at short. Let the shortstop walk him. They're used to playing catch more like that than a pitcher is."

Agreement with the union is required for playing rules changes unless MLB gives one year advance notice, in which case it can unilaterally make alterations. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred expressed hope Tuesday that ongoing talks would lead to an agreement on other changes but also said clubs would reserve the right to act unilaterally, consistent with the rule-change provision of the sport's labor contract.

Some changes with video review can be made unilaterally, such as shortening the time to make a challenge.

"I know they were thinking about putting in a 30-second (limit) for managers to make a decision," Francona said. "I actually wish they would. I think it would hustle it up and if we can't tell in 30 seconds, maybe we shouldn't be doing it anyway."

Blakely: Jae Crowder is more than 'just another guy' on Celtics

Blakely: Jae Crowder is more than 'just another guy' on Celtics

As the NBA trade deadline gets closer and closer, A. Sherrod Blakely helps shed some light as to why the Boston Celtics may be unwilling to part ways with Jae Crowder