Olympic Stadium tower ripped by London critics

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Olympic Stadium tower ripped by London critics

From Comcast SportsNet

LONDON (AP) Critics say it looks like a roller coaster gone badly awry. Fans say it's a landmark to rival the Eiffel Tower.

London got a towering new venue Friday, as authorities announced completion of the Orbit, a 115-meter (377- foot) looped and twisting steel tower beside London's new Olympic Stadium that will give visitors panoramic views over the city.

Some critics have called the ruby-red lattice of tubular steel an eyesore. British tabloids have labeled it ''the Eye-ful Tower,'' ''the Godzilla of public art'' and worse.

But artist Anish Kapoor and engineer Cecil Balmond, who designed the tower, find it beautiful.

Belmond, who described the looping structure as ''a curve in space,'' said he thought people would be won over by it.

''St. Paul's (Cathedral) was hated when it was begun,'' he said. ''Everyone wanted a spire'' - but now the great church's dome is universally loved.

He said if a groundbreaking structure works ''it starts to do something to you and your concept of beauty changes.''

Kapoor noted that Paris's iconic Eiffel Tower was considered ''the most tremendously ugly object'' by many when it was first built.

''There will be those who love it and those who hate it, and that's OK,'' Kapoor said of the tower, whose full name is the ArcelorMittal Orbit, after the steel company that stumped up most of the 22.7 million pound (36.5 million) cost.

''I think it's awkward,'' Kapoor said - considering that a compliment. ''It has its elbows sticking out in a way. ... It refuses to be an emblem.''

A little awkwardness is to be expected when you ask an artist to design a building. Kapoor, a past winner of art's prestigious Turner Prize, is known for large-scale installations like ''Marsyas'' - a giant blood-red PVC membrane that was displayed at London's Tate Modern in 2002 - and ''The Bean,'' a 110-ton (100-metric ton) stainless steel sculpture in Chicago's Millennium Park.

Even for him, though, the scale of the Orbit is monumental.

He says the structure can only truly be appreciated from inside - something most of the public will not have the chance to do until 2014, when it reopens as the centerpiece of a brand-new park on the site of the 2012 London Olympic Park.

Before that, it will be open to ticketholders for this summer's Olympic and Paralympic Games, whop can ride the elevator to the top at a cost of 15 pounds (22).

Kapoor said visitors would enter a ''dark and heavy'' steel canopy at base before emerging into the light high above ground, where a wraparound viewing deck and a pair of huge concave mirrors create ''a kind of observatory, looking out at London.''

''It's as if one is in an instrument for looking,'' Kapoor said.

London Olympic organizers hope the Orbit, which can accommodate up to 5,000 visitors a day, will become a major tourist attraction.

It is, they note proudly, the tallest sculpture in Europe - and 22 meters (72 feet) higher than the Statue of Liberty. On a clear day, views from its observation deck extend for 32 kilometers (20 miles) across London and the green hills beyond.

The tower will be at the heart of a new 227-hectare (560-acre) park, the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, that will include a lush river valley, biking trails and a tree-lined promenade. It is due to open in stages starting in July 2013 and finishing in early 2014.

London Mayor Boris Johnson takes credit for pitching the idea of a tower to steel baron Lakshmi Mittal at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland in 2009. He is a huge fan of the finished product.

''It is a genuine Kapoor,'' Johnson said. ''It has all the enigmatic qualities of some of his great pieces.''

And he believes other Londoners will come to love it, too.

''I think so,'' he said, then paused. ''In the end.''

Morning Skate: Not a dry eye as Canucks draftee gets the call

Morning Skate: Not a dry eye as Canucks draftee gets the call

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while getting ready to check out GLOW on Netflix.

*This video of a Vancouver Canucks draft pick tearing up while watching the video of his brother celebrating him getting picked is all that is right with the NHL Draft.  

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) Adrian Dater has Avs first-round pick Cale Makar talking about his hockey background, and why it doesn’t matter.

*The Calgary Flames are excited about their prospects and the pieces they were able to acquire last weekend.

*The Washington Capitals have re-signed Brett Connolly for a couple of years at short money and he appears to have found a home in DC.

*The Chicago Blackhawks are still in talks with Marian Hossa about how to resolve his contract and the allergic skin condition that might have prematurely ended his hockey career.

*Will the Tampa Bay sports go through a dry spell when it comes to Hall of Fame athletes now that former Lighting forward Dave Andreychuk has been called to the Hockey Hall?

*It looks like young Pierre Luc Dubois will be put in a position to contribute with the Columbus Blue Jackets this season.

*Alex Prewitt has a preview of the NHL free agency period and the stress levels that many players go through in it.

*For something completely different: This video of Drake and Will Ferrell hoop handshakes was pretty solid, and funny.

 

Drellich: Hanley Ramirez has to improve or Red Sox need to try others

Drellich: Hanley Ramirez has to improve or Red Sox need to try others

BOSTON — It doesn’t really matter what’s holding Hanley Ramirez back: his health, his desire to play at less-than-100 percent, neither, both. The Red Sox need him to produce more at the plate, as the designated hitter, or need to play someone who can produce more.

The suggestion of putting Ramirez on the disabled list so that his shoulders (and now, his left knee, where he was hit by a pitch Sunday) may heal is reasonable. If you can’t hit well — if you can’t even be in the lineup — why are you on the roster?

Ramirez was out for a second straight game Tuesday night. 

Flat-out benching Ramirez in favor of Chris Young or Sam Travis or both for a time makes sense too. Young will DH again Tuesday and Travis will start at first against Twins left-hander Hector Santiago. 

Try one, try all. The route to better production doesn’t matter. As long as the Sox get some, be it from Ramirez or somewhere else.

After Mitch Moreland, who’s playing with a fractured big toe on his left foot, homered and had another impactful night on Monday, Sox manager John Farrell made some comments that are hard to read as anything but a message to Ramirez.

“In his most recent stretch, he’s been able to get on top of some fastballs that have been at the top of the strike zone or above for some power obviously,” Farrell said. “But I think the way he’s gone about it given the physical condition he’s in, is a strong message to the remainder of this team.”

Tuesday is June 27. From May 27 on, Ramirez is hitting .202 with a .216 on-base percentage and .369 slugging percentage. 

In the final three months of the 2016 season, Ramirez hit .300 with a .379 OBP and .608 slugging percentage. That’s from the start of July through the end of the regular season. 

The potential for such a second-half surge is hard to ignore. The Sox need to figure out if Ramirez is healthy enough to give it to them, and if not, be willing to give someone else an extended look — be it with Ramirez on the bench or the DL.