Artie T.: "I'll be Forever Grateful

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Artie T.: "I'll be Forever Grateful

Market Basket's newly reinstated CEO Arthur T. Demoulas told workers at a Chelsea, Massachusetts, supermarket that he is "forever grateful" Monday, days after he returned to helm the grocery chain following months of worker protests and boycotts triggered by his June ouster.

The man better known to supporters as Artie T. gave workers in Chelsea a lift as they restocked the store. He said the priority now, days after his $1.5 billion deal to buy the company, is to restore stores to customers' expectations, after months hampered by walkouts and empty shelves.

Demoulas reiterated his gratitude to the workers whose pressure helped return him to the helm, and said he is able to connect with his staff of 25,000 through hands-on experience and working together.

"We try to be good to one another and help each other out," Demoulas told workers. "We certainly saw that in the past six or seven weeks.

"I'll be forever grateful," he added.

Demoulas said his first order of business would be to say "thank you, millions of times over."

The turmoil that has roiled Market Basket all summer culminated late last week in Demoulas' deal to buy a majority stake in the company and in his return as CEO, to roars of support from the workers whose intense pressure, protests and walkouts had helped ensure it.

"I love you all," the told them Friday, just after the board controlled by a rival cousin accepted his $1.5 billion bid for a majority stake Thursday night.

Arthur T. had been ousted as CEO back in June by allies of his rival cousin Arthur S. Demoulas, sparking the two-month dispute, in which employee protests and customer boycotts left many stores and shelves empty.

When news broke that he had regained control of the company, hundreds of supporters gathered Friday at company headquarters in Tewksbury, where he spoke to them.

"I've always believed that we are born into this world at a certain time and a certain place to be with certain people for a reason and a purpose," he told the crowd there. "Everyone has a destiny, and because of you, I stand here with a renewed vigor and a sense of purpose."

The restoration of some Market Basket stores could take several weeks, Arthur T. told reporters Friday, but employees have been working around the clock since his reinstatement to restock empty shelves and reestablish ties with vendors.

Customers were found last week ready to shop once again.

“People are bringing in champagne bottles. Customers are bringing in balloons and donuts and food. It’s great. It's a great feeling,” Tewksbury store manager Mike Riley said.

"It's just a good feeling," said customer Cindy Stamp, whose son works in a Market Basket warehouse. "It's about food, but it's really not. It's about what he does for all our children and people that need jobs. I mean, that to me is the biggest. My son makes a living. Do you believe that? A living off of working in a warehouse. Who can say that?"

Photo Credit: NECN

First impressions: Wright again the victim of poor run support

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First impressions: Wright again the victim of poor run support

CHICAGO -- First impressions of the Red Sox' 4-1 loss to the White Sox.

 

Steven Wright has a 1.67 ERA, and somehow, has three losses.

Wright was again the victim of poor run support. He pitched six innings, allowed just two runs and yet was saddled with the loss, dropping him to 2-3.

In his three losses to date, here are the scores of the games when he left: 2-0, 2-1, 2-1.

Some poor command in the third cost Wright a bit. He walked the first two hitters of the inning, and after a groundout moved the runners over, issued an intentional walk to load the bases. A groundout then scored a run for the White Sox, who never threatened again.

In fact, after the intentional walk, Wright retired 11 of the next 12 hitters he faced.

 

Carson Smith pitched as expected.

Making his Red Sox debut after missing the first month with a forearm strain, Smith retired the White Sox in order and needed just nine pitches to get the three outs.

Smith's M.O. is that he has a heavy sinker and can make hitters swing-and-miss. He got two groundouts, then overpowered Austin Jackson with a mix of sinkers and sliders for an inning-ending strikeout.

 

The Red Sox fell to 0-3 against lefty starters.

Obviously, it's an extremely small sample size. And maybe it's because the Sox haven't had a lot of looks at lefties, having faced just two in their first 25 games before Tuesday night.

Then again, Chicago starter Jose Quintana has always been tough on the Red Sox. Even before limiting them to a single run over seven innings, Quintana was 2-0 with a 2.14 ERA in six previous starts.

Boston hit the ball hard three times. Once, Hanley Ramirez homered to right. Twice, White Sox outfielders took extra bases away from David Ortiz (Austin Jackson in the first) and Jackie Bradley Jr. (Adam Eaton in the third).

 

Junichi Tazawa has been excellent, but not Tuesday night.

Tazawa came into a 2-1 game in the eighth. The first four hitters to face him went: bunt single, walk, (wild pitch), two-run double, walk.

Granted, one of the hits was a bunt. But you can't afford to issue two walks and throw a wild pitch in a one-run game.

That outing came after nine straight scoreless outings, and had been scored upon in just one of his first 11 outings.

But Tazawa couldn't locate Tuesday and it cost him.