Wisconsin's Carimi proclaims himself best OT in draft

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Wisconsin's Carimi proclaims himself best OT in draft

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com

INDIANAPOLIS - If someone advised Wisconsin offensive tackle Gabe Carimi to appear confident, he heeded that advice. Carimi matter-of-factly proclaimed himself the best tackle in the year's draft class on Thursday at the NFL Scouting Combine. Asked if he had any butterflies about the Combine workouts, Carimi said, "I'm completely confident in my game. I really don't have any problems. I know I'm going out there and perform. I know I'm the best tackle out there and I just have to play like it and act like it."The 6-foot-7, 315-pound Carimi is regarded as one of the top five at his position.Wes Bunting of the National Football post has Carimi as the second-best tackle behind USC's Tyron Smith. Pro Football Weekly has Carimi third behind Smith and BC's Anthony Castonzo. Castonzo, who stepped to the podium right after Carimi, was told of Carimi's proclamation. "That's his opinion," Castonzo said quickly. What will determine who's the best, Castonzo was asked."It's what we've already put on film," he said. "I'm not gonna stand up here and say I'm better than him or he's better than me. It's for the scouts to decide based on what we put on film. This is just the capper right here."Castonzo did mention that he's enjoying Carimi. It's hard not to. A few other nuggets . . . Asked about Ohio State's defense: "We drove on them like I don't think anyone did this year. On a Michigan State defender (sorry, question inaudible). "I did really good against him, he had like one tackle." On readiness: "I know I can play right away. I think that's the best aspect of me. I'm a draft-ready tackle that will be able to play in the National Football League next year." Carimiplayed guard at the Senior Bowl but says no teams are considering him for that. "Realistically, I'm a tackle." He says he can play either side. There's a lot of interest in Carimi. He said he's met with most teams. He confirmed he'd spoken to the Ravens, but when asked about the Patriots he answered,"I don't know. I can't comment on the Patriots. Ask the Patriots."Kid's a natural.

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Caserio: Brady's age has nothing to do with draft approach

Caserio: Brady's age has nothing to do with draft approach

FOXBORO -- The Patriots took four players in this year's draft. Four. That's the smallest draft class in team history

Instead, as Bill Belichick highlighted on Friday night, they spent multiple picks in this year's draft to pick up proven commodities. 

* Their first and third-rounders were sent to New Orleans in exchange for receiver Brandin Cooks and a fourth. 

* Their second-rounder ended up in Carolina, bringing defensive end Kony Ealy and a third to New England. 

* They lost a fourth-rounder to Deflategate and sent another away in order to pry tight end Dwayne Allen and a sixth-rounder from the Colts. 

* They sent a fifth-rounder to Buffalo as compensation for signing restricted free agent running back Mike Gillislee. 

* Before last season the Patriots sent a fifth to Cleveland for linebacker Barkevious Mingo. 

* Before last season's trade deadline they sent a sixth-round pick to Detroit for Kyle Van Noy and a seventh-rounder. 

"Obviously, we’ve been watching a lot of picks go by," Belichick said on Friday, "but I feel like overall our opportunity in this draft started a couple of months ago. The four players that we acquired already are also part of the draft process. Hopefully we’ve been able to improve our team, become more competitive. That’s the ultimate goal."

Even on the last day of the draft, the Patriots didn't stop trading picks for veterans when they sent No. 183 overall to Kansas City in exchange for tight end James O'Shaughnessy

But when Nick Caserio was asked on Saturday if his team's approach to the draft -- taking more established players instead of gambling on draft picks -- had anything to do with Tom Brady's age, he shot down that theory.

“That has zero to do with it,” Caserio said. “I would say really the team-building process is very fluid. How it is going to go? There’s no template. There is no book with how it is going to go. 

"There’s a lot of really good players that were in this draft that have been drafted and will help their respective teams. We understand that and understand we felt the same way. There were enough players up there that we felt good about. We take the resources that we have and we try and make the best decision for our team."

In reality, the approach of taking such a small number of draftees is probably more a reflection of the current roster than the quarterback's age. It's loaded, and it seems like there will be relatively few opportunities for rookies to make the Week 1 roster.

Patriots take just 4 players in smallest draft class in franchise history

Patriots take just 4 players in smallest draft class in franchise history

FOXBORO -- Heading into the opening of the 2017 draft on Thursday, the Patriots had just six selections -- none of which were in the first two rounds. It stood to reason that the team might get creative and find a way to make either more selections or earlier selections. When all was said and done, the opposite had occurred. 

The Patriots concluded the draft having made just four selections -- two in the third, one in the fourth and one in the sixth -- in what proved to be the smallest draft class in franchise history. 

The Pats’ selections were: 

Amongst other trades, the Pats moved the fifth-round pick they had entering the weekend to Kansas for tight end James O’Shaughnessy. They also traded a seventh-round pick to the Cowboys in order to move up in the sixth round to select McDermott. 

During the offseason, the Pats moved first, second and third-round picks in deals that netted them receiver Brandin Cooks and pass-rusher Kony Ealy. The team also surrended a fifth-round pick to the Bills for signing restricted free agent running back Mike Gillislee. 

Patriots director of player personnel Nick Caserio said after the draft that he isn't surprised that the team, which has historically placed a high value on draft picks, only picked four players. 

"Whoever we end up with, we end up with," Caserio said. "I mean, the draft, whoever we pick -- OK, there's four players there -- we acquired players as a part of trades. They're a part of it; the undrafted players are a part of it, so let's call it, I don't know, 25 to 30 new players that we've sort of added to the team. However they get here, they get here. We can't necessarily control that. We just try to take our resources and try to make the best decision for our team and get the players on the team however we can get them here. That's what we try to do."

Prior to 2017, the Pats’ smallest draft class was in 2002, when the team made six selections. That class also featured higher picks, however, as the team picked in the first round (Daniel Graham) and second (Deion Branch). Rivers’ selection at No. 83 made him the latest into a draft that the Pats had made their first selection.