Tucker: This is the best Patriots offense I've seen

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Tucker: This is the best Patriots offense I've seen

The Patriots faster-than-the-speed-of-sound offense has been a hot topic around New England over the last few days, and it's gaining national notice too.

Ross Tucker of NBC's Sports Talk was on with CSNNE's Bob Neumeier to talk about the offense, and count Tucker as a fan.

"Well I think it's pretty awesome, and it's really interesting to me, Bob, how the last couple of years a lot of the concepts of college have actually come to the NFL. It uses to always be the opposite way, it used to be always that everything would trifle down.

Tucker said the Pats are "not afraid to beg, borrow, and steal from other successful collegiate organizations"

But just how good does Tucker think the Pats offense is? They broke records in 2007 . . . but are they better than that?

"I think this is the best Patriots offense I've ever seen. I know that will give a couple people pause, but they really have everything."

Tucker defends his point by saying that the Pats were a great offense last season and added a "dynamic running game and deep threat in Brandon Lloyd.

Speaking of receiving threats, Wes Welker may have ruffled a few feathers with his joke about Belichick, saying that it's "always nice to stick it in Bill's face" when talking about his production in Sunday's win over the Broncos.

"There's always a little bit of truth to sarcasm," Tucker said.

But he also says that Welker should be on the field as much as possible.

"If the Patriots lose any games when they're not playing Wes Welker pretty much full time I think they're opening themselves up to a tremendous amount of criticism from folks like me."

Whalen, part of Colts' infamous fake punt play, settles in with Patriots

Whalen, part of Colts' infamous fake punt play, settles in with Patriots

FOXBORO – Griff Whalen was at the epicenter of one of the stupidest, funniest, most “did that just happen?!” plays in NFL history.

So indescribable it never even really earned a name, it was the fourth-down gadget play the Colts tried to run against the Patriots on Sunday Night Football in the first meeting between the teams after Indy ran to the principal’s office to start Deflategate. 

Whalen was the center on that play (I tried to call it “Fourth-and-Wrong” but it didn’t take) and the millisecond between him snapping the ball and the three players processing that the ball had indeed been snapped is perhaps my favorite moment of the past several seasons. 

Whalen is a Patriot now, brought in this week in the wake of Danny Amendola’s knee injury presumably to fill Amendola’s role as a punt returner and wideout. The Colts released him last January, the Dolphins picked him up and cut him at the end of training camp and the Chargers had him on their roster from mid-September until releasing him last month after eight games, two catches and 22 yards. He returned kickoffs for San Diego but no punts since 2015.

The primary area of need for the Patriots is on punt returns. Rookie Cyrus Jones’ transition to appearing comfortable remains glacially slow. It was Jones’ muff last week that brought on Amendola in relief. When Amendola hurt his ankle on a late-game return, the Patriots were forced to decide between Jones, wideout Julian Edelman (who doesn’t need extra work) and making a move.

Whalen is a move they made.

The slight and baby-faced Whalen indicated he had fielded some punts in practice, saying it went, “Fine.” Punt returns are something he’s done “since I was a kid.”

His first impression of the team was, "A lot of what I expected to see. A lot of detail. A lot of effort in practice. Good coaching all-around. I am excited to be here. I was excited to come into a good team that I’d gone against a few times. Hopefully come in and help out the team with whatever I can.”

I asked Whalen if he saw much of the commentary or creativity last year’s failed play spawned.

“I wasn’t paying too much attention,” he said. “When it’s during the season guys are pretty locked in on what they’re doing inside the building. But I heard more about it later on afterwards.”

Asked if he’d heard anything about the play since being here, Whalen replied, “I haven’t. Kinda was [expecting it].”

The Patriots will be hoping Whalen remains as productive for them on fourth down this year as he was in 2015.

 

PFT: Belichick can still diagram his dad’s Navy plays from 1959

PFT: Belichick can still diagram his dad’s Navy plays from 1959

CBS interviewed Patriots coach Bill Belichick and 1960 Heisman winner Joe Bellino from Navy as part of its Army-Navy Game coverage Saturday.

Belichick's father, Steve, was an assistant coach at Navy when Bellino played there, and little Bill, then 7, took it all in. So much so, that 57 years later, Belichick can still diagram the 27 F Trap play that his dad used to drew up in the 1959 season for Bellino.

More from NBC Sports' Pro Football Talk here.