Tucker: This is the best Patriots offense I've seen

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Tucker: This is the best Patriots offense I've seen

The Patriots faster-than-the-speed-of-sound offense has been a hot topic around New England over the last few days, and it's gaining national notice too.

Ross Tucker of NBC's Sports Talk was on with CSNNE's Bob Neumeier to talk about the offense, and count Tucker as a fan.

"Well I think it's pretty awesome, and it's really interesting to me, Bob, how the last couple of years a lot of the concepts of college have actually come to the NFL. It uses to always be the opposite way, it used to be always that everything would trifle down.

Tucker said the Pats are "not afraid to beg, borrow, and steal from other successful collegiate organizations"

But just how good does Tucker think the Pats offense is? They broke records in 2007 . . . but are they better than that?

"I think this is the best Patriots offense I've ever seen. I know that will give a couple people pause, but they really have everything."

Tucker defends his point by saying that the Pats were a great offense last season and added a "dynamic running game and deep threat in Brandon Lloyd.

Speaking of receiving threats, Wes Welker may have ruffled a few feathers with his joke about Belichick, saying that it's "always nice to stick it in Bill's face" when talking about his production in Sunday's win over the Broncos.

"There's always a little bit of truth to sarcasm," Tucker said.

But he also says that Welker should be on the field as much as possible.

"If the Patriots lose any games when they're not playing Wes Welker pretty much full time I think they're opening themselves up to a tremendous amount of criticism from folks like me."

Malcolm Butler on Instagram: 'Nothing changed but the change'

Malcolm Butler on Instagram: 'Nothing changed but the change'

We haven't heard from cornerback Malcolm Butler as his future as a Patriot hangs in the balance after his visit with the New Orleans Saints last week.

Butler,  a restricted free agent who has yet to sign the $3.91 million tender offered by the Patriots, posted a photo Wednesday on Instagram with the cryptic message "Nothing changed but the change," which happens to be a lyric from a song titled "Could It Be" by rapper Nick Lyon. So, perhaps a change of teams is being referred to.

"Nothing changed but the change" #BLESSED

A post shared by Malcolm CB Butler (@mac_bz) on

More to come...

Goodell: NFL working on a way to reduce commercial breaks during games

Goodell: NFL working on a way to reduce commercial breaks during games

The NFL is acknowledging it has a time-management issue. Games are too long. Commercial are too frequent. And according to an email addressed to NFL fans, Roger Goodell is hoping to change that.

On Wednesday afternoon the commissioner explained the methods by which the league is hoping to improve the fan experience, most of which concern the presentation of games with as few interruptions as possible. 

"On the football side, there are a number of changes we are making to the mechanics and rules of the game to maintain excitement and also improve the consistency of our officiating," Goodell wrote. "For example, next week clubs will vote on a change to centralize replay reviews. Instead of a fixed sideline monitor, we will bring a tablet to the Referee who can review the play in consultation with our officiating headquarters in New York, which has the final decision. This should improve consistency and accuracy of decisions and help speed up the process.

"Regarding game timing, we're going to institute a play clock following the extra point when television does not take a break, and we're considering instituting a play clock after a touchdown. We're also going to standardize the starting of the clock after a runner goes out-of-bounds, and standardize halftime lengths in all games, so we return to the action as quickly as possible. Those are just a few of the elements we are working on to improve the pace of our game."

Goodell also mentioned that the NFL is working with its broadcast partners to reduce the frequency of commercial breaks during games. 

"For example," Goodell wrote, "we know how annoying it is when we come back from a commercial break, kick off, and then cut to a commercial again. I hate that too. Our goal is to eliminate it."

Goodell, team owners and executives will convene in Phoenix next week for the league's annual meetings where discussions about these potential changes could see meaningful progress.