Stallworth says he'd like to rejoin Patriots

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Stallworth says he'd like to rejoin Patriots

By TomE. Curran
CSNNE.com

Former Patriot Donte Stallworth, who's had a very bad go of it since leaving the Patriots after the 2007 season, wants back in. Speaking to Jeff Howe of NESN.com, Stallworth said he "would definitely 100 percent go to New England."Stallworth, who'll turn 31 in November, is coming off a season in Baltimore in which he caught just two passes and played in only eight games because of a broken foot.
He was suspended by the NFL for the 2009 season after pleading guilty to DUI and second-degree manslaughter for the death of 59-year-old Mario Reyes. Stallworth struck and killed Reyes on the morning of March 14, 2009. Stallworth admitted he was drinking prior to the accident. He received a 30-day sentence and served 24 of those. The season prior, he caught just 17 passes for the Browns who he signed with after leaving the Patriots in 2007. "I had the best time in New England," Stallworth told Howe. "I made a lot of friends in that area, in the organization, on the team . . . I still have a lot of friends there, still have a lot of friends on the team, still close with some of the coaches there. Returning to New England would definitely be an option. I want to be able to put myself in position to be able to show that I can still play football, and I would definitely 100 percent go to New England."Stallworth's speed has always been his best asset. He caught 46 balls for 697 yards (15.2 average) with the Patriots. He was most often lined up as the X-receiver for the Patriots. It's not a surprise Stallworth is attempting to curry interest. With his injury history and the 2009 issue, he doesn't figure to be an in-demand free agent if and when the 2011 free agent period actually comes. Tom E. Curran canbe reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

How will Jacoby Brissett's development effect decision to trade or keep Jimmy Garoppolo?

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How will Jacoby Brissett's development effect decision to trade or keep Jimmy Garoppolo?

In this week's episode of "Quick Slants The Podcast" presented by Papa Gino's, Tom E. Curran and Phil Perry discuss Patriots players and coaches that could be either coming or going. Also, former offensive lineman and current sports radio host Rich Ohrnberger is this week's guest to talk about his years with the team, including some great stories on O-Line coach Dante Scarnecchia.

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Here's this week's rundown:

  • (3:10) Can Cyrus Jones recover next year, and does he need to with the potential loss of Logan Ryan?
  • (9:54) What to expect the end result to be for free-agent Dont'a Hightower. Is the franchise tag acceptable for both parties?
  • (20:30) Is Jimmy Garoppolo here to stay...(25:30) and how does Jacoby Brissett's development answer that question.
  • (30:58) The loss of tight end coach Brian Daboll to Alabama
  • (42:28) Interview with Rich Ohrnberger
  • (1:04:22) Michigan's Jabrill Peppers on the Patriots draft board

Kraft won't hold a grudge over Deflategate, but he also won't forget it

Kraft won't hold a grudge over Deflategate, but he also won't forget it

Haters gonna hate. Robert Kraft knows that, and he's not going to hold a grudge because of it. But he won't forget, either.

The New England Patriots owner appeared on the latest episode of HBO's "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" for an interview with Andrea Kremer that aired Tuesday night, and he was as candid as any member of the organization has been throughout the Deflategate saga.

“I really don’t hold grudges,” Kraft admitted in the interview, per WEEI. “I mean, I remember everything, but I move on . . . Envy and jealousy are incurable diseases. The haters still hate. And I understand it, and we’ll do our best to keep them in that position.”

And while Kraft isn't holding grudges, he still recognizes the negative impact the controversy left on Tom Brady's pristine reputation.

“He’s just not the greatest quarterback in the history of the NFL,” Kraft began. “He’s an amazing human being. And is genuine. And as nice as everybody thinks he is, he’s nicer. And to see anyone attack him as an individual or his integrity. And that just wasn’t fair.”