From Dillon to Blount, two highest shares of Patriots' carries have gone to 30-year-olds

From Dillon to Blount, two highest shares of Patriots' carries have gone to 30-year-olds

According to a quick Google search, cows live for about 20 years. According to Bill Belichick (seemingly), bell cows aren’t even born for another decade. 

Though it defies the popular theory that running backs are out of their primes by the time they’re 30, Belichick has gotten two of the Patriots’ best rushing performances during his head coaching tenure out of 30-year-olds.  

Currently enjoying the best season of his career after recently turning 30, LeGarrette Blount has already used this campaign to set the Patriots’ single-season record for rushing touchdowns with 15. This season is one of just five 1000-yard showings from a Pats running back since 2000 and he’s 204 yards from sitting behind only Corey Dillon for the second-most rushing yards in a single season for the Pats under Belichick.  

Blount and Dillon. Those guys have anything in common? 

1. Old! (For a running back, not for the Earth)
2. Carries!

Look back through 30-year-old running backs who've rushed for 1,000 yards. There are plenty, but mediocre backs don’t accidentally end up with a 1,000-yard season or two the way younger ones might. The guys to do it post-30? You’re talking about the Adrian Petersons, Frank Gores, Ricky Williamses, Fred Taylors and Tiki Barbers of the world.

Dillon turned 30 during his first season with the Patriots, which saw him rush for a Belichick-era-best 1,635 yards in 2004. He also got a share of the carries that Belichick doesn’t hand out often. 

In that 2004 season, Dillon was responsible for 345 of the Patriots’ 524 rushing attempts. That’s good for 66 percent, which is the largest slice of the rushing pie Belichick has given a running back in New England. 

Though Antowain Smith got 60 percent of the Pats’ carries twice before Dillon, nobody’s come close to Dillon’s 2004 share since. Only two seasons from then until last season saw one back even get 50 percent of the carries, but this season, Blount has gotten a similar share. He’s had the ball for 265 of the Patriots’ 413 runs, which is 64 percent. 

Without a doubt, Dion Lewis’ second knee surgery and subsequent absence until Week 11 have figured into that, and Week 15’s 18-carry game for Lewis is a sign the team feels he’s up to speed. Still, for a team just two seasons removed from 22 percent being the biggest share of carries for a back (Shane Vereen) the overall reliance on Blount has been fascinating.

So too is the fact that it’s Blount. Unless you’re part of Danny Woodhead’s cult following, you’ll probably agree that the Patriots often don’t have the “sexy” running back: the guy NFL Live dedicates an entire segment to each week, the guy fantasy players target in the first round, the guy folks term one of the greats as they’re watching them, etc. 

Post-2004, the closest they got to that perception was when rookie first-rounder Laurence Maroney sliced up the Bengals for 125 yards in 2006, and we all know how that worked out. 

No, instead of the high-profile options in what history would suggest is their primes, the Pats usually have opted for players with lesser pedigrees (BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Sammy Morris), a first-round castoff (Smith), and a big name perceived to be near the end of his career (Dillon). They let 2011 third-rounder Stevan Ridley, who rushed for over 1,200 yards in his second season, walk at the end of his rookie contract. 

Then there’s Blount: has had big games in his career, but only had two 100-yard rushing performances in 20 games for New England entering this season. Usually his return to the team each year is met with some sort of couldn’t-they-get-anybody-better sentiment. 

Yet Blount’s 2016 is the latest reminder against confusing not being a Madden cover candidate with not being productive. After all, the unheralded Green-Ellis ran for over 1,000 yards in 2010. You can be damn good as a Patriots running back, provided you’re given the opportunity.

That’s exactly what’s happened for Blount, and he’s rewarded them with one of the best seasons for a Patriots running back of the Belichick era. 

NFL's Top 10 list revealed Monday night: Where does Tom Brady wind up?

NFL's Top 10 list revealed Monday night: Where does Tom Brady wind up?

NFL players vote every year on which players should make up the list of the best their game has to offer, but it's an imperfect system. And that's probably putting it lightly. 

The NFL Network will reveal the final 10 players on its annual Top 100 list Monday night at 8 p.m. It will be an order that has been chosen by some players, not all. Of those who took part, some hastily made their way through a handful of names at the end of last season handing over their choices. 

Yet it's the list the league ends up with, for better or for worse, prompting responses like JJ Watt's when he found out he was No. 35 this year after playing in three games last season. 

On NFL.com, the Top 100 list is described as the answer to the question, "Who are the top 100 players in the NFL today?" If that's the criteria -- and not simply performance in 2016 -- then Watt's complaint actually doesn't hold much water. If he's healthy, no one would argue that he's one of the best 35 players "in the NFL today."

This year, several Patriots players from 2016 made the cut: Rob Gronkowski (No. 23), LeGarrette Blount (No. 80), Julian Edelman (No. 71), Dont'a Hightower (No. 94) and Malcolm Butler (No. 99). 

Tom Brady will be the last of Bill Belichick's players to be named. He's lumped into a Top 10 that will include Aaron Rodgers, Matt Ryan, Ezekiel Elliott, Le'Veon Bell, Antonio Brown, Odell Beckham, Julio Jones, Von Miller and Khalil Mack.

Here's what we think the list should look like when the curtain falls on the finale of this flawed endeavor:

10. Elliott
9. Beckham
8. Bell
7. Brown
6. Ryan
5. Jones
4. Miller
3. Mack
2. Rodgers
1. Brady

David Harris gets Jerod Mayo's old No. 51 with Patriots

David Harris gets Jerod Mayo's old No. 51 with Patriots

If you're hoping to help lead the Patriots defense from the middle of the field, No. 51 wouldn't be a bad jersey to wear in that pursuit.

Those are the digits that were worn by longtime Patriots captain (and Quick Slants co-host) Jerod Mayo during his run with the team from 2008-15. Taking the torch from linebackers like Tedy Bruschi, Junior Seau and Mike Vrabel, Mayo was the defensive signal-caller and quarterback of the Patriots defense for the better part of a decade, eventually handing the reins to his understudy Dont'a Hightower. 

With Harris now in the mix, the defense will still be led by Hightower, who was a captain for the first time in 2016. But Harris figures to serve as a leader in his own right for the Patriots. The 33-year-old 'backer has been one of the game's most durable players at his position while with the Jets, and over time he established himself as a savvy communicator at the second level. 

Comparing Harris to Mayo comes easily because of their reputations as coach-on-the-field types. Back in 2014 when Darrelle Revis called New England home, he explained that what Mayo did for the Patriots defense reminded him of what Harris did in New York.

Now Harris has Mayo's old number, and in training camp he'll make a play for some of the duties Mayo held later in his career. How Harris will handle his new role, and how he may help his teammates take their games to new heights, is something we touched upon in this space earlier today

Harris wore No. 52 during his 10 years with the Jets. That number has belonged to Patriots linebacker Elandon Roberts since he came into the league last season as a rookie, and it looks like Roberts will hold onto it for the foreseeable future.

No. 51 has bounced around to a couple of different Patriots since Mayo's retirement. Last year it was claimed by Barkevious Mingo, who has since moved on to Indianapolis as a free agent. Through this year's spring workouts No. 51 was worn by undrafted rookie linebacker Brooks Ellis, who now shares No. 47 with fullback Glenn Gronkowski.