Jets lose top receiver Quincy Enunwa for season

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Jets lose top receiver Quincy Enunwa for season

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -- The New York Jets will be without their top wide receiver for the season.

Quincy Enunwa will be placed on injured reserve with a bulging disk in his neck that will likely require surgery, with a recovery time of 6 to 9 months. Coach Todd Bowles said Monday that Enunwa will seek a second opinion, and the injury is not considered career-threatening.

"They said it wasn't, but going forward, we'll see," Bowles said. "They said he should come out OK."

Enunwa, projected as the Jets' No. 1 receiver, was hurt Saturday night during practice at MetLife Stadium. Bowles said the injury initially appeared similar to the one that held Enunwa out during spring workouts.

With Brandon Marshall and Eric Decker cut during the offseason, it appeared Enunwa would be given the opportunity to lead an inexperienced receiving corps. He has 80 career catches for 1,172 yards and four touchdowns over two seasons.

"He was a big part of it," Bowles said of Enunwa's role on offense. "Our young guys are just going to have to grow up fast."

After Enunwa, the Jets' most-experienced receiver is Marquess Wilson, who had 56 career catches for 777 yards and three touchdowns in four seasons in Chicago. Next is second-year receiver Robby Anderson, who made the team last summer after being an undrafted free agent and finished with 42 catches for 587 yards and two scores.

There's a significant dropoff in career production after that with Charone Peake (19 catches), Myles White (16), Chris Harper (14), Jalin Marshall (14), Lucky Whitehead (nine) and Frankie Hammond (four). New York also has four rookie receivers on the roster: third-rounder ArDarius Stewart, fourth-rounder Chad Hansen and undrafted Deshon Foxx and Gabe Marks.

That could prompt the Jets to scour the waiver wire or look into some unemployed veterans to help fill what might be the biggest void on the team - other than having yet to determine a starting quarterback.

"We'll look into it and see how our young guys develop, but we'll have our eyes open and see what's out there," Bowles said, later adding that "all options are open."

Enunwa was drafted in the sixth round out of Nebraska in 2014 and steadily improved to become a key part of the Jets' passing game. Last year was a breakthrough season, when he finished tied for second on the team with 58 receptions - one fewer than Marshall - and led the Jets with 857 yards receiving and four TD catches.

Bowles said Enunwa had tests in the spring while dealing with the initial injury, but was healthy and everything appeared fine until Saturday night.

"When he fell, it just flared up again," the coach said.

Bowles is uncertain as to how Enunwa was hurt in the offseason, but said it wasn't a bulging disk at that time.

"It's something that comes and goes," Bowles said. "It was just a tingling feeling and he didn't feel well. We rested him in the spring, and he came back and he fell down and I guess it reoccurred."

Jerry Jones, Cowboys kneel before national anthem against Cardinals

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Jerry Jones, Cowboys kneel before national anthem against Cardinals

GLENDALE, Ariz. - Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has been a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump, so the speculation was that he would not allow his players to kneel during the national anthem.

The Cowboys and their owner did kneel, though not during the anthem.

Following a weekend of kneeling and protesting across the NFL, the Cowboys and their owner displayed their own version of unity Monday night, kneeling on the field before rising as a group before the playing of the national anthem.

The Cowboys went into the locker room and returned to the field for the anthem, lining up between the sideline and the yard markers on the field.

Arm-in-arm, they dropped to a knee as a giant flag was carried onto the field, with Jones and his family in the middle near the 50-yard line.

Numerous boos rang out across University of Phoenix Stadium as the Cowboys kneeled and continued as the players rose, still arm-in-arm, and stepped back to the sideline as the flag was unfurled across the field. They remained connected as Jordin Sparks sang the national anthem.

The Arizona Cardinals had their own symbol of unity after a weekend of protests in the NFL, gathering along the goal line arm-in-arm during the national anthem. They were joined by owner Michael Bidwell, his family and general manager Steve Keim.

More than 200 NFL players kneeled, sat or prayed during the national anthem on Sunday after President Trump said any player who does not stand for the national anthem should be fired.

Three teams did not take the field for the national anthem and numerous NFL owners came out against Trump's statements.

EX-PATS PODCAST: Brown and Koppen in-depth conversation on national anthem protest

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EX-PATS PODCAST: Brown and Koppen in-depth conversation on national anthem protest

Former Patriots wide receiver Troy Brown joins Mike Giardi and Dan Koppen in this week’s episode of “The Ex-Pats Podcast” to discuss the protests from around the league and Donald Trump’s comments on Friday night. Troy spoke critically of the President on CSN’s Postgame Live show on Sunday, and the two former players react to what former teammate Matt Light said Monday morning on Toucher & Rich.

Also, the guys talk about the thrilling win for the Patriots against Houston, including whether Brandin Cooks has found his way into Tom Brady’s “trust tree” (24:40), Rob Gronkowski playing a monster role in the passing AND blocking game against Houston (29:00), and how concerning the defense has looked in the first three weeks of the season (32:30).