Jets explain presence of sideline camera

542788.jpg

Jets explain presence of sideline camera

By Phil Perry
CSNNE.com

Now this is a juicy photo, isn't it?

In it, a camera man who looks like a Jets employee is seen standing behind Jets offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer, pointing his camera out in the direction of the field.

Or is he shooting across the field, zoomed in on a Patriots coach giving signals on the opposing sideline?

Smell like Spygate? Remember, Bill Belichick was docked 500,000 and the Patriots were fined 250,000 and lost a first round draft pick after the NFL determined that they filmed Jets defensive coaches' signals in 2007.

Since the Jets camera man photo hit the World Wide Web, it's stirred up quite a reaction over whether or not it constitutes evidence for Spygate Part Deux.

On Tuesday, the Jets came out and told everyone to step back and take a deep breath. The camera man was a Jets employee, they explained, and he was authorized (the lime green vest he was wearing marked him as such) to be on the sideline to shoot video for "team programming."

The NFL allows team video crews and TV video crews that produce club-licensed programming (coaches shows, team magazine-style shows, etc.)on the sidelines to shoot footage for those club-licensed programs only.

So as long as the camera man wasn't shooting video for the Jets coaching staff to use as a scouting tool, the Jets are in the clear. But how does anyone know what these camera men are shooting? And how do we know coaches never gets their hands on the tapes to use them deviously?

Seems strange that the NFL would be OK with all of this given the fallout from Spygate.

From PFT:

If coaches are paranoid about the placement by NFL Films of microphones into the pads of offensive linemen, how can coaches be OK with the presence of cameramen who work not for the league or NFL films but for the team that could misuse the images captured by the cameras?This one just seems odd. Maybe every coach is fine with it because every coach has an in-house camera guy potentially doing precisely what the Patriots used to do, with only the addition of a lime green vest. Or maybe the lime green vest makes it easy to track the guy with the camera in order to make sure no funny business is happening.Still, it seems odd to say the least that NFL teams would want to have to worry about this.

Or maybe they aren't worried at all. Maybe, just maybe, every coach in the league trusts every other coach to play by the rules at all times. Sounds plausible . . . right?

It's official: Patriots nab third-round compensatory pick in Collins trade

browns-collins-jamie-collins-012017x.jpg

It's official: Patriots nab third-round compensatory pick in Collins trade

The Patriots received a conditional fourth-round pick in 2018 from the Browns in return for Jamie Collins. That's how the trade was described on the league's transaction wire. 

The "condition" of that fourth-rounder? Well, if the Browns received a third-round compensatory pick in 2017, the Patriots would nab that pick instead. 

On Friday, the NFL announced that the Browns had in fact been awarded a third-round compensatory pick, which meant that almost three full weeks after Super Bowl LI, everything was still coming up Patriots.

In actuality, the odds were pretty good all along that the Patriots would get what they got

Cleveland lost Pro Bowl center Alex Mack in free agency last offseason when he opted to sign with the Falcons. Because compensatory picks are based on free agents lost and free agents acquired, and because the Browns did not sign any similarly-impactful free agents, there was a good chance Mack's departure would render a third-round comp pick that would be shipped to New England.

Had Mack suffered a significant injury that forced his play to drop off or limited his time on the field, a third-rounder may have been out of the question, but he played well (named a Pro Bowler and a Second Team All-Pro) and stayed healthy -- lucky for the Patriots -- missing just 17 total snaps in the regular season. 

The Browns comp pick that will be sent to New England is No. 103 overall. The Patriots were also awarded a fifth-round comp pick, No. 185 overall. That was a result of the league weighing the departures of Akiem Hicks and Tavon Wilson against the arrival of Shea McClellin.

The Patriots now have nine selections in this year's draft: One first-rounder; one second-rounder; two third-rounders; one fourth-rounder*; two fifth-rounders; two seventh-rounders.

* The Patriots forfeited their highest fourth-round selection in this year's draft as part of their Deflategate punishment. They acquired a fourth-round pick from the Seahawks last year. Because that would have been the higher of their two selections, that's the one they'll lose. They will make their own fourth-round pick at No. 137 overall.

Gronkowski says he has 'no doubt' he'll be ready for start of next season

Gronkowski says he has 'no doubt' he'll be ready for start of next season

When it comes to projecting Rob Gronkowski's health, it's been best to steer clear of absolutes. There have been too many injuries, too many surgeries, to predict exactly how he'll feel months in advance. 

Still, in speaking with ESPN's Cari Champion recently, he said he had "no doubt" he'll be ready for Week 1 of the 2017 regular season. 

"Yes, for sure," he replied when asked if he expected to be good to go. 

Gronkowski also fielded a question about his long-term future in the sit-down. Lately it's been his coach Bill Belichick and his quarterback Tom  Brady who receiver all the life-after-football queries, but Gronkowski, 27, was asked how much longer he'd like to play. 

"I’m not really sure," he said. "I mean, I still love playing the game, and as of right now, I want to play as long as I possibly could play. My mindset is to keep on going."

Gronkowski landed on season-ending injured reserve in December after undergoing a procedure on his back -- his third back surgery since 2009. He's had nine reported surgeries -- including procedures on his knee, forearm and ankle -- since his final year at the University of Arizona.