Do Pats fans deserve an explanation?

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Do Pats fans deserve an explanation?

If you haven't read this morning's SRO post about Wes Welker, conspiracies and the Bill Belichick silent treatment, please do so now. When you're done, come on back.

We'll all wait . . .

OK, so after that post, we got the following response from Twitter follower @NewDirty9:

@csnne @rich_levine nothing bothers BB, but fans stuck with this team thru 1 win seasons spygate scandal. And we get 0 answers about anythin Smitty (@NewDirty9) September 19, 2012It's not the first time I've heard something like this from a Patriots fan, and I'd be lying if I said I haven't wrestled with the concept myself. After all, it's not always easy to care so much and invest so much time and energy into a team, while at the same time feeling like you're in the dark on so many matters of importance. Especially when it comes to a player like Wes Welker.

Welker's spent the last five years working his ass off for this coach, this team and its fans. He's taken so many brutal hits, perhaps quite literally taken years off his life and to see him jerked around like this can leave a pretty sour taste in your mouth. To have no explanation for why he's being jerked around? That's even worse.

But when it comes down to why Patriots fans put up with this kind of thing from Belichick, I think NewDirty9 answers the question in his tweet.

From 1989-1993, the Patriots posted five straight losing seasons, during which they went a combined 19-61. There was a one-win season. There was a two-win season. There was WAY TOO MUCH HUGH MILLEN. And yes, the fans who withstood those horrible years deserve an unbelievable amount of credit, respect and admiration from the franchise. They deserve, for instance . . .

More than a decade of cheering for one of the most dominant teams in NFL history.

See what I mean? Sure, in a perfect world, you'd like a coach who's not so insanely protective of every aspect of his team. A coach who let's the fans in and makes them feel a part of the process. But, what can you do? Is that really so much better than what we have now?

Either way, I know that what we have now is better than what we had back then.

I don't care if Bill Belichick boycott's every press conference for the rest of his time in New England, I'd rather be in the dark than spend another five years in the AFC basement.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Cyrus Jones: 'I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to'

Cyrus Jones: 'I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to'

It was a tough rookie season for Cyrus Jones after being selected by the New England Patriots in the second round of the the 2016 NFL Draft.

Despite struggling in the return game all season and being inactive for the playoffs, Jones will forever the labeled as a "Super Bowl Champion" after his team's victory over the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI.

But you won't hear Jones bragging about the victory.

"I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to," Jones told Childs Walker of the The Baltimore Sun. "I was part of the team, but I didn't feel a part of it."

The 23-year-old rookie played in 10 games for the Patriots, seeing 147 snaps on defense. But his struggles in the return game were a talking point for most of the season after he came in with such high expectations as a returner out of Alabama. 

"Honestly, it was hell for me," he explained. "That's the only way I can describe it. I didn't feel I deserved to be part of anything that was happening with the team. I felt embarrassed that these people probably thought they wasted a pick on me."

Jones has already turned the page on his rookie season saying, there's "no such thing as an offseason" because he "didn't earn it."

Robert Kraft profiled on this week's 'Real Sports' on HBO

Robert Kraft profiled on this week's 'Real Sports' on HBO

Robert Kraft is a bit taken aback when he walks into a room at Gillette Stadium and sees the Patriots' five Lombardi trophies lined up.

"Wow. That's the first time I've seen five trophies there," he tells Andrea Kremer on HBO's "Real Sports" in a interview that will air as part of this week's episode Tuesday at 10 p.m.

"A lot of people have their big dreams and get knocked down and don't have things go their way," Kraft says, "And you never give up hope and you really just hold on to it. Hard work and perserverance. You just keep getting up and getting up and then you get that breakthrough. I think that's what happened in overtime down in Houston. And that's lessons in life that are good for anyone." 

Here's an excerpt: