Branch, Holmes bring new dimension to rematch

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Branch, Holmes bring new dimension to rematch

By Danny Picard
CSNNE.com

FOXBORO -- The last time the Patriots and Jets played, both Deion Branch and Santonio Holmes were among the missing. Neither of the Super Bowl MVPs were on the field when New York beat New England, 28-14, in Week 2.

Branch, of course, wasn't even a Patriot; he was with the Seattle Seahawks at the time. Holmes was serving a four-game suspension for violating the NFL's substance-abuse policy.

Eleven weeks later, Branch is back with the team that he won Super Bowls with in 2003 and 2004 (and earned himself a Super Bowl MVP trophy in 2004 in the process). And Holmes, who earned his hardware as a member of the Pittsburgh Steelers, is playing again after serving his suspension.

Both add a new dynamic to their current rosters, different from what each defense saw in Week 2.

Patriots fans know what Branch brings to the table. His return to New England's offense has re-united him with Tom Brady and has, in a sense, rejuvenated his career. Since the bye-week trade that brought him back to the Pats, Branch has made 33 catches for 433 yards and three touchdowns in seven games.

Holmes, acquired in the offseason from Pittsburgh, has played seven games for the Jets this season. He has 32 receptions for 491 yards and four touchdowns.

The numbers between Branch and Holmes couldn't be more similar. Their skill sets are the same, too, says Patriots cornerback Kyle Arrington.

"Explosiveness, making the Jets offense even that much more dynamic," said Arrington about what Holmes brings to New York's offense. "Because he's fast, he's quick, and he's good after the catch. He adds a lot of explosiveness to the offense."

Holmes adds a great deal to New York's passing game, if not for his skill set then for the fact that the Jets already had a top-notch wide receiver in Braylon Edwards the last time the two teams went at it.

Patriots players believe the two are different, similar to how Branch is different to Randy Moss, the down-field threat that Branch replaced earlier in the season, when Moss was traded to the Minnesota Vikings.

"You know Braylon, he's a taller guy," said Arrington. "He's more of a jump-ball kind of guy. He's definitely more of a target in the red area. Not that Santonio isn't, but like I said, they just use Edwards' height, and he'll jump and go get the ball.

"Santonio, he definitely stretches the field . . . Santonio, man, not only is he fast, he's quick, and like I said, he's good after the catch. He's also a Super Bowl MVP. He's not that for nothing."

Branch isn't a Super Bowl MVP for nothing, either.

"That whole situation with Randy Moss there kind ofsurprised me," said Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis. "I would never think they would trade the type of caliberplayer Randy is, and what he brings to their offense. But they broughtDeion Branch in, and I think they did that because hes familiar with Tom Brady andtheir offense. I mean, the guy was a Super Bowl MVP, so hes comfortable in thesystem he knows.

"Their receiving corps is still good," added Revis. "They still got WesWelker. They got Deion to come in and fit right in. And they got Brandon Tate, aswell. And they got two good tight ends that can catch the ball and rungood routes."

Branch and Holmes will play Monday night at Gillette Stadium. Neither were available in Week 2. Their impact on the divisional race will be on display, in a similar fashion.

Danny Picard is on Twitter at http:twitter.comdannypicard

Sanu on Patriots' Super Bowl comeback: Lady Gaga's long halftime hurt Falcons

Sanu on Patriots' Super Bowl comeback: Lady Gaga's long halftime hurt Falcons

Three weeks removed from his team blowing a 25-point, second-half lead in the Super Bowl, Mohamed Sanu offered a possible explanation for the Atlanta Falcons losing their edge against the Patriots.

Lady Gaga.

More specifically, it was the half-hour-plus halftime show that interrupted the Falcons' rhythm, the receiver said Friday on the NFL Network's "Good Morning Football."

“Usually, halftime is only like 15 minutes, and when you’re not on the field for like an hour, it’s just like going to work out, like a great workout, and you go sit on the couch for an hour and then try to start working out again,” Sanu said.

Sanu was asked if the delay was something you can simulate in practice. 

"It's really the energy [you can't duplicate]," he said. "I don't know if you can simulate something like that. That was my first time experiencing something like that."

Patriots coach Bill Belichick did simulate it. In his Super Bowl practices, he had his team take long breaks in the middle.

Sanu also addressed the Falcons' pass-first play-calling that didn't eat up clock while the Patriots came back.

"The thought [that they weren't running the ball more] crossed your mind, but as a player, you're going to do what the coach [Dan Quinn] wants you to do." Sanu said. "He's called plays like that all the time."


 

It's official: Patriots nab third-round compensatory pick in Collins trade

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It's official: Patriots nab third-round compensatory pick in Collins trade

The Patriots received a conditional fourth-round pick in 2018 from the Browns in return for Jamie Collins. That's how the trade was described on the league's transaction wire. 

The "condition" of that fourth-rounder? Well, if the Browns received a third-round compensatory pick in 2017, the Patriots would nab that pick instead. 

On Friday, the NFL announced that the Browns had in fact been awarded a third-round compensatory pick, which meant that almost three full weeks after Super Bowl LI, everything was still coming up Patriots.

In actuality, the odds were pretty good all along that the Patriots would get what they got

Cleveland lost Pro Bowl center Alex Mack in free agency last offseason when he opted to sign with the Falcons. Because compensatory picks are based on free agents lost and free agents acquired, and because the Browns did not sign any similarly-impactful free agents, there was a good chance Mack's departure would render a third-round comp pick that would be shipped to New England.

Had Mack suffered a significant injury that forced his play to drop off or limited his time on the field, a third-rounder may have been out of the question, but he played well (named a Pro Bowler and a Second Team All-Pro) and stayed healthy -- lucky for the Patriots -- missing just 17 total snaps in the regular season. 

The Browns comp pick that will be sent to New England is No. 103 overall. The Patriots were also awarded a fifth-round comp pick, No. 185 overall. That was a result of the league weighing the departures of Akiem Hicks and Tavon Wilson against the arrival of Shea McClellin.

The Patriots now have nine selections in this year's draft: One first-rounder; one second-rounder; two third-rounders; one fourth-rounder*; two fifth-rounders; two seventh-rounders.

The third-round compensatory pick acquired by the Patriots carries additional value this year in that it is the first year in which compensatory picks can be traded. A near top-100 overall selection may allow the Patriots to move up the draft board or build assets in the middle rounds should they be inclined to deal. And we know they oftentimes are. 

* The Patriots forfeited their highest fourth-round selection in this year's draft as part of their Deflategate punishment. They acquired a fourth-round pick from the Seahawks last year. Because that would have been the higher of their two selections, that's the one they'll lose. They will make their own fourth-round pick at No. 137 overall.