Brady says high production is expected result

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Brady says high production is expected result

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com Patriots Insider Follow @tomecurran
FOXBORO - Tom Brady's won back-to-back AFC Offensive Player of the Week awards. He's thrown for 940 yards. That is what happens, he explains, when his job is correctly performed. "We got opportunities to throw the ball," said Brady. "When my number's called upon, I try to execute. When the running backs' number's called upon, they try to execute. The offensive line always has to execute . . . Offense is about everybody really being on the same page."It takes a lot to wow Brady at this point.It's been nearly 10 years since he grabbed his temples and smilingly shook his head after winning the Super Bowl MVP award in February 2002. He's done stuff since. A couple of Player of the Week honors aren't going to make his pulse race. He continues to explain the offense isa group project. "It's a collective effort," said Brady. "The better Wes Welker does, the better it is for Chad Ochocinco and Deion Branch and for Rob Gronkowski and for Aaron Hernandez . . . The better the running game, the better it is for play-action pass. Everything feeds off one another. It's not one guy doing it."Brady did have an interesting answer when asked about the ability to make changes at the line and get the offenseout of bad plays and into better ones. "It's preparation, but it's by the entire offense," he said. "I could see something, but if I can't figure out a way to communicate that or -- ifI do figure out a way to communicate that -- guys don't understand what I'm trying to get across at theline of scrimmageor in the huddle then it's not worth it for me to try to do something. I can communicate something, but if theyre not studying on the other hand, then its not going to work out; theres not going to be any cohesiveness within the receiver group or tight end group."This helps explain why there is much, much more to playing successfully in the Patriots offense than simply being fast and having good hands. It's as evolved an offensive approach as the NFL's ever seen. "I love to be able to identify the defenses that Im going to see," he continued. "I love to be able to study and prepare and take things that I see on the film and then use those when I get them in the game, and then try to get us into the right play, but those other guys are studying just as hard as I am trying to understand that, Okay, Tom is going to change it, this is why hes going to change it, this is what hes going to change it to, so they can anticipate those things as well. So, there are maybe three or four things they may be looking for, as opposed to 50 things and then they can play that much quicker."So if there's a talented receiver whose ability to learn the offense or feel comfortable in it is lagging, this could be the reason.Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran.

Cyrus Jones: 'I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to'

Cyrus Jones: 'I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to'

It was a tough rookie season for Cyrus Jones after being selected by the New England Patriots in the second round of the the 2016 NFL Draft.

Despite struggling in the return game all season and being inactive for the playoffs, Jones will forever the labeled as a "Super Bowl Champion" after his team's victory over the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI.

But you won't hear Jones bragging about the victory.

"I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to," Jones told Childs Walker of the The Baltimore Sun. "I was part of the team, but I didn't feel a part of it."

The 23-year-old rookie played in 10 games for the Patriots, seeing 147 snaps on defense. But his struggles in the return game were a talking point for most of the season after he came in with such high expectations as a returner out of Alabama. 

"Honestly, it was hell for me," he explained. "That's the only way I can describe it. I didn't feel I deserved to be part of anything that was happening with the team. I felt embarrassed that these people probably thought they wasted a pick on me."

Jones has already turned the page on his rookie season saying, there's "no such thing as an offseason" because he "didn't earn it."

Robert Kraft profiled on this week's 'Real Sports' on HBO

Robert Kraft profiled on this week's 'Real Sports' on HBO

Robert Kraft is a bit taken aback when he walks into a room at Gillette Stadium and sees the Patriots' five Lombardi trophies lined up.

"Wow. That's the first time I've seen five trophies there," he tells Andrea Kremer on HBO's "Real Sports" in a interview that will air as part of this week's episode Tuesday at 10 p.m.

"A lot of people have their big dreams and get knocked down and don't have things go their way," Kraft says, "And you never give up hope and you really just hold on to it. Hard work and perserverance. You just keep getting up and getting up and then you get that breakthrough. I think that's what happened in overtime down in Houston. And that's lessons in life that are good for anyone." 

Here's an excerpt: