Brady on the injury he suffered Sunday: 'I've had worse'

tom-brady-sad-1-3-2016.jpg

Brady on the injury he suffered Sunday: 'I've had worse'

One day after suffering what appeared to be an ankle injury in the second quarter of New England's loss to Miami on Sunday, 20-10, Tom Brady told WEEI's Dennis and Callahan Show with Kirk Minihane that he was "all right."

"I’m doing all right," he said. "I’m doing all right. We’ll see how it goes this week. Sure there will be some treatment, as always. A lot of guys are banged up. Just part of football season."

Brady said that what he was dealing with wasn't anything markedly worse than plenty of other injuries he's suffered over the course of his career. The only injury that has forced Brady to miss any significant amount of time in his career was when he tore his ACL in the season-opener of the 2008 campaign. He also suffered an ankle injury in the AFC Championship Game in 2001.  

"I’ve had worse," Brady said on Monday morning. "I’ve had plenty of worse injuries than this one."

ESPN's Adam Schefter reported that Brady underwent an MRI on the ankle that revealed a sprain but no breaks, no fractures and he's expected to be ready for the Patriots playoff opener in Foxboro Jan. 16. 

In the WEEI interview, as Brady tried to downplay the ailment, he explained that there wasn't anything more important to him at the moment than feeling close to 100 percent. 

"Suh’s a big guy," Brady said. "He just came down on the back of me. Obviously however big he is — 300 pounds — he just kind of collapses on the back of your leg, there’s going to be some residual damage to that. It’s part of football.

"I’ll just work hard to get the right treatment. I’ve always dealt with injuries. I’m very confident I know how to deal with injuries. Believe me, I’ll be doing everything I can to be out there. There’s nothing else in my life that’s a priority at this point other than getting to feel like I’m a hundred percent."

Brady was asked if he would have been able to play had the Patriots been forced to compete this weekend. Thankfully, Brady replied, he doesn't have to worry about that. 

"I don’t know. We’ll see how it goes. I’ll just say I’m glad we have a week off," he said. "That obviously helps. I wanted to stay in there and play yesterday and see if I could do some stuff to help our team. We just couldn’t make enough plays. I feel like I’ve said that a lot the last six weeks, but we’re going to have to make more plays offensively if we want to keep advancing. It’s a challenge. You get every team’s best effort. They game-plan us. They’re trying to slow the things down that we do well. We’re going to have to in a way kind of reinvent how he [win], and do the things that we need to do to win the game."

Report: NFL paid Goodell over $31 million in 2015

roger-goodell-thumbs-up.jpg

Report: NFL paid Goodell over $31 million in 2015

Roger Goodell's salary has reportedly fallen in recent years, but he's still paid handsomely for his work as NFL commissioner.

According to the Associated Press, Goodell earned just over $31 million for 2015. That's a seven percent decrease from the $34 million he received for 2014. 

The NFL's last tax return served as an indicator of Goodell's 2015 salary. The league's tax returns no longer have to be made public since it has changed its status from exempt to taxable, per the AP.

The next-highest paid executive at the NFL offices on Park Avenue? General counsel Jeff Pash, one of the most prominent players in the Deflategate sage, who earned $6.5 million in 2015, down from $7.5 million in 2014. 

Richardson suspended one game for violating personal conduct policy

sheldon-richardson.jpg

Richardson suspended one game for violating personal conduct policy

The NFL announced this week that Jets defensive lineman Sheldon Richardson has been suspended without pay for Week 1 of the 2016 regular season for violating the league's personal conduct policy. 

Richardson will miss his team's season-opener against the Bengals and will be eligible to return to the Jets active roster on Sep. 12. The Jets and the Patriots meet for the first of their two division games on Nov. 27. 

Richardson responded to the news of suspension on Thursday. 

In July of 2015, Richardson led police on a high-speed chase -- hitting speeds as high as 143 miles per hour -- in suburban St. Louis. Police reported a strong odor of marijuana in the car and inside found a loaded, semiautomatic handgun that was possessed legally. Richardson had a 12-year-old relative riding with him in his Bentley at the time of the incident.

In January, Richardson pleaded guilty to resisting arrest. Though he avoided jail time, he was sentenced to two years probation and 100 hours of community service. 

Richardson has been one of the league's best defensive linemen since entering the league as a first-rounder in 2013. He served a four-game suspension to start last season after violating the league's substance abuse policy.

PFF: Collins is 'the best linebacker in the AFC'

collins-gallery_0.jpg

PFF: Collins is 'the best linebacker in the AFC'

He may have been left off of the NFL Network's Top 100 list, but Jamie Collins isn't flying under the radar at Pro Football Focus.

On PFF's list of the top 10 defensive players in the AFC, the Patriots linebacker came in at No. 8 and was given the description as the top linebacker in the conference.

Collins' versatility within the confines of the Patriots defense is what makes him so valuable, PFF's John Kosko explains: 

"He doesn’t dominate in any one role like Luke Kuechly does in pass coverage and run defense, but he is very good at all facets of the game. Collins has the athleticism to cover TEs and HBs effectively, the explosiveness to rush the passer, and the size and strength to defend the run. 

"The former Southern Mississippi linebacker is arguably the most versatile player in the NFL, and allows Bill Belichick to employ a defense that confuses opposing quarterbacks. With the only knock against Collins being his 34 missed tackles the past two seasons, the Patriot is the best linebacker in the AFC."

Collins graded out as the No. 5 linebacker in football last year, per PFF's numbers. He ranked behind only Carolina's Luke Kuechly, Minnesota's Anthony Barr, Indianapolis' Jerrell Freeman and Seattle's KJ Wright. 

Fellow Patriots linebacker Dont'a Hightower earned the 10th-highest grade for linebackers last season, according to PFF -- a grade that likely would have been higher had his snap-count (602 in 2015) approached that of Collins (792).

While Collins is a rare physical talent, the argument could be made that it's Hightower who is the more important player to the Patriots defense given his prowess as a pass-rusher and run-defender. He also has myriad responsibilities as the extension of the team's coaching staff in the defensive huddle. 

In order to slow down opposing passing games, many Patriots defensive packages employ either five or six defensive backs and just two linebackers. Lucky for them, they have two of the best in the conference.

Both Collins and Hightower are entering contract years this year, and finding a way to keep them in-house figures to be near the top of the list of priorities for the Patriots front office.