Belichick: Playoff experience can help some

947587.jpg

Belichick: Playoff experience can help some

When select members of the Texans agreed their previous meeting with the Patriots was the biggest game in team history, how many eyebrows do you figure went arching in the Patriots locker room?

Even though the Patriots are littered with young players, anybody who's been in New England longer than three seasons has already played in five playoff games, including a Super Bowl. Tom Brady alone has quarterbacked 1.75 seasons worth of playoff football and the Patriots are 17-7 in those games.

On Monday, Bill Belichick acknowledged that the experience could help New England. With, of course, the requisite caveats attached.

"I think (experience) has some (relevance) but I dont think it is overriding by any means," said Belichick. "You can find plenty of examples of teams and players with limited experience that have done very well and plenty of those same examples where it hasnt gone so well.

"But I think like anything else, if youve been through it once you have a little more knowledge and a little more confidence and understanding of whats going to happen than if youve never been through it before," Belichick added. "I think there is some advantage to it but I think the advantage goes to the team that plays well, that executes well, makes good decisions. I think thats more of an advantage than experience or no experience."

Matt Schaub has quarterbacked one playoff game in his nine-year career, Saturday's win over the Bengals. For the Texans, that was indeed their quarterback's first rodeo. If he can't hold up on the road, in the cold at Gillette Stadium less than a month after coming out somnambulant in December, the Texans have no chance.

Cyrus Jones: 'I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to'

Cyrus Jones: 'I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to'

It was a tough rookie season for Cyrus Jones after being selected by the New England Patriots in the second round of the the 2016 NFL Draft.

Despite struggling in the return game all season and being inactive for the playoffs, Jones will forever the labeled as a "Super Bowl Champion" after his team's victory over the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI.

But you won't hear Jones bragging about the victory.

"I'll never take credit for something I don't feel I contributed to," Jones told Childs Walker of the The Baltimore Sun. "I was part of the team, but I didn't feel a part of it."

The 23-year-old rookie played in 10 games for the Patriots, seeing 147 snaps on defense. But his struggles in the return game were a talking point for most of the season after he came in with such high expectations as a returner out of Alabama. 

"Honestly, it was hell for me," he explained. "That's the only way I can describe it. I didn't feel I deserved to be part of anything that was happening with the team. I felt embarrassed that these people probably thought they wasted a pick on me."

Jones has already turned the page on his rookie season saying, there's "no such thing as an offseason" because he "didn't earn it."

Robert Kraft profiled on this week's 'Real Sports' on HBO

Robert Kraft profiled on this week's 'Real Sports' on HBO

Robert Kraft is a bit taken aback when he walks into a room at Gillette Stadium and sees the Patriots' five Lombardi trophies lined up.

"Wow. That's the first time I've seen five trophies there," he tells Andrea Kremer on HBO's "Real Sports" in a interview that will air as part of this week's episode Tuesday at 10 p.m.

"A lot of people have their big dreams and get knocked down and don't have things go their way," Kraft says, "And you never give up hope and you really just hold on to it. Hard work and perserverance. You just keep getting up and getting up and then you get that breakthrough. I think that's what happened in overtime down in Houston. And that's lessons in life that are good for anyone." 

Here's an excerpt: