Boston Red Sox

Neely: Invitation to White House was 'an honor'

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Neely: Invitation to White House was 'an honor'

Cam Neely stuck to the team's party line -- that Tim Thomas has the right as an American citizen to choose not to attend an event at the White House -- but made it clear Tuesday that Thomas' beliefs, at least when it comes to the ceremony itself, are not his beliefs.
"As an honor. It was an honor," the Bruins president said on 'Felger and Mazz' when asked how he viewed the team's invitation to the White House by President Obama to celebrate their Stanley Cup championship. "Regardless of what your political views are, in my view it doesn't matter. You're getting invited by the current president to be honored as a team for your accomplishment as a team.
"I am very blessed that I'm in this country," added Neely, a Canadian native who now has dual citizenship (and whose wife and children are American).
Thomas -- in a Facebook post that he vows will be his only public statement on the subject -- claimed his snub was not directed at the president but at the growing reach of the federal government. Neely feels the goalie should have set his political beliefs aside.
"Certainly Tim has the right to have his feelings and express them how he wishes," Neely said, "but I felt this was a team event and it would have been nice for him to be a part of."
Thomas' teammates say the incident isn't going to affect them or their feelings for him, and Neely agrees.
"No, I don't believe so," he said when asked if it would be a locker-room problem. "For the most part, Tim has kept his views to himself . . . being in a locker room for as long as I have, and the age group the guys are, it's shocking to say there's not a lot of political talk."
He is, however, slightly worried about the future.
"I have concerns about how the incident and its aftermath is going to affect him," Neely said. "I certainly hope it won't . . .
"But he's a pretty strong-willed individual and he's had this me-against-the-world mentality through his career."

Chris Sale strikes out 11 in 4-0 win over Mariners

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Chris Sale strikes out 11 in 4-0 win over Mariners

SEATTLE - Chris Sale pitched seven innings of three-hit ball, top prospect Rafael Devers became the youngest Boston player to hit a home run in more than 50 years, and the Red Sox beat the Seattle Mariners 4-0 on Wednesday to salvage the final game of the series.

Barely 12 hours after the clubs wrapped up a five-hour, 13-inning marathon, the Red Sox got exactly what they needed from their ace to avoid being swept. The left-hander was masterful, striking out 11, the 14th time this season he had at least 10 strikeouts in a game. He allowed doubles to Jean Segura and Guillermo Heredia, and a broken-bat single to Ben Gamel, but none of the three to reach base via hit ever advanced.

Sale (13-4) has struck out at least nine batters in each of his 12 road starts this season, the longest streak dating to 1913.