Morning Skate: Friday, January 4, 2013

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Morning Skate: Friday, January 4, 2013

Michael Grange is kicking the crap out of this NHL lockout, and does it again with a great piece on the salary cap floor and the disagreement between the two sides.

Stu Hackel from the Red Light blog says that the mistrust between the two sides is bedeviling the CBA talks.

Teemu Selanne predicts that the end of the NHL lockout will be coming at the beginning of next week. If Selanne says it then Ill believe it for now.

My good buddy Tim Panaccio in Philadelphia says that expectations are low for today when it comes to CBA talks, and the current sessions going on with a federal mediator.

Great piece by Elliotte Friedman, who says that the bitterness is growing during an NHL labor waiting game thats trying the patience of even those that love and worship the game.

A nice piece on a Boston Herald interns recent visit to Comcast SportsNet New Englands Burlington studios on a night when I was co-hosting Sports Tonight.

Gary Lawless says that a source is claiming Gary Bettman will pull the plunger on the season if a deal isnt close to completion late next week.

For something completely different: an Oral History of Good Will Hunting in Boston Magazine thats probably the most interesting thing youll read this week.

Julien: 'The less said and the more shown' is good for Bruins right now

Julien: 'The less said and the more shown' is good for Bruins right now

BRIGHTON, Mass – Claude Julien met with the media after Tuesday’s morning skate and there was a bit of a long pause between questions at one point early in the session.

“I understand because everything that needs to be said has already been said, right?” cracked the longtime Bruins bench boss, who was in good spirits after morning skate despite the turmoil around him.

It’s clearly less about words and more about results right now for a struggling team that’s lost a season-worst four games in a row in gut-punching fashion and has fallen out of a playoff position despite teams above them, Ottawa and Toronto, holding five games in hand on them. 

The Bruins are in a freefall at the worst possible time and at this point, Julien wants to see positive action and winning results from his team rather than the empty talk with the media.

“We want to respect our game plan, execute it well and that normally helps you. We’ve been a little bit all over the place, especially in the last game,” said Julien. “That’s what we addressed yesterday, moving forward.

“I haven’t used the All-Star break as a motivation. We’re basically looking at these last two games, and what we have to do in these last two games. I think we’re well aware of what’s waiting for them after that. The players normally know when the breaks are. That’s not for us right now. I’d like to see our focus on what we need to do [against the Wings] to right the ship. We’ve talked about it a lot, and I think right now the less said, and the more shown is probably the best thing.”

With two games left until the All-Star break, one has to wonder what Julien’s fate will be if the Bruins drop both games to Detroit and Pittsburgh before the group breaks up for All-Star weekend. 

A good showing might be enough to keep Julien calling the shots for the Black and Gold down the stretch this season. But the sense is that more of the same fragile, losing efforts from the Bruins in these final two home dates, a familiar look from this group over the past three seasons, could spell doom for the winningest coach in Bruins franchise history.

One thing is for sure: Words aren’t going to do anything for Julien, and instead it’s about cold, hard results for the coach and the Bruins players who are nose-diving in the middle of the regular season.