Meet the jurors in the re-trial of Roger Clemens

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Meet the jurors in the re-trial of Roger Clemens

From Comcast SportsNetThumbnail sketches of the jurors who will decide whether pitcher Roger Clemens lied to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs. The information comes from public statements by the jurors themselves during jury selection in the case last week. U.S. Judge Reggie Walton told the jurors not to have any exposure to media coverage of the case. It was not immediately disclosed which four are alternates.------Seat 1: Female, single, supermarket cashier for five years. Says, "I'm not a big fan of sports, period." Never heard of Clemens, and says, "If he did indulge, I believe he should be penalized."Seat 2: Female, plays golf, not a baseball fan, but watches golf, tennis and the Super Bowl. Recently retired, she has worked at an association for psychologists and as an elementary school teacher.Seat 3: Female, program analyst with Washington, D.C., Department of Human Services since 2000. Took prelaw classes and considered going to law school. Never heard of Clemens and doesn't follow sports. Loves to read and bake.Seat 4: Female, occupational therapist. Attended two baseball games in her life, both in Washington -- one at old Griffith Stadium and one at Nationals Park. Not a baseball fan.Seat 5: Male, studied engineering and bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Hockey fan, likes long-distance running and working out. Knows a lot of people who took performance-enhancing drugs, but says PEDs were not for him. Thought 2008 congressional hearings on steroids were "excessive."Seat 6: Female, curatorial researcher at the Smithsonian, not a sports fan. On 2008 congressional hearings on steroids, she said, "At the time, I felt maybe that was not the best use of Congress' time when they have so many other things to deal with."Seat 7: Male, heard of Clemens but said he couldn't identify what position he played. Testified before Congress several times, most recently on cyber legislation, representing financial sector. Now an official at the U.S. Treasury Department. Went to Yale School of Management.Seat 8: Female, teaches deaf and hard of hearing, from Buffalo. Likes photography and fabric art. Not a sports fan, doesn't know Clemens.Seat 9: Male, works as administrative assistant at Canadian embassy (next door to the courthouse). Worked at life insurance company. Was a premed student at Howard University. Speaks French and Spanish. Not a baseball fan. Asked about Clemens' 2008 congressional testimony, he said Clemens "seemed forthright."Seat 10: Female, goes to one baseball game a year. Not a sports fan. Works at American Council on Education as librarian and in continuing education. Likes classical music, cooking vegetarian food and "light philosophy." Not a sports fan.Seat 11: Male, unemployed 27-year-old who said his reaction to jury duty was "No, no, no, no, no," and that he'd rather be sleeping than in court. Likes basketball but not baseball and has never heard of Clemens. Promised to be "wide awake" if selected for jury.Seat 12: Male, retired, grew up in Germany, moved to U.S. at the age of 15 in 1946. Taught political science at University of Massachusetts-Amherst for 25 years, also taught at Smith. Didn't recognize Clemens' name; only sport he follows is soccer.Seat 13: Female, retiree, active in effort to get voting rights for D.C. Worked at U.S. Department of Transportation and Bureau of Public Debt. Said her husband told her, upon learning she might serve on this trial, "Get out of it, don't do it!," eliciting chuckle from Clemens.Seat 14: Female, environmental lawyer, ran cross-country and track in high school. Doesn't follow sports. Knew Clemens as a "well-regarded pitcher," but "didn't know he was connected to steroids."Seat 15: Male, says he grew up in River Edge, N.J., down the street from a house rented by New York Yankee stars Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris. Been going to gym since 1975, knows people who use steroids, calls it a "pretty stupid thing to do." Avid cyclist. Works as senior program analyst for Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Studied docket of Clemens case.Seat 16: Female, works in law enforcement with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, calls herself a "sharpshooter." When not working, sleeps and cooks a lot. Not a sports fan, and hadn't heard of Clemens.

Jerebko shoots, and shoves, and will get a chance to do both in Game 4

Jerebko shoots, and shoves, and will get a chance to do both in Game 4

CLEVELAND -- Back in 2009, a team official with the Pistons was trying to sell me on the idea that Jonas Jerebko, selected by Detroit in the second round that year with the 39th overall pick, was different. 
 
Big men from Europe back then had a reputation for being more finesse than forceful when on the floor, guys who would rather shoot than shove. 
 
“This kid, he’s different,” the official told me at the time. “He doesn’t mind mixing it up.”
 
While he is often praised for his ability to help stretch the floor with his long-range shooting, Jerebko’s desire to be physical at both ends of the floor is one of his strengths. 
 
As for those who don’t know that’s a big part of his game, Jerebko says, “They probably haven’t seen me play enough.”
 
That may change beginning with Game 4 against Cleveland. 
 
Boston’s Amir Johnson suffered a right shoulder injury after Cleveland’s Tristan Thompson appeared to have tugged on it while both were going for a rebound in Game 3. Johnson told CSN that he will meet with medical officials sometime today, and is questionable for Game 4.
 
If Johnson is unable to play, coach Brad Stevens will likely consider putting Jerebko in the starting lineup. 
 
Stevens made a similar move in the first round of the playoffs last season against the Atlanta Hawks, and the Celtics went 2-2 with Jerebko starting. 
 
 “I like to compete. I hate to lose, I love to win,” Jerebko told CSN. “So whatever it takes. If you have to play hard, you play hard. You got a lot of tough players out there. You gotta be one of them.”
 
He was just that in Game 3 as he came off the bench to score 10 points on a perfect 4-for-4 shooting display that included a go-ahead basket in the final minute of play.
 
“My job is to stay ready,” Jerebko said. “That’s all I can do; control what I can control and stay ready, be in the gym on a day like this and try to get better. Just stay in the gym and always be ready.”
 
His preparation in advance for big moments made the final minute of Game 3 just another game for him. 
 
Coming out of a time-out with 36.3 seconds to play, Avery Bradley penetrated deep into the paint, which sucked in four Cleveland defenders. 
 
At the last second, he kicked it out to a wide-open Jerebko, whose 22-footer with 30.3 seconds to play put the Celtics ahead 108-106.
 
“I wasn’t the first option but I knew I was going to be open,” Jerebko said. “I saw Avery looking at this corner and I saw my defender go in so I knew I would get a good shot. I was hoping Avery would kick it out and he did. It felt good.”
 
And his play has been good for the Celtics, seemingly whenever he has been called upon. 
 
Johnson has seen first-hand how Jerebko has handled his inconsistent role on the eve of him becoming an unrestricted free agent this summer. 
 
“You just have to do nothing but salute him,” Johnson told CSN. “Of just being professional, staying ready and that’s what veterans do; they stay ready and he gave us a big game in this playoff series. You have to respect his professionalism. I’m proud of him.”