Meet the jurors in the re-trial of Roger Clemens

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Meet the jurors in the re-trial of Roger Clemens

From Comcast SportsNetThumbnail sketches of the jurors who will decide whether pitcher Roger Clemens lied to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs. The information comes from public statements by the jurors themselves during jury selection in the case last week. U.S. Judge Reggie Walton told the jurors not to have any exposure to media coverage of the case. It was not immediately disclosed which four are alternates.------Seat 1: Female, single, supermarket cashier for five years. Says, "I'm not a big fan of sports, period." Never heard of Clemens, and says, "If he did indulge, I believe he should be penalized."Seat 2: Female, plays golf, not a baseball fan, but watches golf, tennis and the Super Bowl. Recently retired, she has worked at an association for psychologists and as an elementary school teacher.Seat 3: Female, program analyst with Washington, D.C., Department of Human Services since 2000. Took prelaw classes and considered going to law school. Never heard of Clemens and doesn't follow sports. Loves to read and bake.Seat 4: Female, occupational therapist. Attended two baseball games in her life, both in Washington -- one at old Griffith Stadium and one at Nationals Park. Not a baseball fan.Seat 5: Male, studied engineering and bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Hockey fan, likes long-distance running and working out. Knows a lot of people who took performance-enhancing drugs, but says PEDs were not for him. Thought 2008 congressional hearings on steroids were "excessive."Seat 6: Female, curatorial researcher at the Smithsonian, not a sports fan. On 2008 congressional hearings on steroids, she said, "At the time, I felt maybe that was not the best use of Congress' time when they have so many other things to deal with."Seat 7: Male, heard of Clemens but said he couldn't identify what position he played. Testified before Congress several times, most recently on cyber legislation, representing financial sector. Now an official at the U.S. Treasury Department. Went to Yale School of Management.Seat 8: Female, teaches deaf and hard of hearing, from Buffalo. Likes photography and fabric art. Not a sports fan, doesn't know Clemens.Seat 9: Male, works as administrative assistant at Canadian embassy (next door to the courthouse). Worked at life insurance company. Was a premed student at Howard University. Speaks French and Spanish. Not a baseball fan. Asked about Clemens' 2008 congressional testimony, he said Clemens "seemed forthright."Seat 10: Female, goes to one baseball game a year. Not a sports fan. Works at American Council on Education as librarian and in continuing education. Likes classical music, cooking vegetarian food and "light philosophy." Not a sports fan.Seat 11: Male, unemployed 27-year-old who said his reaction to jury duty was "No, no, no, no, no," and that he'd rather be sleeping than in court. Likes basketball but not baseball and has never heard of Clemens. Promised to be "wide awake" if selected for jury.Seat 12: Male, retired, grew up in Germany, moved to U.S. at the age of 15 in 1946. Taught political science at University of Massachusetts-Amherst for 25 years, also taught at Smith. Didn't recognize Clemens' name; only sport he follows is soccer.Seat 13: Female, retiree, active in effort to get voting rights for D.C. Worked at U.S. Department of Transportation and Bureau of Public Debt. Said her husband told her, upon learning she might serve on this trial, "Get out of it, don't do it!," eliciting chuckle from Clemens.Seat 14: Female, environmental lawyer, ran cross-country and track in high school. Doesn't follow sports. Knew Clemens as a "well-regarded pitcher," but "didn't know he was connected to steroids."Seat 15: Male, says he grew up in River Edge, N.J., down the street from a house rented by New York Yankee stars Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris. Been going to gym since 1975, knows people who use steroids, calls it a "pretty stupid thing to do." Avid cyclist. Works as senior program analyst for Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Studied docket of Clemens case.Seat 16: Female, works in law enforcement with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, calls herself a "sharpshooter." When not working, sleeps and cooks a lot. Not a sports fan, and hadn't heard of Clemens.

Tom Brady on Donald Trump: 'I certainly disagree with what he said'

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Tom Brady on Donald Trump: 'I certainly disagree with what he said'

After beating the Texans on Sunday, 36-33, Tom Brady didn't want to delve too deeply into what went into his locking arms with teammates during the national anthem. 

"I just think," Brady said, "there's just a great love for my teammates."

He didn't want to get into Donald Trump's comments about players kneeling for the anthem, but he was willing to go there during Monday's Kirk and Callahan Show on WEEI.

"Yeah, I certainly disagree with what he said," Brady explained. "I thought it was just divisive. Like I said, I just want to support my teammates. I am never one to say, ‘Oh, that is wrong. That is right.’ I do believe in what I believe in. I believe in bringing people together and respect and love and trust. Those are the values that my parents instilled in me. That is how I try and live every day.

"I have been blessed to be in locker rooms with guys all over the United States over the course of my career. Some of my great friends are from Florida, Virginia, New York, Montana, Colorado, Texas. The one thing about football is it brings so many guys together -- guys you would never have the opportunity to be around. Whether it was in college, and all the way into the pros. We’re all different, we’re all unique. That is what makes us all special."

Brady was one of several players locking arms on the Patriots sideline for the anthem. More than a dozen others, including Devin McCourty, took a knee. Just before and immediately after the anthem, fans booed the demonstration.

"I think everyone has the right to do whatever they want to do," Brady said of the response. "If you don’t agree, that is fine. You can voice your disagreement, I think that is great. It’s part of our democracy. As long as it is done in a peaceful, respectful way, that is what our country has been all about."

Curran: In the end, everyone stood because of the game

Curran: In the end, everyone stood because of the game

FOXBORO – The boos and demands to “Stand up!” rained down just as the Star Spangled Banner began. The players on the Patriots sideline who knelt – the ones boos and invective was directed at – stayed down. Others stood, locking arms with teammates while others stood with their hands over their hearts.

By game’s end, everyone was on their feet. Players. Coaches. Fans. Together.

Unless they left early because of traffic and a late Patriots deficit. Or because they couldn’t bear the thought of watching an NFL game on a beautiful September Sunday because the entertainers didn’t do what they wanted them to do before the performance began.

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The whole thing’s complicated. I understand why people take offense at those who don’t stand for the anthem.

I understand why others want to deliver a symbolic message about their American experience.

I completely understand why, two days after President Trump thought it appropriate to use the phrase “son of a bitch” to refer to someone making a silent, reflective statement, many NFL players felt challenged, backed into a corner and somewhat dehumanized. The message delivered was, in essence, “Shut up and dance.”

Personally, I prefer to stick to sports. I don’t think I’m equipped to talk politics because I don’t know policy, legislation, constituencies and special interests – all the things that I define as politics – well enough to drone on at anybody.

As for sociology – which is what this is about rather than politics – I have my experiences and others have theirs. I’m trying to mow my own lawn over here. You do you. I’ll do me. As long as you don’t encroach on me doing me while you do you, I’m fine. When I’m not completely self-absorbed, a respectful exchange of ideas can make me see things in a different light.

It didn’t surprise me some people at Gillette Stadium had a visceral and vocal reaction to players kneeling. The pot was brought to a boil all weekend, the lid was just lifted and it bubbled over.

But the irony of how the afternoon played out – that Brandin Cooks, a player booing fans were screaming at to stand three hours earlier brought them to their feet with his toe-tapping last-minute touchdown – was perfectly symbolic.

Ultimately, everyone was there for the football – the players, coaches, media and fans – and in the end it was the football that brought the unified response that stood in contrast to the divided reactions in the stands and on the field before the game.

“That’s what sports is,” said Patriots safety Devin McCourty. “That’s what sports does. That’s what makes them great. They bring out what we have in common.

“I don’t think people look at us as human,” McCourty said. “I don’t think they ever have. We’re just the entertainment. They don’t understand that there’s a human behind it. People want to shake your hand or have their picture taken with you but they don’t want to know you. That’s reality.”

Maybe. Or maybe people feel their voices aren’t heard. They don’t have a column they can write or a TV or radio show to spout off on. They don’t have the chance to demonstrate their individual feelings at their cubicle before the workday starts.

All they know is they spent $500 or more to get to and into with a belly full of steak tips and beer and they don’t need to feel like being reminded about somebody else’s societal oppression on their day off, thank you very much.

It’s not so much about who does what during the Star Spangled Banner as much as it is that a lot of people don’t appreciate the intrusion. That, and they’re tired of hearing how bad everyone else has it when it’s really no damn picnic for most people these days.

Believe me, there’s not unanimity of opinion in the Patriots locker room any more than there is in your office, home, dorm or neighborhood. Players of different races, backgrounds, economic circumstances and ways of expressing themselves are thrown in a pot together and told to work for a common goal and rely on each other.

The mish-mash of ways in which players responded during the anthem on the Patriots sideline, the reticence of some players to dip a toe in the conversation, McCourty’s opening statement at the podium and then his declining to take questions and Bill Belichick’s comment that he would “deal with that later” all seemed to indicate that the team itself is still working through how it expresses itself as a whole.

It’s complicated for them too.

But in the end, it was the football that bound them together. It was the game that left them jumping on each other and the fans standing and screaming and nobody thinking at all about who did what when the song played before the game.

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