McAdam: Lackey situation could mimic Burnett's

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McAdam: Lackey situation could mimic Burnett's

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Everything the New York Yankees do manages to catch the attention of the Red Sox. That's just how things work with the two rivals.

But the Yankees' move over the weekend may have had the Red Sox paying even more attention than usual.

After a week or so of negotiations, the Yankees finally agreed to send A.J. Burnett to the Pittsburgh Pirates in exchange for two mid-level prospects.

To facilitate the deal, the Yankees included 13 million to help the Pirates pay the remaining 33 million still owed to Burnett over the next two seasons.

And why does this move affect the Red Sox? Simple: sometime in the future, the Red Sox may want to do the very same with John Lackey.

Lackey and Burnett have a lot of common. Each signed essentially the same exact contract -- five years, 82.5 million -- within a year of each other.

Each has been a big disappointment after signing the deal. Burnett was 34-35 with a 4.79 ERA in three seasons with the Yankees; Lackey was 26-23 with a 5.26 ERA in his first two seasons with the Sox.

After acquiring Hiroki Kuroda and Michael Pineda, the Yankees viewed Burnett as a spare (if expensive) part and were determined to move him.

They'll subsidize Burnett, taking on nearly 40 percent of his salary this season and next.

The Red Sox may well do the same with Lackey.

The one key difference, of course, is that Lackey is likely sidelined for the entire 2012 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery last October. By contrast, Burnett was at least healthy at the time of the move.

However, the surgical procedure could, in time, help the Red Sox in their efforts to move Lackey's contract. While Tommy John surgery is a major procedure, it's not career-threatening the way it once was. Every year, pitchers come back from the surgery, often with improved velocity.

Also, the Sox can make the case that Lackey's performance was so poor in 2011 because he was pitching most of the season with a torn ligament in his elbow.

By definition, Lackey almost has to be better when he returns from surgery.

Finally, thanks to a clause in Lackey's original deal, the Red Sox have another contractual edge. The deal included language which stated that if Lackey were to miss a season because of an elbow injury, the Sox would in turn get a sixth year tacked on for the major league minimum salary.

That means that, when Lackey shows he's healthy, the Sox can tell teams that they'll be getting three seasons worth of Lackey at just under 33 million, rather than the two the Pirates are getting for the same amount.

That's a huge advantage financially, since the third year also manages to bring down the average annual value (AAV) of the deal from about 16 million annually to 11 million. Such a deal keeps payroll down when MLB computes the luxury tax liability for each club.

Of course, the Red Sox' priority is for Lackey to return from surgery and be the 15-game, 200-inning pitcher they thought they were getting when they signed him as a free agent.

That's a far more efficient path, since, like the Yankees, they would have to pay a good portion of Lackey's remaining money for him not to pitch for them.

As the Yankees found in obtaining two lower-level prospects from Pittsburgh, the return won't be great. The only way the Sox will get more than the Yankees got is if they decide to take back more money. The more salary wiped off the books, the higher the asking price can be.

A best-case scenario might work like this: Lackey comes back healthy in 2013, pitches reasonably well (double figures in wins, an ERA around 4.00), but the Sox determine he will never truly flourish in Boston.

They could then shop him after the 2013 season and offer him around with two years remaining at 16.5 million (16 million for the final year on the original deal and another 500,000 or so in 2015). The Sox could pay 6 million or so of that and get something halfway decent in return.

It's not much, but halfway through a deal they surely have come to regret, it's about all they have.

Tiger Woods arrested for DUI in Jupiter, Florida

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Tiger Woods arrested for DUI in Jupiter, Florida

Tiger Woods, recovering from his fourth back surgery in the last three years, was arrested on DUI charges Monday morning in Jupiter, Fla.

Woods, 41, is the winner of 79 PGA tournaments in his career (including 14 majors). He was stopped this morning at around 3 a.m. and booked at 7:18 a.m. He was released on his own recognizance at 10:50 a.m.

Physical problems have plagued Woods in recent years, but he said last week "unequivocally, I want to play professional golf again." However, he will need months to recover from his most recent surgery.

Get the latest on this story from golfchannel.com

Bradley's emergence as vocal leader speaks volumes about growth

Bradley's emergence as vocal leader speaks volumes about growth

BOSTON –  Terry Rozier was having a rough stretch where his minutes were limited and when he did play, he didn’t play particularly well.
 
Among the voices in his ear offering words of encouragement was Avery Bradley who knows all too well what Rozier was going through.
 
For all his time as a Celtic, Bradley has let his work on the floor do the talking for him.
 
But as the most tenured Celtic on the roster, his leadership has to be about more than just getting the job done, but servicing as a vocal leader as well.
 
For a player whose growth from one year to the next has been a constant, being a more vocal leader has been the one dynamic of his game that has improved the most during this past season.
 
And it is that kind of leadership that will carry into the summer what is a pivotal offseason for both Bradley and this Celtics franchise which was eliminated by Cleveland in the Conference finals, the first time the Celtics got that deep in the playoffs since 2012.
 
He is entering the final year of the four-year, $32 million contract he signed in 2014. And it comes at a time when his fellow Tacoma, Wash. native and backcourt mate Isaiah Thomas will likely hit free agency where he’s expected to command a max or near-max contract that would pay him an annual salary in the neighborhood of $30 million.
 
At this point in time, Bradley isn’t giving too much thought to his impending contract status.
 
Instead, he’s more consumed by finding ways to improve his overall game and in doing so, help guide the Celtics to what has to be their focus for next season – a trip to the NBA Finals.
 
While Celtics players have said their focus has always been on advancing as far into the playoffs as possible, it wasn’t until this past season did they actually provide hope and promise that Banner 18 may be closer than you think.
 
It was an emotional time for the Celtics, dealing with the unexpected death of Chyna Thomas, the younger sister of Isaiah Thomas, just hours before Boston’s first playoff game this season.
 
And then there were injuries such as Thomas’ right hip strain that ended his postseason by halftime of Boston’s Eastern Conference finals matchup with Cleveland.
 
But through that pain, we saw the emergence of Bradley in a light we have seldom seen him in as a Celtic.
 
We have seen him play well in the past, but it wasn’t until Thomas’ injury did we see Bradley showcase even more elements of his game that had been overlooked.
 
One of the constant knocks on Bradley has been his ball-handling.
 
And yet there were a number of occasions following Thomas’ playoff-ending injury, where Bradley attacked defenders off the dribble and finished with lay-ups and an occasional dunk in transition.
 
Among players who appeared in at least 12 playoff games this year, only Washington’s John Wall (7.9), Cleveland’s LeBron James (6.8) and Golden State’s Stephen Curry (5.2) averaged more points in transition than Bradley (4.7).
 
Bradley recognized the team needed him to be more assertive, do things that forced him to be more front-and-center which is part of his evolution in Boston as a leader on this team.
 
“It’s weird but players like Al (Horford) definitely helped me get out of my shell and pushed me this year to be more of a vocal leader,” Bradley said.
 
And that talent combined with Bradley doing what he does every offseason – come back significantly better in some facet of his game – speaks to how he’s steadily growing into being a leader whose actions as well as his words are impactful.