Marlins ship Hanley Ramirez to the West Coast

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Marlins ship Hanley Ramirez to the West Coast

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- The Los Angeles Dodgers have worked out a multiplayer trade to acquire former NL batting champion Hanley Ramirez from Miami, the second big deal in as many days for the disappointing Marlins. A person familiar with the trade told The Associated Press about the swap on condition of anonymity because there was no official announcement. The Dodgers will also get reliever Randy Choate while the Marlins will receive pitcher Nathan Eovaldi and a minor leaguer. Multiple media outlets reported the deal late Tuesday night. The deadline to make trades without waivers is next Tuesday, and several stars including Ichiro Suzuki, Wandy Rodriguez and Kevin Youkilis already have been on the move to contending teams. A day after the Marlins sent pitcher Anibal Sanchez and infielder Omar Infante to the Detroit Tigers for pitching prospect Jacob Turner and two minor leaguers, Miami traded with another playoff hopeful. The 28-year-old Ramirez is hitting .246 with 14 home runs and 47 RBIs, far from his big season in 2009 when he hit .342 with 24 homers and 106 RBIs. The All-Star shifted from shortstop to third base this season to make room for newly acquired Jose Reyes. Ramirez and the Marlins have fallen short of expectations this year. Miami lost 4-3 to Atlanta on Tuesday night and dropped to 45-52. The Dodgers lost at St. Louis 8-2 and are 2 games behind NL West-leading San Francisco. Los Angeles got off to a terrific start this season, but hit a skid and fell out of first place. Ramirez could play either spot on the left side of the infield for the Dodgers. Dee Gordon is currently on the disabled list with a torn ligament in his right thumb that could sideline him until mid-August, and is batting only .229 with 17 RBIs. The Dodgers haven't gotten much production from their third basemen, with Juan Uribe batting just .190 with two homers and 17 RBIs and others doing little at the spot. Choate, a 36-year-old lefty, is 0-0 with one save and a 2.49 ERA in 44 games. He began his big league career with the New York Yankees in 2000 and also has pitched for Arizona and Tampa Bay. Eovaldi, a 22-year-old righty, is 1-6 with a 4.15 ERA. He made his major league debut last season.

Drellich: MLB could explain umpire rulings more often

Drellich: MLB could explain umpire rulings more often

BOSTON — We know that Red Sox manager John Farrell did something wrong. In the absence of any sort of formal announcement otherwise, we’re left to assume the umpires did everything properly — but there’s room for MLB to make that clearer.

If the NBA can put out Last 2 Minute reports, why can’t MLB provide more regular explanations or reviews of contested calls?

Farrell on Tuesday said he’d like to see more public accountability in the umpiring realm, hours before the manager was to sit out Game No. 77. Farrell was suspended one game for making contact with crew chief Bill Miller on Saturday night as manager and umpire rained spittle on each other over a balk call that went against the Sox.

Well, was it a balk or not? Did Miller do anything wrong as well?

“I don’t know if there was anything levied on the other side,” Farrell said. “I don’t know that.”

But would he like such matters to always be public?

“I think there have been strides made in that way,” Farrell said. “I guess I would. I think everyone in uniform would prefer that to be made public. Whether or not that happens, I don’t know, but that would be a choice I would make.”

The league has a thorough internal review system. But it is just that: internal. Most of the time, any way.

On most every night at Fenway Park, there is someone on hand watching just the umpires and reviewing them.

MLB, to its credit, has announced suspensions for umpires in the past. The league has made public acknowledgments when calls have been made incorrectly. More of that seems viable — even if it’s an announcement to reaffirm that the call was made and handled properly, and here are the reasons why.

“I haven’t received any further determination or review of what transpired,” Farrell said. “My position, my stance, remains steadfast. I still firmly believe that time was called [before the balk call was made]. I wasn’t arguing the balk. I was arguing the timing of it. As I reiterated today to those that I spoke with, I still stand by my side of the argument. Unfortunately, there was contact made.”