Lesson learned for Bobby V.

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Lesson learned for Bobby V.

Last night, on the Bobby Valentine Show

Tom Caron: So, Bobby. Hows it been managing a guy like Dustin Pedroia this season? Coachs dream, right?

Valentine: Oh yeah, you know. Dustins been great. Hes really getting out there and leading this club, and really does just about everything you need.

Caron: Yup. That sounds about ri

Valentine: The thing about Dustin, though. Hes just so small.

Caron: OK, th

Valentine: And I think thats going to hurt us at some point this season.

Caron: Umm. Wow, so do y

Valentine: All things being equal, I just like my second basemen a little taller Toby Harrah, Julio Franco, Edgardo Alfonzo. Thats just my preference. So when it comes to that position, well see what we can do about getting a little more size out there.

We now take you live to Fenway Park

Reporters: Bobby! Bobby! Have you spoken with Dustin this morning?

Valentine: Yes, yes. We spoke. And listen, this is such a misunderstanding. I explained that to him, and that was that. Were moving on.

Reporters: Bobby! What do you mean misunderstanding? You said he was too short . . .

Valentine: Guys, listen. You know, this has all been taken the wrong way. Honestly, I just thought I was answering a question. I never knew people would actually listen to the answer! This wasn't my intention, and I told Dustin that. Im not sure if he believes me, but thats the truth.

Reporters: But Bobby

Valentine: Heres the thing that you guys dont get, and what I explained to Dustin. I wasnt saying that hes too short. I said you know he was too small. Yeah, thats it. Its just that sometimes, he just uhh he crouches down a little too much out there. Right? You know, small? Hes ummm he makes himself so much smaller than he really is. And as a former middle infielder, you know, I just, uhhh, that just seems little inefficient. And thats what I meant. Id like him to be a little bit more upright. And moving forward, Im going to do my best to see if we cant get him to play a little taller.

Of course this didnt really happen.

But given the circus we watched unfold yesterday, its not too far-fetched, right?

Oh. It is?

OK, well then lets just move on.

Not back, to what actually happened yesterday, to all the bombs, back-tracking and confusion that filled Fenway Park. That story's way passed overkill anyway, and the truth is that we'll probably never get the truth. My guess is that it falls somewhere between our original assumption and Bobby's BS explanation. That his intentions were neither as malicious as everyone initially thought, nor as innocent as he ultimately claimed. But either way, it's time to move on.

Hell, the Texas Rangers are in town. The two-time defending AL champion Rangers. The 8-2, second-best-record-in-baseball Rangers. Not to mention, despite taking three of four from the Rays, the Sox are still only 4-6. They're still in last place.

This is an enormous series on the horizon, one that dwarfs, or at least should dwarf any petty behind-the-scenes drama between a loose-lipped manager and exceedingly malcontent veteran. So let's treat it that way. Let's put it in the past.

But as part of moving forward, let's also lay out one ground rule for any and all future Bobby Valentine-related drama:

Ignorance is no longer an excuse.

If he wants to keep doing things his way. That's cool. If he wants to lift the veil that Terry Francona had stapled to the floor of that clubhouse, hold players publicly accountable and give Boston and its fans an unfiltered perspective of what he sees in his team. All the power to him.

The Red Sox didn't bring him here to be Francona. For better or worse, they brought him here to be Bobby Valentine. So if Bobby Valentine thinks the best way to get his team to play for him and with each other is to continue making vague and enigmatic statements about his players in the media, then he should. He should do it his way and achieve the success he has planned for himself and this team, or go down guns blazing.

But he should never be surprised by the reaction.

"I never thought this would become a big deal."

"I wasn't trying to be critical."

"I should have said this."

"I really meant that."

It doesn't work. Not anymore. It barely worked yesterday.

If Valentine's as smart and aware as he'd like us to believe, then there's no longer any question in his mind as to what constitutes a "big deal" in Boston, as to what will be taken the wrong way, blown out of proportion and morphed into an immediate and enormous controversy.

Everything will.

He should have known that already. But has to know that now.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Does Butler want to be with Patriots beyond 2017? 'Whatever happens, happens'

Does Butler want to be with Patriots beyond 2017? 'Whatever happens, happens'

FOXBORO -- Malcolm Butler came off of the Gillette Stadium practice field to a gaggle of reporters who've been waiting to hear from him all offseason. There was speculation he'd be traded. There was speculation he might sign elsewhere as a restrcited free agent. 

In the rain, in front of a dozen or more microphones, following his team's third organized team activity practice, Butler was asked if he would like to be in New England beyond the 2017 season -- the final year of his contract. 

"Can't predict the future," he said. "Whatever happens, happens."

Butler was given several opportunities to say that he'd like to stick with the Patriots for the long term, but he was non-committal. 

More to come . . .

Morning Skate: Former PC coach Army on Avs' rough year

Morning Skate: Former PC coach Army on Avs' rough year

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while celebrating the 40th Anniversary of Star Wars being released today. Amazing that the power and influence of the best movie franchise in cinematic history are just as strong today as it was four decades ago. I still remember my first time seeing it as a very little kid with my parents at the dearly departed Starlight Drive-In in North Reading.

*Good guy and recently fired Colorado Avalanche assistant coach Tim Army talks about a rough past season with the Avs, and some of the difficulties they faced in a truly terrible season. The former Providence College head coach and good hockey man shouldn’t have much trouble finding his next gig.

*A great move by the Arizona Coyotes, who have hired former Bruins forward Craig Cunningham as a pro scout after his awful medical situation last season that resulted in his leg getting amputated. Cunningham is a hard worker and a hockey lifer, and that’s exactly the kind of traits that the best scouts have in huge amounts.

*The New Jersey Devils have fired a number of employees after a rough season, including a groundbreaking radio analyst.

*With the ultra-competitive demand for an edge in NHL player development, teams are beginning to look to Europe for more and more diamonds in the rough. The Bruins tried that with Joonas Kemppainen, but it didn’t work out so well.

*One of the real big advantages of the Nashville Predators getting to the Stanley Cup Final for the first time is a national spotlight getting flashed on PK Subban, who shows off his personality in a rare ESPN interview of a hockey player featured on the network's magazine show.

*Ryan Johansen isn’t done talking smack to Ryan Kesler after the Predators prevailed over the Ducks, and it’s some delicious playoff hatred.

*Is the NHL ready to draft another goaltender with the last name DiPietro in the first round? Inquiring minds want to know, but I’d recommend the New York Islanders take a pass just in the name of avoiding a repeat of some bad history for them.

*Taylor Hall sounds pretty bitter about the whole “Edmonton Oilers getting into the playoff without him” thing, doesn’t he?

*For something completely different: As mentioned above, it’s a milestone birthday for the Star Wars franchise hitting 40 years old today. Boy, this Boston Globe movie review was right on the money back in 1977.