How late did Roger Federer's match go?

532440.jpg

How late did Roger Federer's match go?

From Comcast SportsNet Tuesday, September 6, 2011
NEW YORK (AP) -- Roger Federer waited at the U.S. Open for hours, eager to get on court for his fourth-round match. Once he finally started playing, shortly before midnight, he didn't take long to win. Still, Federer enjoyed each of the 82 minutes he needed to hit 14 aces -- including four in one game -- and generally overwhelm 36th-ranked Juan Monaco of Argentina 6-1, 6-2, 6-0 in a match that ended shortly before 1:15 a.m. on Tuesday. "Other sports start at 8 in the morning, like golf. It's crazy how our schedules change all the time. As tennis players, it makes it extremely difficult to be on your 'A' game every single day," said Federer, whose record 16 Grand Slam titles include five at the U.S. Open. He watched some of the match before his in Arthur Ashe Stadium -- No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki's victory over No. 15 Svetlana Kuznetsova, which lasted 3 hours, 2 minutes -- and also warmed up several times, grabbed a bite to eat, and tried to relax. "Your body is also jumping out of your skin because you want to go, then you're held back again," he said. "It's tough." There was the matter of the mist that started falling early in the third set, raising the possibility of a rain delay -- or even a suspension of the match, with a resumption Tuesday afternoon. "There was not much margin there for us because it was already so late," Federer said. "So one rain delay and probably they would have sent everybody home." The third-seeded Swiss had 42 winners and only 21 unforced errors against Monaco in a match that took 1 hour, 22 minutes, less than half the time it took Wozniacki to get through. As late as Federer-Monaco ended, it doesn't even rank among the 10 latest-finishing matches in tournament history. The record: 2:26 a.m., for a Sept. 4, 1993, match in which Mats Wilander beat Mikael Pernfors. Given all the time-wasting before he got on court, Federer liked the way he played. "I'm extremely pleased with my reaction out there," he said. "I played really well, crisp, nice. I felt fantastic." Federer played brilliantly right from the start, taking the first five games -- and 20 of the first 25 points -- in only 12 minutes. He didn't miss a beat in the second set, hitting four aces in his opening service game. "Roger was playing unbelievable. I didn't have time to play," Monaco said. "The ball was coming very fast, he was serving unbelievable and I couldn't be quick like I can be in most of my matches." But he also blamed himself for not preparing properly. "Maybe I made a mistake: I warmed up about five hours before the match. We'd been waiting for four hours in the locker room," Monaco said. "I got on the court, I'm feeling a little tight. Then during the match, it takes me some time to feel my legs." Federer reached his 30th consecutive major quarterfinal. He also earned a rematch against 11th-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, who pulled off a stunner in the Wimbledon quarterfinals two months ago by becoming the first man to beat Federer in a Grand Slam match after dropping the first two sets. "It's sure something I'm looking forward to. Look, I live for the big matches, live for playing a guy who is explosive, has got some firepower," Federer said. "I like to play those kind of players, especially now that we're in the deeper stages of the tournament."

WATCH: Celtics vs. Suns

WATCH: Celtics vs. Suns

Tune into CSN to watch the Celtics host the Wizards in a game with huge playoff-seeding implications. You can also click here to watch the Celtics livestream presented by McDonald's on the NBC Sports App. Coverage begins at 7 p.m. with Celtics Pregame Live Presented by ACE Ticket.

- Game Preview: C's focused on Suns, not playoff seeding

- Channel Finder: Make sure you know where to watch

[SHOP: Gear up, Celtics fans!]

- Live Extra FAQ: All your questions answered

- Latest on the Celtics: All of the most recent news and notes

- Talk about the game via social media on CSN's Pulse, presented by Ford

 

Jones-Molina WBC spat is a clash of cultures . . . and that's great

wbc-adam-jones-032417x.jpg

Jones-Molina WBC spat is a clash of cultures . . . and that's great

The Adam Jones-Yadier Molina verbal skirmish is as predictable as it is annoying.

Was every cultural nuance for the 16 World Baseball Classic teams explained in a booklet the players had to memorize before the tournament?

No? Then it’s amazing there weren’t more moments like this.

Jones, the Orioles outfielder, said Team USA's championship game win over Puerto Rico was motivated by Puerto Rico's choice to plan a post-tournament parade for the team before the final game.

As Jones and his teammates know, parades in pro sports are for championship teams. Red Sox fans are likely aware of this.

As Jones and his teammates know, discussing a parade before a title is secured suggests overconfidence. Rex Ryan fans are likely aware of this.

After an 8-0 win for the U.S., Jones revealed the parade was used as bulletin-board material.

"Before the game, we got a note that there was some championship shirts made -- we didn't make 'em -- and a flight [arranged],” Jones said. “That didn't sit well with us. And a parade -- it didn't sit well with us."

But apparently, Jones didn't know the full context of the parade. It was reportedly planned regardless of whether Puerto Rico won.

One Team USA teammate of Jones whom CSNNE spoke with didn't believe that, however.

"It was called a champions parade that got turned into a celebration parade once they lost," the player said. "I think they just don't like getting called out by Jones, but all Jones did was tell exactly what happened."

Jones’ comments weren’t received well.

Puerto Rico's going through a trying time, a recession, and the entire island rallied behind the team.

“Adam Jones . . . is talking about things he doesn't know about," Molina told ESPN’s Marly Rivera. "He really has to get informed because he shouldn't have said those comments, let alone in public and mocking the way [preparations] were made.”

No one should be upset Jones explained what he was thinking.

Jones actually asked MLB Network host Greg Amsinger, “Should I tell the truth?”

Yes. It’s better than lying.

Look at the reactions across the WBC: the bat flips, the raw emotion. Honesty conveyed via body language.

People in the U.S. are starting to accept and crave those reactions. The WBC helped promote a basic idea: let people be themselves.

Jones said what was on his mind. We can’t celebrate bat flips and then say Jones should keep his mouth shut.

But there's an unreasonable expectation being placed on Jones here.

He heard about a parade -- which is to say, a subject he wouldn't normally think twice about or investigate before a championship baseball game.

Plus, it gave him motivation.

Why is Jones, or anyone with Team USA, more responsible for gaining an advance understanding of Puerto Rico’s parade-planning conventions -- we're talking about parade planning! -- than Puerto Rico is responsible for keeping U.S. norms in mind when making and/or talking about those plans?

No one involved here was thinking about the other’s perception or expectation. It's impossible to always do so.

But that’s how these moments develop: what’s obvious to one party is outlandish to the other.

Now Molina, Puerto Rico's catcher, wants an apology.

"He has to apologize to the Puerto Rican people," Molina told ESPN. "Obviously, you wanted to win; he didn't know what this means to [our] people."

Jones can clear the air with an apology, but he doesn't owe one. And he definitely doesn't owe one after Molina took it a step further.

"I'm sending a message to [Jones], saying, 'Look at this, right now you're in spring training working out, and we're with our people, with our silver medals,' " Molina said. "You're in spring training and you're working . . . you have no idea how to celebrate your honors, you don't know what it means.”

Team USA had no parade. Manager Jim Leyland made clear how the U.S. was celebrating, by recognizing those serving the country.

The silver lining here is how much attention the WBC has drawn, and how much conversation it can drive. People care, a great sign for the sport -- and its potential to foster better understanding across cultures.

Internationally, the sport is on parade.