The hottest team in baseball is the...

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The hottest team in baseball is the...

From Comcast SportsNetCHICAGO (AP) -- The Tampa Bay Rays are making another run at the playoffs and Evan Longoria is leading the way -- again.The Chicago White Sox are slumping at the worst time.Longoria hit a tiebreaking homer in the ninth inning and Tampa Bay gained ground in the wild-card race with its eighth consecutive victory, handing the White Sox a 3-2 loss on Thursday night that damages Chicago's playoff hopes."The belief has never gone away. We've felt like we had a good chance to be a playoff team from the beginning of the year," Longoria said. "The pressure is not on us playing from behind. It's not ours to lose, it's ours to win. We're behind, but we're close enough."The Rays pulled within two games of Oakland for the second AL wild card, while the White Sox fell two games behind Detroit in the AL Central after their eighth loss in nine games. Tampa Bay and Chicago have six games to go, including three more against each other.The Athletics lost 9-7 to Texas and the Tigers beat Kansas City 5-4 earlier Thursday.The White Sox struggled to hit with runners on base, a recurring theme during their recent slide. They are hitting .123 with runners in scoring position over their last 10 games.They twice had the bases loaded and no outs Thursday night but managed just two runs. And then they failed to get down a bunt and made a major baserunning gaffe when they had the potential go-ahead run on base in the eighth."There ain't nobody to blame. I think everybody in here will take accountability for the way we've played," Chicago starter Jake Peavy said."We had it right there in front of us a lot tonight and throughout the last week and a half, just hadn't been able to capitalize on either side of the ball. We've tried to pitch well enough to give us a chance and just hadn't been able to do that quite enough and obviously offensively it's been frustrating here for the last little bit."Longoria's 14th homer came on the eve of the anniversary of his dramatic shot that beat the Yankees on the final day last season and gave the Rays the AL wild card. Now they're hoping for a repeat performance."It's one game. I hate to bring down the mood, but it doesn't put us ahead," Longoria said."It brings us a little bit closer, but it doesn't guarantee anything. It's a good moment for us, good moment for me, but bottom line is it's just one game."Joel Peralta (2-6) pitched an inning for the win and Fernando Rodney finished for his club-record 46th save in 48 chances. After giving up a two-out single to Kevin Youkilis, Rodney struck out Adam Dunn on a 3-2 pitch to end the game."We have to get back to our DNA, which we're starting to do," said Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon, who earned his 600th career win, including a 19-10 interim stint with the Angels in 1999. "Great pitching, not just good defense -- great defense. We have to be great on defense. The fortuitous hit, the clutch hit has to show up for us to get back there."Brett Myers (3-4) gave up Longoria's homer while pitching 1 2-3 innings. The right-hander has allowed a run in each of his last two outings after a run of six consecutive scoreless appearances.The White Sox wasted a handful of opportunities to grab control of the game.A.J. Pierzynski led off the eighth with a single. Pinch-hitter Dewayne Wise then struck out after failing out to get down a bunt and pinch-runner Jordan Danks was ruled out on a double play on Alexei Ramirez's fly ball when he failed to retouch second base on his way back to first. Chicago left 10 on base."We didn't do the little things. Tonight we had an opportunity to get a guy in scoring position and didn't do it," Chicago manager Robin Ventura said."Over the course of the last week or so, we're not doing small things to win games. We have bases loaded, we only get one. Over the course of time that just builds up and it's difficult on your pitching staff to do that over and over again."Paul Konerko hit into a double play with the bases loaded in the fifth, tying it at 2.Luke Scott started the fifth with a drive off Jake Peavy for his 14th homer, giving Tampa Bay a 2-1 lead.Carlos Pena had a sacrifice fly for the Rays in the fourth, but the White Sox tied it in the bottom half when James Shields walked two and gave up a single to Alex Rios to load the bases with no outs. One out later, Shields hit Dayan Viciedo with a pitch to force in a run, then retired the next two batters to avert the big inning.Shields gave up six hits in 6 1-3 innings, throwing 117 pitches. He struck out six and walked four.Peavy went 7 1-3 innings, leaving after walking pinch-hitter Sam Fuld. He gave up four hits, struck out six and walked one.NOTES:The White Sox still have not named a starter for Sunday's series finale to oppose Rays ace David Price. Jeremy Hellickson (9-10) goes for Tampa Bay on Friday against Gavin Floyd (10-11) and Saturday it's Matt Moore (10-11) vs. Chicago's Chris Sale (17- 7). ... Rays C Jose Molina (right quad strain) missed a second straight game. Maddon said "he's doing better," but isn't sure when Molina will be able to return to action. ... Dan Johnson, who homered for Tampa Bay to tie the game with the Yankees on the final day last year, is now a reserve with the White Sox and lined out in the ninth Thursday night. "It's very strange that Danny's over there," Maddon said. "Great guy. He's a big part of Devil RayRay history. ... I know how calm he is in big moments."

Knicks' Noah suspended 20 games by NBA for drug policy violation

Knicks' Noah suspended 20 games by NBA for drug policy violation

NEW YORK - Joakim Noah of the New York Knicks has been suspended 20 games without pay for violating the league’s anti-drug policy.

The NBA announced the suspension Saturday, saying Noah tested positive for Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator LGD-4033 – something that can be found in over-the-counter supplements.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports first reported the suspension.

Noah has not played since Feb. 4 and was likely to miss the Knicks’ final 10 games this season because of a knee injury. The NBA said Noah’s suspension will begin with the ”first NBA regular season or playoff game for which he is eligible and physically able to play.”

Noah is in the first year of a four-year, $72 million contract. He and the Knicks (27-45) have been a disappointment this season. He averaged 5.0 points and 8.7 rebounds in 46 games this season, and has been limited to 75 games over the past two seasons.

Haggerty: Legacies on the line at edge of another Bruins collapse

Haggerty: Legacies on the line at edge of another Bruins collapse

BRIGHTON, Mass – Let’s start with the straight fact that it’s asinine, apologist drivel to let the Bruins off the hook, and perpetuate an off-the-mark myth there isn’t enough talent on the B's roster to be a playoff hockey team.

They are middle-of-the-road in the talent department to be sure, and the roster depth clearly isn’t what it was in their elite years, as the Bruins balance an aging core group with an influx of youthful talent from the next generation. But this is also a proud, talented group with one of the best all-around centers in the NHL in Patrice Bergeron, a former Norris Trophy winner and future Hall of Fame defenseman in Zdeno Chara, a legitimate Hart Trophy candidate and in-his-prime All-Star left winger in Brad Marchand, an emerging 20-year-old offensive superstar in David Pastrnak and a former Vezina Trophy winning goaltender still in his prime in Tuukka Rask.

That doesn’t even mention high-end players David Krejci, David Backes and Torey Krug that are game-changing talents in their own right.

Combine that with the other players on the Bruins roster and this is a team interspersed with proud Stanley Cup winning players and enough talent to still take care of business in the final eight games and punch their playoff ticket. Winning a Cup in 2011 can never be taken away from Chara, Krejci, Bergeron, Marchand, Rask and Adam McQuaid, and neither can the seven straight seasons in the playoffs under Claude Julien.

But there’s a danger now of some late-in-the-game tarnish on Black and Gold legacies for some of those distinguished, proud players if they once again collapse down the stretch this season and miss the playoffs for the third year in a row with a late-season nosedive. Four consecutive regulation losses have cast doubt into everything for the Bruins and roused all the same old uncomfortable questions from the past three years.

Bergeron and Marchand need to find their best games and dominate the way elite players do in big-game situations like Saturday night vs. the Isles. Pastrnak, Brandon Carlo and Frank Vatrano need to show they're ready for the playoffs.Rask needs to finally show he's ready to shine as a No. 1 goalie and lead his team to victory in a big game rather than buckle under weighty pressure. 

“This is their legacy, those guys. They are Stanley Cup champions and they missed last year. Each year we talk about writing our own story, and I believe that because guys come and go,” said coach Bruce Cassidy. “But generally there is a core group of guys and it’s their legacy. I’m sure they want to reach the playoffs and get back to being a Stanley Cup contender every year.

“That’s what they want and to a man I’m sure they would tell you that. I do believe that they believe it’s different [this season]. Until you change the course of your results, those questions are going to come. We have to change the results to make then go away. One week of not getting results that we want doesn’t mean we’re panicking, but we do understand what’s at stake. We want to be playing in April and May.”

If the Bruins can’t pull out a win on Saturday night against the Islanders, who just pushed even with them at 82 points on the season, then their playoff lives will no longer be under their own control anymore. It will become another late-season choke job by a team that will have its character and courage questioned. The highs of six years ago will be matched by the bitter lows of the past three seasons.

People won’t talk about a scrappy, little underdog Bruins team that just couldn’t get over the hump once again. Instead, they’ll lament a formerly proud, tough-minded group of hockey players that somehow turned into NHL tomato cans all too willing to play the victim once the going got tough late in the regular season.

That’s no way to go out if you’ve ever had your name etched on Lord Stanley’s Cup, and the Bruins that know better should be taking that to heart right now.