Hot dog thrown at Tiger Woods

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Hot dog thrown at Tiger Woods

From Comcast SportsNet
SAN MARTIN, Calif. (AP) -- Tiger Woods was sure to make news at CordeValle in his first tournament in seven weeks. Only it wasn't from any of his scores or any of his shots. It was from a hot dog. Even when he returned to golf last year after a sex scandal, Woods heard only the occasional heckle from the crowd or saw a plane toting a saucy message on a banner. But as he stood over a putt on the seventh green toward the end of his final round in the Frys.com Open, he heard a commotion from security and saw remnants of a hot dog being tossed in his direction. "When I looked up, the hot dog was already in the air," Woods said. "The bun was kind of disintegrating." Woods hadn't played on the PGA Tour since the middle of August, when he missed the cut at the PGA Championship amid growing questions about whether he could get his game back to where it once was, or even come close to that standard. His golf looked much improved. After playing only six rounds since the Masters while letting injuries to his left leg fully heal, he overcame a sloppy opening 73 with three straight 68s -- the first time he has had three rounds in a row in the 60s in more than a year on the PGA Tour. That amounted to progress, just not up the leaderboard. Woods wound up 10 shots behind in a tie for 30th in what will be his final PGA Tour event of the year. Still to come is the Australian Open on Nov. 10-13, followed by the Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne. The winner was Bryce Molder, an All-American all four years at Georgia Tech who joined the tour in 2002 and had to wait nearly a decade -- this was his 132nd tournament -- to win. It wasn't easy. Molder holed a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th that got him into a playoff with Briny Baird. Molder outlasted Baird on the sixth extra hole, the longest playoff on tour this year, by making a 6-foot birdie putt. It was a big disappointment for Baird, 0 for 348 on the PGA Tour. He went over 12 million in career earnings, the most by any player who has never won. Even so, Woods managed to produce the most bizarre moment in what already is a strange year. He stood over an 18-foot birdie putt late in his round when a 31-year-old man, whose name wasn't released, yelled out his name and tossed the hot dog in his direction. Woods backed off his birdie putt, then quickly resumed play. He missed the putt. "Some guy just came running on the green, and he had a hot dog, and evidently ... I don't know how he tried to throw it, but I was kind of focusing on my putt when he started yelling," said Woods, who didn't seem bothered by it. "Next thing I know, he laid on the ground, and looked like he wanted to be arrested because he ... put his hands behind his back and turned his head." Sgt. Jose Cardoza said the man was arrested for disturbing the peace and removed from the property. Because it was a misdemeanor, Cardoza said the man would not be taken to jail and his name not disclosed. Cardoza said only that he was from Santa Rosa. "He was very cooperative," Cardoza said. "They said, 'Why did you do this?' He just shook his head in guilt or remorse. He didn't give a reason why he did it." Cardoza said the man claimed he wasn't throwing the hot dog at Woods, rather tossing it in the air. He said the man acknowledged having a drink earlier in the day, but that the man was not drunk. Arjun Atwal, who played with Woods, said he was concerned for a moment at the sight of a fan yelling out Woods' name and approaching the green. "They could have shot him," Atwal said. "The cops could have thought it was something else." It was high drama, albeit briefly, an example that Woods attracts attention simply by being at a tournament. The longest playoff of the year. The first win for Molder. There was even 21-year-old Bud Cauley shooting 66 to finish third, which likely will be enough for him to become only the sixth player to get a PGA Tour card without going to Q-school. And a hot dog steals the show. "It was bizarre," said Rod Pampling, who also played with Woods. "This guy comes running out with a hot dog in his hand, and then he lays down and puts his hands behind his back." Woods said he never felt threatened because he was on the back end of the green and the fan never got close to him. He heard the commotion of security behind him, and when he looked up, the hot dog already was in the air. "I guess he wanted to be in the news," Woods said. "And I'm sure he will be." When he finished with a final birdie, any seriousness of the incident gave way to levity. Dan Diggins, head of security for tournament sponsor Frys Electronics, said the man would be arrested for "everything" and described him as "just an idiot." "It wasn't a chili dog," Diggins said. "That could have been really bad." The rest of Woods' round wasn't nearly as eventful. He did get on the leaderboard, before the leaders teed off, with four birdies in his opening six holes. But he missed the 16th green and made bogey, and after an easy birdie on the 17th, didn't make another one until his final hole on the par-5 ninth. He attributed that to not enough play. Because of injuries to his left leg this year that are finally healed, Woods now has played only 10 full rounds since the Masters. "I haven't played much," Woods said. "That comes with competitive flow, understanding the situations and feels, and game time is a little bit different." He is hosting a tournament at Pebble Beach next week to raise money for his foundation, and he said "family obligations" would keep him from playing the season-ending tournament at Disney.

Smart: 'We can’t just depend on Isaiah to save us'

Smart: 'We can’t just depend on Isaiah to save us'

TORONTO – Marcus Smart and the Boston Celtics aren’t all that different than most Celtics fans.

When the fourth quarter rolls around, they too take a glance at their watches and think … it’s Isaiah Thomas Time.

He was on the floor in the decisive fourth quarter for the Celtics, but you would not have known it by his inability to do what he has done for so much of this season which is dominate play.

And with Thomas unable to take over in the fourth like he’s accustomed to doing, the end result was an all-too-predictable night of late-game struggles as the Toronto Raptors pulled away for a 107-97 win.

Thomas still led the Celtics with 20 points, although only four – that’s almost seven below his league-leading average - came in the fourth quarter.

“Every time I came off a pick, they had two or three guys on me,” Thomas said. “Their point of emphasis was probably to stop me in the fourth quarter and they did a good job of that. They played harder than us in the second half.”

Boston led by as many as 17 points in the first half with solid contributions coming from several players.

But more important, they held their own on the boards while not allowing Toronto many second or third-shot opportunities.

That all changed in the second half.

Toronto became more aggressive defensively, taking away the air space of seemingly every Celtics shooter.

And offensively, DeRozan got hot and when the Celtics took away his drives, he found teammates open for shots that were relatively wide open looks due to them collapsing to help out on DeRozan who led all players with 43 points on 15-for-28 shooting.

Smart had 19 points off the bench on 6-for-15 shooting. Jae Crowder also had 19 points on 6-for-12 shooting for Boston (37-21). And then there was Celtics rookie Jaylen Brown chipping in with 13 points.

Despite their numbers, there was sense that Thomas was getting very little help offensively.

And when you combine that with the team’s overall struggles to play solid defense and rebound the ball, it put the Celtics in a predicament where the clearest path towards victory would once again be Thomas coming through in the fourth quarter.

For those watching the game on CSN, it was an ideal time for Thomas to do what we’ve seen him do time and time again.

But there was a problem.

Apparently too many of his teammates did their share of Thomas-watching down the stretch as well.

“We can’t just depend on Isaiah to save us,” Smart said. “He needs help; other guys need to step up and relieve Isaiah. When he does get that shot, he’s open. They have to watch out for us. We can’t just put it all on Isaiah’s shoulders. Sometimes we get caught doing that instead of helping Isaiah.”

Stars, studs and duds: Things get a bit heated between Celtics and Raptors

Stars, studs and duds: Things get a bit heated between Celtics and Raptors

TORONTO – While no one would go so far as to say that the Boston Celtics and the Toronto Raptors have a full-fledged rivalry, things got a bit testy on Friday.

No play better exemplified this than the Isaiah Thomas drive to the basket in the second quarter that was initially ruled a foul by DeMarre Carroll only to be upgraded to a flagrant-one penalty.

And then less than a minute later, Thomas was called for a flagrant-one penalty when he made contact with DeMar DeRozan.

Thomas was clearly upset with the Celtics losing 107-97, a defeat that included a slew of plays that bothered Thomas but none more than the flagrant foul committed by Carroll.

“It was intentional, did you see it?” Thomas said when asked about it afterwards. “That’s not a basketball play by any means. Guys who aren’t factors in games do that; it is what it is. That was not a basketball play whatsoever.”

That play added to what had been a night of struggles for Thomas who finished with 20 points which barely kept his streak of games with 20 or more points alive which now stands at a franchise-record 42 games.

“We gave this game away. We had it,” Thomas said.

Here are the Stars, Studs and Duds from Friday night’s game.

 

STARS

DeMar DeRozan

He was an All-Star starter this season, and played like one on a night when he needed to carry and even heavier scoring load than usual with Kyle Lowry (right wrist) a last-minute scratch from the starting lineup. DeRozan led all scorers with 43 points, doing so on an efficient 15-for-28 shooting in addition to dishing out five assists and grabbing five rebounds.

 

STUDS

P.J. Tucker

The numbers don’t begin to speak to the impact that Tucker made on this game. His defense, switching and physical play were all factors that contributed heavily to the win. In his first game as a Raptor, he had a near double-double of nine points and 10 rebounds.

Jaylen Brown

You look around and he was the only rookie for either team to get on the floor, let alone make an impact. Brown did a lot of good things for the Celtics, scoring 13 points on 5-for-8 shooting.

Serge Ibaka

Well it looks like the Raptors got the O-K-C Ibaka and not the one who struggled mightily in Orlando. He had 15 points in his Raptors debut on 7-for-12 shooting while grabbing seven rebounds.

Jae Crowder

After being in a shooting funk for most of this month, Crowder delivered a strong performance on Friday with 19 points on 6-for-12 shooting which included 4-for-9 on 3’s.

 

DUDS

Celtics’ second-half defense

This was not one of Boston’s finer moments, as the Raptors turned up the intensity at both ends of the floor and the Celtics never were able to match it. Toronto shot 52.4 percent in the second half, outscored Boston 26-12 on points in the paint and held a 12-5 advantage in second-chance points while keeping the Celtics scoreless in the second half in fast-break points.