...but he does not like 'weird' Olympic rules

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...but he does not like 'weird' Olympic rules

From Comcast SportsNet
LONDON (AP) -- Being the fastest man on Earth doesn't get you through security any quicker at the Olympics. There's no cutting the line for Usain Bolt or getting London's rigid regulations relaxed. And the Olympic champion's not happy about it. Especially when the security guards hold him up ahead of his showpiece 100-meter event. "I was in the line, we were waiting to run and the guy was telling me to line up straight," Bolt said early Monday. "I was like, 'Really? We're about to run and they are going to make me stand in a straight line?' There are just some weird rules here." Such as not being allowed to get skipping ropes past security. "They said I can't bring it in, and I asked, 'Why?'" Bolt recalled. "They just said, 'It is the rules.' So if I have a rubber band that I need to stretch, I can't take it in. And when I asked why, they say, 'It's just the rules.' "It's just some weird small rules that don't make any sense to me, personally." Security has been the only major problem area for games organizers. Thousands of soldiers, sailors and air force personnel had to be drafted to plug the gaps left by the failure by private security contractor G4S to supply all the guards it had promised. Since the games began, it is mainly G4S guards manning entry and exit points. "Every venue is different. Wherever it happens to be in the world, there are different protocols in most places," London organizing committee chairman Sebastian Coe said. "That's the nature of it." But there will be an investigation into Bolt's frustrations, which Coe initially tried to claim had been "lost in the translation." "I will look at this," Coe said. "I am presuming the skipping rope was there a warm-up aid, so I will, of course, look at that." Coe pointed out the bureaucracy that baffled Bolt "didn't seem to slow him up too much." The Jamaican defended his 100-meter Olympic title Sunday in a games record 9.63 seconds, just .05 of a second off his world mark, to beat Jamaican training partner Yohan Blake. And Bolt has largely been impressed with the organization in London. "Great Britain is a wonderful place. They've done so well," he said. "I've been watching the cycling and the rowing. They've done so well. It's just a great Olympics, it's just a great place."

Irving takes over in third quarter, Cavs beat Celtics in Game 4, 112-99

Irving takes over in third quarter, Cavs beat Celtics in Game 4, 112-99

CLEVELAND – They had them right where they wanted them.

LeBron James was in foul trouble.

Kyrie Irving had not yet heated up, and the lead hovered above double figures but seemed oh-so-close to creeping upwards of 20 points if the Celtics did a better job of making open shots in the first half.

Those missed shots, combined with a Kyrie Irving takeover in the third quarter, would prove to be part of the narrative for Game 4 – missed opportunities - as the Cavs rallied for a 112-99 Game 4 win.

Cleveland now leads the best-of-seven series 3-1, with a chance to eliminate the Celtics in Boston on Thursday and advance to the NBA Finals where a well-rested Golden State team will be awaiting them.

Irving led all scorers with a playoff career-high 42 points, 21 of which came in the third quarter. Meanwhile, Boston’s Avery Bradley had 19 points while Jae Crowder (18 points), Al Horford (16), and Kelly Olynyk (15) also finished with double figures scoring.

"He put the team on his back," said Tristan Thompson, regarding Irving's play. "He still has another gear."

Boston spent all of the fourth quarter playing from behind, failing to get that necessary made shot or defensive turnover or stop that they needed to slow down Cleveland’s growing momentum.

And with Irving making a slew of clutch baskets that put Cleveland in control, it was James’ turn to put the game away.

He did just that, finishing with 34 points which included 15 in the fourth quarter.

But for a good chunk of Tuesday’s Game 4 matchup, it looked as though the Celtics were coming back to Boston for Game 5 with the series tied up.

It was an odd game for sure, with nothing being any stranger than LeBron James being whistled for not one, not two, not three, but four personal fouls … in the first half.

The fourth came when he was whistled for an offensive foul against Terry Rozier with 6:46 to play and Boston ahead by 10 points.

With James on the bench, Cleveland managed to play Boston to a standstill as the half ended with the Celtics still leading by 10 points (57-47).

Cleveland slowly crept back in the game in the third, and eventually went ahead 73-72 following a pair of free throws by James with 3:15 to play in the quarter.

The Cavs were able to lead by as many as five points in the third quarter which ended with Cleveland ahead 87-80 as Irving scored the last 14 points for Cleveland which included a buzzer-beating 3-pointer that would be the final points scored in the quarter.

Cleveland’s strong finish to the third was a striking contrast to how the game began.

Boston got off to its best start in this series after a 3-pointer by Jae Crowder put the Celtics ahead 18-11.

The Celtics went ahead 22-13 after a pair of free throws by Jonas Jerebko and would eventually lead by as many as 16 points.

Meanwhile, James – the man Crowder was defending most of the time early on – had six points in the first quarter on 3-for-7 shooting.

Bogaerts has three hits, three RBIs as Red Sox beat Rangers, 11-6

Bogaerts has three hits, three RBIs as Red Sox beat Rangers, 11-6

BOSTON - Xander Bogaerts had three hits and three RBIs, Dustin Pedroia had a two-run double during a four-run seventh inning and the Boston Red Sox beat the Texas Rangers 11-6 on Tuesday night.

Rick Porcello (3-5) won for just the second time at home despite allowing 11 hits in 6 2/3 innings. The reigning AL Cy Young Award winner struck out four and allowed five runs, four earned.

Joey Gallo got his 14th homer for Texas, and Shin-Soo Choo went 2 for 5 with two RBIs.

Texas entered having won 11 of 12. The 11 runs allowed marked a season high.

Andrew Cashner (1-4) pitched five innings, allowing five runs, six hits and four walks. He also threw a pair of wild pitches, one of them allowing Bogaerts to score from third and put Boston up 2-1 after three.