Hanson ready to bring Slap Shot legacy to Bruins

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Hanson ready to bring Slap Shot legacy to Bruins

NORTH SMITHFIELD, R.I. Christian Hanson said it was a no-brainer to sign with the Bruins this summer.

The son of one of the infamous Hanson Brothers from Slap Shot movie fame donning Black and Gold, and splitting time between the AHL Providence Bruins and the NHL parent club in Boston certainly looks and feels like a marriage made in hockey heaven.

The 6-foot-4, 230-pound Hanson isnt a foil-wearing brawler like his cinematic dad, David -- a role that he still reprises in rinks all over the world. But hes a big-bodied center capable of playing third and fourth line roles.

Hansons game is winning face-offs, screening goaltenders, playing a tangible physical role and providing occasional offense while paying attention to the two-way game. In other words hes the type of player that Claude Julien will take notice of, and hes the exact kind of forward that will be useful should injuries gnaw away at the NHL roster once the regular season begins.

His best season game in 2009-10 when he played 69 games between the Maple Leafs and the Marlies, and finished with 14 goals and 38 points, and theres no reason to think he cant reproduce that in ProvidenceBoston.

Hanson was just glad to be back on the ice this past weekend for the start of P-Bruins camp after wrist surgery put him out of commission last February.

Its good to be back out there and get my feet and hands underneath me," he said. "Getting into the high temp is something you cant really recreate while skating over the summer. I can contribute a bit offensively, but hopefully everybody sees that Im a guy that goes hard on every shift. I wear my heart on my sleeve and Ill do anything to win. Thats what I feel like the Bruins are all about.

Hanson said signing with the Bruins was a natural fit for him after spending the last few years playing against them while racking up 42 NHL games in the Toronto Maple Leafs organization. Hanson wants to fit right in with the organizational philosophy, and his words show he holds a clear understanding of what wearing a Bs sweater is all about.

Theyre an organization that fits my kind of game, said Hanson. You look at their forte and how they play hockey, and theyre a hard-working, honest, blue collar type of team. Thats my game.

It works. They won the Stanley Cup two years ago and theyre contenders every year. You look at the type of players they have: Milan Lucic is the ideal power forward. I think hes the best in the game. They have multiple players that go out there and make you say Holy Cow . . . those guys want to win. Thats what you need to have out there.

As for Bs fans that want to celebrate Hansons family legacy by dressing up as the Hanson Brothers or wearing their trademark eyewear, the center said to bring it on with a wide smile.

He never gets tired of answering questions about his dad, and never stops being proud of him either.

I 100 percent love it, Its one of the greatest things, said Hanson when asked about the Slap Shot legacy. I am so proud of him and what hes done. Right now hes in Vancouver doing a six-games-in-seven-nights tour for charity and theyre playing against local policemen and firefighters for charity.

The movie was made in 1977 and theyve been touring consistently since 1995. Theyve raised tens of millions of dollars over the years. For him to be able to do something he loves while benefiting so many people out there, I couldnt be more proud of him.

So dont forget to put on the foil for the inevitable Hanson Brothers Night that will happen in Providence this season, and watch for the knowing smirk on Christians face while hes playing amidst the Hanson hoopla out on the ice.

Draymond Green tells Paul Pierce he doesn't get a farewell tour; Pierce says Warrior blew a 3-1 lead

Draymond Green tells Paul Pierce he doesn't get a farewell tour; Pierce says Warrior blew a 3-1 lead

Draymond Green isn’t exactly known as being the most respectful competitor, so perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise that he spent the early minutes of last night’s game against the Clippers telling Paul Pierce he isn’t a legend. 

Pierce, who will retire at the end of the season, was not in the game at the time, but Green called to him from the court, telling him nobody would give him a farewell tour. 

“Chasing that farewell tour. They don’t love you like that,” Green said. “You can’t get that farewell tour. They don’t love you like that.” 

Green then said something else that was tough to hear through the broadcast before adding, “You thought you was Kobe?”

After the game, Pierce responded on Twitter, going to the easiest and most obvious insult available. As Chris Rock once said, “If I’m driving, and someone crashes into me with one leg, I’m gonna talk about the leg.”

Gronkowski says he has 'no doubt' he'll be ready for start of next season

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Gronkowski says he has 'no doubt' he'll be ready for start of next season

When it comes to projecting Rob Gronkowski's health, it's been best to steer clear of absolutes. There have been too many injuries, too many surgeries, to predict exactly how he'll feel months in advance. 

Still, in speaking with ESPN's Cari Champion recently, he said he had "no doubt" he'll be ready for Week 1 of the 2017 regular season. 

"Yes, for sure," he replied when asked if he expected to be good to go. 

Gronkowski also fielded a question about his long-term future in the sit-down. Lately it's been his coach Bill Belichick and his quarterback Tom  Brady who receiver all the life-after-football queries, but Gronkowski, 27, was asked how much longer he'd like to play. 

"I’m not really sure," he said. "I mean, I still love playing the game, and as of right now, I want to play as long as I possibly could play. My mindset is to keep on going."

Gronkowski landed on season-ending injured reserve in December after undergoing a procedure on his back -- his third back surgery since 2009. He's had nine reported surgeries -- including procedures on his knee, forearm and ankle -- since his final year at the University of Arizona.