Haggerty: Bettman, Fehr need to skip Hall of Fame ceremonies

790836.jpg

Haggerty: Bettman, Fehr need to skip Hall of Fame ceremonies

Monday night is supposed to be an unfettered celebration ofeverything that is right and good about the NHL.

Pavel Bure, Adam Oates, Mats Sundin and Joe Sakic are allset to be inducted together into the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. It should bean evening of pageantry and wonder with the NHL fraternity of greatnessgathering to give each of these favorite sons a welcoming embrace. Normallyits a notable event amid the NHL regular season when hockey fans turn back theclock to remember some of their favorite players something that allows themto feel like little kids once again.

But instead Gary Bettman and Donald Fehr have sent all thosekids to the corner for a time out with no hint of when the punishmentwill end.

The entire hockey world will cast its lonely eyestoward the Monday night Hockey Hall of Fame induction as a puck oasis in thelockout desert. If things had gone a little differently this year, your humblehockey reporter would have been chatting with Patrice Bergeron about idolizingSakic as a youngster who grew up worshiping the Quebec Nordiques. Instead theBs center is in Switzerland wondering when hell next be able to pull on aBruins sweater as hockey writers in North America churn outunflattering blow-by-blows on the NHL lockout.

Hockey Hall of Fame Day has turned into one of the few feel gooddays in whats become a barren hockey wasteland over the last nine weeks. Itserves as one of the only surviving reminders of why people love the game somuch. So thats why both NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and NHLPA Exec DirectorDonald Fehr need to take a knee and sit out the ceremonies on Monday night.

Im certainly not the first to say it, and I wont be thelast either. But it will stink to high heaven if Bettman and Fehr show up inToronto with their Alfred E. Neuman What, Me Worry? expressions that all iswell.

Symbolically the two high-powered hockey executives shouldopt to instead sit together working to find common ground on player contractrights -- or locking down a make-whole provision that works for both theleague and the players. Its a much better message to those that love the gamethan infuriating images of Bettman and Fehr sipping champagne and munching horsdoeuvres on Yonge Street while the NHL burns to the ground.

If they show up they might as get out the fiddle and startplaying to add a soundtrack to their NHL arson job. Its a privilege to attenda Hall of Fame ceremony honoring the games elite athletes, and its somethingneither Bettman nor Fehr deserve given the state theyve left the game.

Above and beyond the mere perception of choosing an NHLevent over an ongoing negotiation that needs to be settled, both Bettman andFehr should step away rather than become the ill-advised cloud over the event.Whether purposeful or inadvertent, the mere presence of the commissioner andthe NHLPA Grand Poobah at the HHOF induction ceremony would take away deservedattention from the nominees.

Imagine toiling your entire career to achieve a certainpinnacle of greatness rewarded with a night honoring your dedicated body ofwork, and instead every topic of conversation reverted back to the toxic messyour workplace had become after you left.

Who needs that?

Bettman and Fehr are smart, proud men with high intellectand healthy egos, but theres also an underlying level of decency andprofessional decorum common to both individuals. No matter what theirbackground is in hockey, they are now NHL gate-keepers and need to toe thatline with proper respect and deference to Sakic, Sundin, Bure and Oates.

They should know better than to attend a night honoring thegame when neither of them can get it back on track right now. Video images ofBettman handing Bure the 1996 Conn Smythe Trophy were aired at Air CanadaCentre over the weekend at an Old Timers Game, and heavy boos rained down fromthe normally bloodless Toronto crowd. That tells you how ugly it could get if Bettmanbecomes a part of the proceedings. It would be an effective tool to show theleague just how uniformly angry the hockey world is at both theleague and the players union, but it would arrive at the expense of four classyHall of Famers.

That should be a league concern: Theres no place for booingand vitriol hurled toward the NHL commissioner as a message of lockoutdisapproval on a night about the honorees. For one night, the NHL should beable to exhale and take a step away from the lockout stench, and that wontbe possible if Bettman and Fehr bring the stink of stalled negotiations withthem.

Perhaps the best thing Bettman and Fehr could do is hole upin a restaurant around the corner from the Hockey Hall of Fame, and work onbridging their differences while keeping an interested eye on the televisedinductions. It would give both men an idea of what they should be aiming forand more importantly what everybody is missing as more games slip rightthrough their executive fingers.

Blakely: Game 4 loss shows just how much Celtics miss Isaiah

Blakely: Game 4 loss shows just how much Celtics miss Isaiah

CLEVELAND --  Down the stretch in Game 4, the Celtics were desperate for someone, anyone, who could slow down Kyrie Irving.
 
But short of that, Boston could have used an offensive closer, too. You know, someone like Isaiah Thomas.

GAME 4: CAVS 112, CELTICS 99

 

The Celtics have relied on the two-time All-Star to carry much of the offensive burden this season, but he was almost always at his best in the fourth quarter.
 
A right hip injury knocked him out of this series after 1 1/2 games. Still, Boston managed to win Game 3 without him and, for large chunks of Tuesday night, seemed poised to beat the Cavs again on their home floor.
 
But as much as Game 4 was a reminder of just how special a talent Irving is (42 points, 21 in the third quarter when the game’s momentum swung in Cleveland's favor), it also provided a clue to the clueless who thought the Celtics were actually better without Isaiah Thomas.
 
Defensively?
 
Absolutely.
 
It’s no secret that teams go to great lengths to try and use his 5-foot-9 stature against him. And as we have seen, the deeper we get into the postseason the more trouble he and the Celtics seem to encounter from a defensive standpoint.
 
But just as we praise Irving for being such a special talent, Thomas has shown that he, too, has offensive gifts that, throughout this season, have left many fans, media and defenders befuddled as to how “the little fella” keeps coming up with one big play, one big shot after another.
 
But as we have learned, he has been dealing with a sore right hip injury for several weeks. The pain and discomfort eventually became too much to bear and so the Celtics did the right thing and shut him down.
 
Without him, the C's are still a good team that on any given night can knock off anyone, even the defending champs.
 
But as Game 4 reminded us, they need Thomas in order to be their best.
 
When Irving torched Boston’s entire defense with jumpers, ankle-breaking crossovers, Euro-step lay-ups and free throws, the Celtics had no one to turn to who could maybe, just maybe, go back at Irving at the other end of the floor.
 
That's what Thomas does that makes him such a special, unique talent in this league.
 
He can score in a variety of ways, with the best in the NBA.
 
We saw that this past season, when he led all players in the Eastern Conference in scoring with a 28.9 points-per-game average.
 
Boston’s excellent ball movement and high assist numbers are certainly important to the team’s success. But to make a deep and meaningful playoff run, you need one or two guys who can just go get buckets regardless of what the opponent does defensively.
 
That’s not Avery Bradley.
 
That’s not Al Horford.
 
That’s not Kelly Olynyk.
 
You can search, poke and prod this roster all you want, and you'll come up empty when it comes to finding a player like that . . . other than Isaiah Thomas.
 
The fact the Celtics were able to avoid getting swept is a victory of sorts in itself. Boston’s coaching staff, as well as the front office, has repeatedly said that as talented as their team is, they aren’t on the same level of the defending champion Cavaliers.
 
And yet here we are four games into this series and the Celtics are basically a bad half of basketball away from being tied, 2-2.
 
It says a lot about their mental toughness, their ability to handle and navigate past adversity to give themselves a chance to be competitive against any team -- including the Cavs.
 
But their success this season has always been about the collective group, regardless of how many late-game shots Isaiah Thomas knocks down.
 
And while he has his shortcomings defensively, not having him available is going to hurt them in those late-game moments when they need a closer. It’s not a coincidence the Celtics were just 2-4 when he didn’t play during the regular season.
 
So as cool as it was for them to win Game 3 without Thomas, he’s still the straw that stirs the Celtics emotionally, bringing them to levels few think they're capable of reaching.
 
They were able to get by for one night without him, but remember this: It took Marcus Smart having an Isaiah Thomas-like game of 27 points and seven made 3’s, for them to win.
 
No one did anything remotely close to that Tuesday night.
 
They looked like the Isaiah Thomas-less Celtics, which is a look they don’t need this time of year.
 
Because that look is so not about winning.