Fuming French accuse England of dirty tricks

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Fuming French accuse England of dirty tricks

From Comcast SportsNet
LONDON (AP) -- It's a feud that's been simmering for seven years -- or, if you leaf through the history books, since at least the Middle Ages. From the moment in 2005 that London trumped Paris by four votes in the contest to host the 2012 Olympics, France has seethed -- furious that their neighbors and historical adversaries had scored a victory every bit as painful as Napoleon's humbling at the fabled Battle of Waterloo. Now, French anger has burst out into the open. In newspapers, on television debate shows and in scores of posts to social networks, Britain is accused of cheating its way to gold medals in the cycling velodrome and of stretching rules on the rowing course. British crowds have been blasted for failing to show enough support to rival nations' competitors, while organizers have faced scorn for failing to rein in judges deemed too harsh on French athletes. British Prime Minister David Cameron has even defended his country's track cyclists -- who won a formidable haul of 14 medals -- from insinuations that their success must be the result of drugs or illegally modified bicycles. "Of course there is no cheating," an indignant Cameron told France 2 television in an interview Wednesday. "There are the most strict anti-doping tests in these Olympics that there have ever been. There are very strict rules about equipment." French cycling fans were already digesting the shock of Bradley Wiggins becoming the first British rider ever to win the prestigious Tour de France last month. To crown that feat, Wiggins and his teammates then won seven of 10 events in the Olympic velodrome -- once a French stronghold. "It's driving the French mad," Cameron teased Thursday, speaking to BBC radio. "I think they found the Union Jacks on the Champs-Elysees a bit hard to take." First Isabelle Gautheron, director of the French Olympic cycling team, stirred old animosities by suggesting Britain's gold streak may have been aided by subterfuge, hinting at the U.K. team's "magic wheels" and its little discussed work with the McLaren Formula One team on cutting edge technology to produce the quickest bike. "They hide their wheels a lot. The ones for the bikes they race on are put in wheel covers at the finish," Gautheron was quoted as telling the French sports newspaper L'Equipe. Then France's world champion cyclist Gregory Bauge -- beaten to gold in the individual sprint category by Britain's Jason Kenny -- hijacked a post-race news conference, demanding that his rival divulge the U.K.'s secrets. Tempers reached boiling point when Britain's Philip Hindes suggested he had crashed his bike deliberately after a lackluster opening during a team sprint -- causing the race to be restarted. Hindes went unpunished; Britain later took gold. Animosity hasn't been confined only to those on two wheels. French rowing coaches complained bitterly after Zac Purchase and Mark Hunter of Britain were allowed a restart in the lightweight double sculls final. A seat in their boat had snapped off, but the French insisted the incident had happened after 100 meters of the race had passed -- meaning there should have been no leniency. Guy Drut, who claimed the 110-meter hurdles gold in 1976 and serves on an International Olympic Committee commission, has complained that British crowds have cheered loudly only for their home athletes -- refusing to acknowledge the efforts of other nations. A controversial decision that cost French boxer Alexis Vastine a win in his bout with welterweight Taras Shelestyuk of Ukraine also brought a furious online reaction from French fans, who castigated officials and organizers. Complaints about favoritism for British athletes aren't all coming from the French. After his team was beaten in a quarterfinal by Britain, Spain field hockey coach Dani Martin complained that some "countries are being favored" by referees. "This is (like) a district tournament," Indian welterweight boxer Manoj Kumar said, speaking through a translator, after he was defeated in a close contest by Britain's Tom Stalker. "It's not an Olympic tournament. Cheating, cheating, cheating."

NFLPA tells rookies to be like Rob Gronkowski

NFLPA tells rookies to be like Rob Gronkowski

Rob Gronkowski is a model citizen in the NFL. In fact, the NFL Players Association is advising rookies to be more like Gronk, according to The Boston Globe

The New England Patriots tight end has developed a name for himself on and off the football field. With that attention comes branding. And at the NFLPA Rookie Premiere from May 18 to 20, the NFLPA encouraged rookies to develop their own brand -- much like Gronkowski.

“Some people think he’s just this extension of a frat boy, and that it’s sort of accidental,” Ahmad Nassar said, via The Globe. Nassar is the president of NFL Players Inc., the for-profit subsidiary of the NFLPA. “And that’s wrong. It’s not accidental, it’s very purposeful. So the message there is, really good branding is where you don’t even feel it. You think, ‘Oh, that’s just Gronk being Gronk.’ Actually, that’s his brand, but it’s so good and so ingrained and so authentic, you don’t even know it’s a brand or think it.”

Gronkowski's "Summer of Gronk" has indirectly become one of his streams of income. The tight end makes appearances for magazines and sponsors. Because of his earnings from branding and endorsements, he didn't touch his NFL salary during the early years of his career.

Gronk was one of three players who were the topics of discussion during the symposium. Dak Prescott and Odell Beckham were also used as examples of players who have been able to generate additional income from endorsements. Beckham, in particular, has been in the spotlight off the football field. He's appeared on the cover of Madden, and just signed a deal with NIke which is reportedly worth $25 million over five years with upwards of $48 million over eight years. His deal, which is a record for an NFL player, will pay him more than his contract with the Giants.

“A lot of people talk to the players about, ‘You should be careful with your money and you should treat your family this way and you should treat your girlfriend or your wife.’ Which is fine. I think that’s valuable,” Nassar said, via The Globe. “But we don’t often give them a chance to answer the question: How do you see yourself as a brand? Because Gronk, Odell, none of those guys accidentally ended up where they are from a branding and marketing standpoint.”

Morning Skate: Sidney Crosby has been a good ambassador as the face of his NHL generation

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Morning Skate: Sidney Crosby has been a good ambassador as the face of his NHL generation

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while wishing everybody a safe and relaxing Memorial Day weekend. 

*Apparently Nashville Predators head coach Peter Laviolette has yet to try Nashville’s hot chicken despite his time behind the Preds bench. It’s okay, I have yet to try it either in my handful of visits to Music City. 

*Good stuff from PHT writer and FOH (Friend of Haggs) Jason Brough. Apparently it wasn’t so easy to make Wayne Gretzky’s head bleed when it came time for director Doug Liman to cut Swingers together

*Sidney Crosby cares about the history and the issues of the game, and has been a good ambassador as the face of his NHL generation despite the hate that always comes with such responsibility. 

*Puck Daddy examines Crosby’s performance in the playoffs, and the odds of him winning another Conn Smythe Trophy. 

*The Penguins have made it to the Stanley Cup Final without Kris Letang for their playoff run, and that’s an amazing accomplishment. 

*Erik Karlsson said that he will be tending to his injured foot next week, and expects a full recovery for next season after a brilliant run with his Ottawa Senators

*Larry Brooks again rails against the Stanley Cup playoff structure and it’s relation to an “absurd regular season.” Say what you will, but the fact the Penguins are there for a second straight season shoots down some of the absurdity stuff in my mind. The best team from the East is where they should be and they did it without Kris Letang to boot. 

*Chicago Blackhawks prospect Alex Debrincat is confident his abilities will translate to the NHL despite his size after taking home honors as the best player in junior hockey this season. 

*For something completely different: Apparently there’s a hard core comic book geek gripe that “The Flash” is burning through bad guys too quickly. This would make sense if they couldn’t revisit these bad guys at any point, but they absolutely can go back to a big bad like Grodd anytime they want.