Former teammates react to Wakefield's retirement

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Former teammates react to Wakefield's retirement

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- As Tim Wakefield announced his retirement Friday evening at Jet Blue Park after 19 seasons, including the last 17 with the Red Sox, 12 of his former teammates looked on.

Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Clay Buchholz, Daniel Bard, Michael Bowden, Scott Atchison, Rich Hill, Jon Lester, Josh Beckett, John Lackey, Kevin Youkilis, and Adrian Gonzalez, were joined by Derek Lowe, representing the 2004 team, Lowes last season in Boston, when the Sox won the World Series for the first time in 86 years.

He led by example, Lowe said. He was a guy you could look up to, a guy you could talk to.

I think the story was he was just throwing knuckleballs in the outfield and someone said, Hey, were going to release you as an infielder. Why dont you try pitching? Its a special story because a guy thats out of the game. If this situation ever happens to me, I think its something that I would do myself. Instead of going to camp and maybe not being assured of a spot, going out on top.

I was happy to see that he did it the way he wanted to, said Jon Lester. I dont think you can ask for anything more than that.

Lesters locker has been next to Wakefields since Lester broke into the big leagues in 2006.

To be honest with you he was tough, Lester said of his first impressions of Wakefield. Hes probably one of the tougher veterans that we had when I first came up and thats not a bad thing. I think he did a good job of being a tough leader and making sure that he was vocally present. My locker is right next to him from day one. He made sure I stayed in line and did the right things both on and off the field. So Im grateful for that. Im grateful for the fact that I got to be a teammate of his and see him do a lot of great things for this organization both on and off the field. I think off the field is more imp. His charitable work is unbelievable.

Doug Mirabelli, not in attendance, was Wakefields personal catcher during his seven seasons with the Sox. He was rushed back to Boston on May 1, 2006, with a State Police escort from Logan Airport after a trade with the Padres to catch for Wakefield against the Yankees that night, arriving at Fenway Park minutes before game time.

Wakey has been a wonderful teammate and friend, and a great representative of his family and the Red Sox, Mirabelli said in a written statement. When you think about the Red Sox you cant help but think of Wakey. What a tremendous success. Hell now have a chance to look back and see what hes accomplished from his days at Florida Tech to pitching 19 years in the major leagues.

Jason Varitek is facing his own potential retirement after 15 seasons.

There is so much to say about Wake, Varitek said in a statement. He has been a part of so many things and hes meant so much to the game, the organization, the community, and personally as a friend and teammate for 14 years. He is a consummate professional with a one-of-a-kind talent that allowed this team flexibility, dependability, and endurance for 17 years. His competitiveness will be missed but his legacy and friendship will last a lifetime. Its sad to see it end but this will be an exciting new chapter for him in his life.

Wakefield will be remembered for a gut-wrenching moment in Red Sox history giving up a home run to Aaron Boone in the 11th inning of Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS -- but what is often forgotten is that he went 2-1 with a 2.57 ERA in that series. Wakefield will also be long remembered for helping the Sox to their two World Series titles in 2004 and 2007.

I think Wakes career can be embodied by Game 3 against the Yankees in the 2004 ALCS, said former manager Terry Francona in a statement. With the team down, he came to me in the fourth inning and asked what he could do. He pitched more than three innings that game, sacrificing his start the next day for the good of the team. A lot of what he did went under the radar. I wish him congratulations on a wonderful career and hope his second career is as good as his first.

Drellich: MLB could explain umpire rulings more often

Drellich: MLB could explain umpire rulings more often

BOSTON — We know that Red Sox manager John Farrell did something wrong. In the absence of any sort of formal announcement otherwise, we’re left to assume the umpires did everything properly — but there’s room for MLB to make that clearer.

If the NBA can put out Last 2 Minute reports, why can’t MLB provide more regular explanations or reviews of contested calls?

Farrell on Tuesday said he’d like to see more public accountability in the umpiring realm, hours before the manager was to sit out Game No. 77. Farrell was suspended one game for making contact with crew chief Bill Miller on Saturday night as manager and umpire rained spittle on each other over a balk call that went against the Sox.

Well, was it a balk or not? Did Miller do anything wrong as well?

“I don’t know if there was anything levied on the other side,” Farrell said. “I don’t know that.”

But would he like such matters to always be public?

“I think there have been strides made in that way,” Farrell said. “I guess I would. I think everyone in uniform would prefer that to be made public. Whether or not that happens, I don’t know, but that would be a choice I would make.”

The league has a thorough internal review system. But it is just that: internal. Most of the time, any way.

On most every night at Fenway Park, there is someone on hand watching just the umpires and reviewing them.

MLB, to its credit, has announced suspensions for umpires in the past. The league has made public acknowledgments when calls have been made incorrectly. More of that seems viable — even if it’s an announcement to reaffirm that the call was made and handled properly, and here are the reasons why.

“I haven’t received any further determination or review of what transpired,” Farrell said. “My position, my stance, remains steadfast. I still firmly believe that time was called [before the balk call was made]. I wasn’t arguing the balk. I was arguing the timing of it. As I reiterated today to those that I spoke with, I still stand by my side of the argument. Unfortunately, there was contact made.”