Boston Bruins

Ex-Chief Waters considers blowout etiquette

594836.jpg

Ex-Chief Waters considers blowout etiquette

FOXBORO - When the Patriots took possession of the ball for the final time Monday night, they had a 27-3 lead over the Chiefs and there was 6:32 remaining in the game. Best case scenario for everyone? The Patriots wind down the clock and are merely taking knees and shaking hands as the seconds tick away. But it's bad form to roll over and Chiefs coach Todd Haley did what he had to do, spending his timeouts one by one until he was out of them with 3:39 remaining. During that span - and after - the Patriots ran the ball nine straight times. But facing third-and-goal from the Chiefs' 1 with 1:14 left, the Patriots threw a quick slant to Aaron Hernandez for a touchdown. In the press box and on Twitter there was cluck-clucking and tsk-tsking. Was the throw in bad form?A penalty wiped out the touchdown and the Patriots soon faced fourth-and-goal from the 4 with 1:06 left. They handed off to rookie Shane Vereen, who scored his first NFL touchdown. More clucking. More tsking. Why not kick a field goal? Or take a knee?In the past, Belichick has explained that kicking field goals in the waning moments of blowouts is more insulting than just running plays on fourth down. At least the defense has a chance to turn the offense away without further scoring, he's explained. Haley is forever looking for slights and breaches of the unwritten rules of football. Last season, he got miffed at Josh McDaniels for some infraction. But there was no postgame agitation between Bill Belichick and Haley. They shook hands and off they went. I asked former Chief and current Patriot Brian Waters if, in general, he had a feeling for end-game blowout etiquette. "Oh boy," he answered. "Well, I think everything's based off of what other people do. It's 60 minutes. We're all paid to play 60 minutes so, hey, you know . . . I know where you're going with this, but hey man, it's the game."A lot of times coaches have a different mentality than players do," Waters explained. "As players, we want to make sure nobody gets hurt, but part of that is making sure you're going full speed and not take anything for granted. You got to do your job. When you start going half speed and other people are going full speed that's when you get hurt. If the play's called, you go full blast. And if they get their feelings hurt, sucks to be them."

Haggerty: Spooner deal represents his last chance with Bruins

bruins_ryan_spooner_031715.jpg

Haggerty: Spooner deal represents his last chance with Bruins

The Bruins and Ryan Spooner wisely came to a contract agreement on a one-year, $2.825 million deal just prior to the start of Wednesday’s arbitration hearing. Don Sweeney hasn’t yet taken a B’s player to arbitration during his three years running the Black and Gold, and it could have grown unnecessarily contentious with a player like Spooner if they’d been forced to point out his flaws as a player in the uncomfortable setting of an arbitration hearing.

“It’s a fair deal for both sides in our opinion,” said Spooner’s agent Murray Kuntz to CSN after the one-year contract had been agreed upon. 

Now that Spooner has been signed to the one-year deal, it represents the last chance for the 25-year-old to show some growth as a player if he wants to be a member of the Bruins for much. Spooner has averaged 12 goals and 44 points over the last two seasons as Boston’s third line center, and has amassed 35 PP points while serving as the trigger man on Boston’s power play from the right-side half-wall. 

But he dropped from 49 points two seasons ago to 39 points last year, and didn’t exactly flourish under the more offensive-minded coaching of Bruce Cassidy. 

Spooner is an excellent special teams player and has been one of the key ingredients in Boston finishing with the NHL’s 7th ranked power play in each of the last two seasons. But he tailed off badly late last season after suffering a concussion, and showed so much tentativeness in his overall game that he became a healthy scratch by the end of Boston’s first round playoff series against the Ottawa Senators. Spooner also continues to sit under a 40 percent success rate in the face-off circle, and shows little consistent interest in winning one-on-one battles anywhere along the ice.

The work on the draws is something, in particular, that comes down to hard work and diligence at practice, and should be an area Spooner can become at least average while practicing every day against a face-off maestro like Patrice Bergeron.  

All of this might be easier to overlook if he consistently utilized his excellent skating speed and considerable skill level to create offense during 5-on-5 play, but that hasn’t been the case enough over the last couple of seasons. A one-year deal for $2.85 gives Spooner one last opportunity to show some growth in those areas with the Bruins, and if he doesn’t then it should be fully expected the Bruins will rekindle trade discussions around Spooner. 

His situation is unmistakable: Spooner isn't going to be a top-6 center with the B's because Patrice Bergeron and David Krejci are firmly entrenched at this spots, and Spooner really doesn't have the right skill set to be a fourth line center. So it's third line center or bust for Spooner as the internal competition grows around him. 

Spooner is now 25 years old and should no longer be viewed as a young player that’s still in the development phase. He should be close to a finished NHL product, and may not get demonstrably better in any area of his game if he doesn’t show it this upcoming season. He was one of the main pieces discussed when the Bruins talked trade with the Minnesota Wild prior to them dealing Marco Scandella to Buffalo, and there is clearly trade value for the former second round pick. 

But the Bruins also have a potential third line center replacement in Jakob Forsbacka Karlsson after signing him out of Boston University at the end of last season. Forsbacka Karlsson may need some AHL time to start this season after looking overmatched in his only NHL appearance late last season, but he’s the eventual two-way center replacement for Spooner in the long term. 

Forsbacka Karlsson may not be as fast or as flashy as Spooner, but he projects to be better on draws, better at winning battles and puck possession and better at being more difficult to play against while boasting his own set of offensive skills. 

It’s now up to Spooner to win that training camp competition with Forsbacka Karlsson for his current third line center position, and protect his own spot on the B’s roster by playing like his very job security depends on it. If he doesn’t show that kind of urgency and hop to his game right from the start of training camp, then it’s only a matter of time before he becomes trade fodder at a salary cap number ($2.825 million) that should be easy to move.

It’s no hyperbole to say that Spooner is entering his final chance with the Black and Gold after avoiding arbitration, and it’s wholly up to him to dictate exactly how long it lasts for.   

Report: Thomas won't need hip surgery

boston-celtics-isaiah-thomas-50817.jpg

Report: Thomas won't need hip surgery

Danny Ainge told the Boston Globe Wednesday that Isaiah Thomas will not need surgery on his right hip after being hampered late in the postseason. 

Thomas originally suffered the injury March 15 against the Timberwolves and missed two games before reaggravating it in Game 6 of the second round against the Wizards. He played the first two games of the Eastern Conference finals but was shut down for the final three. 

“Isaiah is making good progress,” Ainge told the Globe. “He’s out on the court; he’s shooting. He’s full-speed ahead on the stationary bike and working in the swimming pool. He’s progressing nicely.”

The Globe’s Adam Himmelsbach wrote that the team waited for swelling to go down before determining whether surgery would be needed, and that “barring any further setbacks,” he will not. 

Thomas is coming off a career year in which he averaged 28.9 points a game. He is entering the final year of his contract.