Did Canucks fans behave this time around?

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Did Canucks fans behave this time around?

From Comcast SportsNetVANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) -- Canucks fans were dejected but mostly peaceful despite another disappointing playoff run.Unlike the chaos that erupted last June when Vancouver lost to the Boston Bruins in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals, the city's downtown streets cleared quickly and there was little sign of trouble last night following the Canucks' 2-1 loss in overtime to the Los Angeles Kings and their early exit from the NHL playoffs.For the second year in a row, the Canucks managed to rack up the most points in the league during the regular season, winning the Presidents Cup, but they lost the first three games to the Kings, including two at home.A win in Los Angeles last week gave fans new hope, and the flames of that hope were fanned when the Canucks scored in the first period Sunday night. But the Kings tied it up in the third, sending the teams into a short and for Vancouver, disappointing, overtime period."Everybody was stunned silence. Nobody can believe that they are out," Rick Yuck of Calgary said, as some passers-by outside Rogers Arena chanted "Next year, next year."Keegan Grant was inside the arena when the Kings scored early in overtime and said other fans just got up from their seats and began to swear under their breath."My heart stopped," he said. "I was so sad. Words can't express my feelings right now."Ben Basran, of West Vancouver, said he was really mad and disappointed with the loss, but the 13-year-old was quick to put the Canucks' defeat into perspective.Basran said he will now cheer on the Ottawa Senators and begin to watch the city's other professional sports teams."You've got to get over it soon," he said. "You can't dwell on the past."Mike "the Piper" MacDonald was outside Rogers Arena, trying to help fans passing by do just that by playing "Amazing Grace.""Well, everybody knows it as a funeral tune, you know, end of an era, end of a life, end of the Canucks' life," MacDonald said of the song. "So that's very appropriate for tonight."Hanging like ghosts in the twilight sky, the pipe's haunting notes greeted the hockey faithful, some of whom smiled, while others cast their eyes down to the cold, gray sidewalks."I usually try to keep it upbeat, but not tonight. You've got to toy with the emotions of the crowd," MacDonald said. "You know, it helps them overcome their sorrows."

Morning Skate: No surprise cheap-shot artists are running wild

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Morning Skate: No surprise cheap-shot artists are running wild

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while hoping everybody on this Memorial Day takes some time to appreciate all of those that made the ultimate sacrifice to protect our freedom. We should also take a moment to say thanks to people like the three heroes in Oregon that stood up to a hateful bigot earlier this week, and in doing so reaffirmed what the majority of people living in the US believe we are all about while trying to live up to that ideal every day.
 
-- A number of NHL legends are shaking their heads at the dirty play that we’re seeing in these playoffs, particularly those plays targeting the superstars that people pay big money to see in the postseason. Why should anybody be shocked by this? The rooting out of enforcers, and fighting, has taken accountability out of the game for the cheap-shot artists and dirty players, and leaves little real deterrant for players looking to take out opponents with dangerous plays. I wrote about this a couple of years ago when the NHL threw the book at Shawn Thornton for going after Brooks Orpik, and in doing so chose to protect somebody trying to hurt opponents (Orpik) and punish somebody trying to protect his teammates (Thornton). It was a sea change for the league, and something players didn’t forget as more and more enforcers were quickly weeded out of the NHL. This is what the rule-makers and legislators wanted, and now it’s what they’re getting just a couple of years later with dangerous stick-work, cheap shots and a general lack of respect for fellow players.
 
-- Here's why the Tampa Bay Lightning would consider trading a player like Jonathan Drouin, and the major impact that could have on the offseason trade market.
 
-- Down Goes Brown has a Stanley Cup Final rooting guide for the other 28 other fan bases now that Nashville and Pittsburgh are in the final series.

-- So which goaltender has the edge in the Stanley Cup Final: Nashville's Pekka Rinne, or Pittsburgh's two-headed monster of Matt Murray and Marc-Andre Fleury?
 
-- Scotty Bowman says winning back-to-back Stanley Cup titles has become monumentally difficult since the advent of the salary cap.
 
-- Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin are pushing each other to be betters, and showing exactly how a team should be led by its superstars in the salary-cap era for the league.
 
-- For something completely different: We can confirm through this report that a lot of hot dogs are eaten in the summertime. So glad we have people to research these kinds of things.
 

Fourth inning: White Sox 3, Red Sox 1

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Fourth inning: White Sox 3, Red Sox 1

CHICAGO -- David Price came out firing Monday in his first major-league outing since last year's playoffs, striking out the first batter he faced while burning just 14 pitches in a 1-2-3 first inning against the White Sox.

The lefty's elbow had him touching 96 mph on the final pitch of the first inning, which produced an easy groundout to shortstop from first baseman Jose Abreu.

More importantly, the command problems that plagued Price in two outings for Triple-A Pawtucket didn't crop up at the outset.

White Sox leadoff man Tim Anderson swung and missed at a 2-and-2 cutter to start the inning, before Melky Cabrera grounded out to first base with Price covering for the second out.

Price was staked to a 1-0 lead before he threw a pitch.

Mookie Betts' leadoff double against Chicago's David Holmberg gave way to a run thanks to some great Betts base running. He took third base on Dustin Pedroia's ground out and then scored on a foul pop up that Abreu, the first baseman, snagged in foul territory with a basket catch — a rare sacrifice fly to the first baseman.

Click here for the game summary.