Curran: Pats may still go wide in draft

707018.jpg

Curran: Pats may still go wide in draft

During a back-and-forth with some Twitter folks on Thursday, there were virtual eyebrows raised when I was asked if I felt the Patriots would go "all defense" in next month's draft and I answered that wide receiver and offensive line were possible need spots as well.

"Ummmm, wide receiver?" one followed asked dubiously.

Well, yeah. Wide receiver. When you look at the 10 guys on the roster at that position, only two are dead-mortal locks to be on the field for a huge chunk of offensive plays in 2012.
They are Wes Welker, who is soon-to-be 31 and carrying the franchise tag, and Brandon Lloyd, who's 30 and entering the first year of a three-year deal.

The others are as follows:

Donte Stallworth, 31, just signed a one-year deal worth 875,000.

Deion Branch, 33 when the seasons starts, just signed a one-year deal.

Chad Ochocinco, 34, two years left on three-year deal, 1 million salary this year.

Julian Edelman, 25, one-year left on four-year deal, 615,000 salary, primarily a returner, utility player.

Matthew Slater, 26, newly-signed three-year deal, 5.4 million deal, primarily a special teams player.

Anthony Gonzalez, 27, just signed a one-year deal worth 716,000

Tiquan Underwood, 25, end-of-roster player trying to make the team.

Britt Davis, 25, practice squad player trying to make the team.

Some believe the emergence of Aaron Hernandez and Rob Gronkowski as potent weapons mitigates the Patriots' need for true wideouts. But when you look at the roster, you see only one "outside" receiver that the Patriots have long-term commitment to. That's Lloyd.

The Patriots need talented, developmental depth at the position and that should come in the draft.

Bill Belichick seemed to indicate as much this week at the owner's meetings when he said, "You always try to have competition at every position. Weve always had about that many receivers going to camp -- 10, 11, somewhere in there -- and well see what the roster limit ends up being this year.

"There are some guys that I'm sure will be at that position that arent even on our team right now, that were not even talking about. Its just a process."

The Patriots' record of drafting and developing wideouts is woeful. Taylor Price, Brandon Tate, Chad Jackson and Bethel Johnson all went belly-up. Branch and David Givens - selected in the second and seventh rounds in 2002 - are the only wide receivers New England drafted and got major production from in the past decade.

Is it the coaching? Is it the system? Is it bad luck? Is it a position the Patriots don't value and believe can be addressed with smart, veteran players who are mid-tier free agents?

It's probably all of the above to some degree.

But the glut of talented wide receivers in the 2012 draft means that New England will have plenty of chances to target a player they like in the first 100 picks or so.

Just using one draft analysts forecast, there are 12 players who project as being draftable in the third round or before.

At the tail end of the first round and into the second, the Patriots could target a project player like Stephen Hill of Georgia Tech, or a production animal like Mohamed Sanu from Rutgers who doesn't have Hill's speed or measurables but caught 115 balls last season.

As we head into March, we'll look deeper at the wideout class and try to figure which one might make the most sense in New England.

Until then, wideout? Yes. Wideout.

WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

bruins-stars-backes-benn-fight-022617.png

WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

Now THIS is old-time hockey!

There's bad blood between the Bruins' David Backes and the Stars' Jamie Benn that goes back a long way, most recently in last spring's Dallas-St. Louis playoff series when Backes was still with the Blues. They met again today -- and the ungodly (hockey) hour of 11:30 a.m. Dallas time -- for a nationally televised game between Backes' new team, the Bruins, and the Stars.

And it didn't take long for the two to renew acquaintances . . .

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- The Detroit Pistons will retire the jersey number of former UConn star Rip Hamilton tonight, an instrumental figure in the Pistons’ success in the early 2000s that included an NBA title in 2004.
 
Although Hamilton never played for Boston, his impact can be felt within the Celtics locker room.
 
Boston’s Amir Johnson spent his first four NBA seasons as a teammate of Hamilton's in Detroit.
 
In that time, Johnson acknowledges how many of the positive things folks associate with him come from lessons he learned from Hamilton.
 
“He was so relentless when he ran,” Johnson told CSNNE.com. “I remember working out with him one summer. For him to even get his shot off, he sprints full court, goes back down shooting shots, and he just kept doing this over and over and over again, full court sprinting . . . To see that as a young kid, and at his age, just working hard like that, it was great to see.”
 
James Young grew up in nearby Rochester Hills, Mich., so he watched Hamilton’s scoring prowess up close and personal.
 
And as he continued to evolve as a player, Young would see Hamilton during the summer months while attending Hamilton’s basketball camps.
 
“I was there every year, won MVP a few times,” Young told CSNNE.com. “He’s a great guy, a great player.”
 
And, like Hamilton, Young has a lanky frame for an NBA player, which was among the many reasons Young acknowledged Hamilton as being one of his first significant basketball influences as a youth.
 
“For sure,” Young said. “His mid-range game was crazy, great shooter. He was always consistent.”
 
And that consistency has paid off in the highest honor an NBA franchise can bestow upon a player.
 
“That’s big time,” Johnson said. “He’s a champion, great father, great baller. To have his jersey retired is an honor. To see the success he had in the league, and to see his jersey retired with the greats, it's definitely an honor. I’m glad I’ll be there to see that. Kudos to him. He’s a hard worker. Had a great career. I had my high school jersey retired, but to get your NBA jersey retired, that’s great.”
 
Hamilton played 14 seasons in the NBA, nine of which were with the Pistons. A career 17.1 points per game score, he averaged 18.4 with Detroit and was named an Eastern Conference All-Star three times (2006-2008).
 
Although he is known as one of the greatest mid-range shooters of his era, Hamilton began to expand his range over time. During the 2005-06 season, Hamilton shot 45.8 percent from 3-point range (most of them being corner 3’s), which led the NBA that season.