Crawford: I thought I'd be fine by now

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Crawford: I thought I'd be fine by now

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Carl Crawford was told Monday that he should refrain from baseball activity for the next 5-7 days, a bit of news that he took philosophically as he attempts to rebound from wrist surgery.

"I just took it in stride,'' said Crawford Tuesday morning. "There's not too much I can really do. I have to just go with the flow and do whatever I can. That's pretty much it.

"I'm pretty sure just waiting and making sure it's fine and isn't going to hurt. I'm pretty much worrying about my timing. I wanted to get that part in. But at the end of the day, it's probably best to wait for it to heal correctly. That way, I can be strong and not have to worry about it happening again.''

Crawford had attempted to step up his rehab program with some aggressive swings and some bunting drills last week, only to experience some soreness and inflammation.

"It's something I can't control,'' he said. "I just have to wait until it gets ready and my body feels strong and my hand feels strong. I just have to wait for the soreness to go away.''

Manager Bobby Valentine said Monday that, thanks to the week off from activity, having Crawford in the Opening Day lineup is "probably not realistic.''

But Crawford himself isn't sure how long it will take for him to get ready once he's cleared to resume swinging and throwing.

"That's the question I really don't know,'' he said. "I just have to get out there and see how I'm feeling. Normally, for me, I like to get a lot of ABs, so whatever that number is, I'm going to try to get up to where I'm feeling good and have confidence when I come back.

"I thought it would be fine by now, so I have no clue.''

Crawford blamed his own eagerness for the setback and not the rehab program he was following.

"I don't think it was the program,'' he said. "I think it was me pushing myself, just to see. Stuff like this happens. You can't predict this kind of stuff. It's just a setback and you just have to do what you need to do and keep moving forward.

"I think I was just focused on trying to get back period. Opening Day was a goal, but I wanted to be ready for spring training games so I can get the reps. I just wanted to get back on the field in general.''

Celtics-Hawks preview: Thomas 'not worried about' Schroeder

Celtics-Hawks preview: Thomas 'not worried about' Schroeder

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. –  Isaiah Thomas has respect for the Atlanta Hawks team.

So when I asked him about the Hawks, Thomas spoke glowingly about Paul Millsap as being a “special player” and Dwight Howard having a huge impact on shot attempts whether he’s blocking them or not.

But he knows all eyes will be on him and Hawks point guard Dennis Schroeder who had some not-so-nice things to say about Thomas following Boston’s 103-101 win at Atlanta on Jan. 13.

The two waged a feisty, highly combative game most of the Jan. 13 game with Thomas getting the better of Schroeder in just about every statistical category such as scoring (28 points for Thomas compared to 4 for Schroeder), assists (nine to three), and minutes played (36:16 to 22:36).

And then there was the one statistic that mattered most … the win.

But after the game, Schroeder told reporters that Thomas had spoken badly about his mother.

“I’m playing basketball,” Schroder told reporters after the game in January. “If he think that he got to curse at my mom or say some dumb stuff about my family, that has nothing to do with basketball. That’s his choice. I’ve got too much class for that. Next one, we are going to get it.”

The news got back to Thomas who emphatically denied he said anything along those lines.

“I don’t talk about nobody’s mom,” Thomas said when he became aware of Schroeder’s comments. “I don’t cuss at anybody’s mom and I don’t talk about people’s family. So whatever he said, that’s a 100 percent lie and he knows that.”

When I asked Thomas about Schroeder following Boston’s 104-98 win at Detroit Sunday night, he had little to say about the Hawks point guard.

“Man I’m past that. I’m not worried about that guy,” Thomas said. “Once he did that the last game, where he tried to damage my character, (saying I was) talking about his parents … I’m past that. Hopefully we can beat the Atlanta Hawks. I’m not even worried about him.”

Schroeder may not be on Thomas’ radar as a major concern, but the players he spoke of earlier – Millsap and Howard – are two players who can have a significant impact on whether the Celtics can continue to build off of the good things they did against the Pistons.

And Atlanta (32-26) will come in extremely thirsty for success having lost their last three games – all by 15 or more points - and four of the last five.

Despite the Hawks recent struggles, the Celtics understand that despite their success this season they are in no position to take any team lightly.

“They’re a good team. They play the game the right way,” said Boston’s Jaylen Brown. “They have some really good players, some really good shooters, really good bigs down low. We have to come out and play harder than them, match their intensity, execute, move the ball, share the ball and have fun.”

Shaughnessy: Why I'm not a fan of Celtics not trading at deadline

Shaughnessy: Why I'm not a fan of Celtics not trading at deadline

Dan Shaughnessy joins Sports Sunday and talks with Felger about why he hated the Boston Celtics not making any moves at the deadline.