To choose or defer not a toss-up for Pats

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To choose or defer not a toss-up for Pats

FOXBORO - When the Patriots win the opening coin toss, their penchant is to say to the other team, "You decide first if you want to kick or receive."The reasons for any team deciding to defer have been discussed in pretty good detail since the rule was put in a few years back. The prevailing reason cited is getting the ball first in the second half when the game is compressed and possessions become increasingly crucial. Bill Belichick said Tuesday the decision isn't pre-programmed. "We discuss (the decision) every week," Belichick said. " 'We win the loss, we lose the toss. What we're gonna do with the wind . . . relative to what the conditions are?' "There are certainly practical aspects to the conditions that weigh in, but for the Patriots, the quick-strike potency of their offense also makes having the option to get the ball to start the second half appealing. Tom Brady is so proficient at moving the Patriots' offense in for half-ending scoring chances that it becomes doubly-irritating for a team to allow points to the Pats just before the half and then know New England will have the ball to start the third quarter as well. During the Patriots' November win over the Jets, New York quarterback Mark Sanchez called a timeout with less than two minutes remaining in the half and the Jets in scoring position. The stopped clock forced New York to run more plays and give the Patriots another possession before the half. Rex Ryan called the timeout "the stupidest play in football history" because he knew Brady had the potency to score before the half and that New England would get the ball at the start of the second half. "If you take the ball at the beginning of the game you have a chance to have one more possession in the first half," Belichick explained simply. "Take the ball at the beginning of the second half, you have one more chance to have the ball in the second half. It's not like you're stealing from somebody . . . "But what about the uniqueness of the Patriots' offense and Brady's ability to manage the clock?"Time management at the end of the half is critical in every game, regardless of what you do with the coin toss," Belichick shrugged.In Belichick's mind, it seems to be a minor issue. And not nearly as memorable as one instance in which he said he saw "A coach tell a guy what to call (heads or tails). More important, I've seen them criticize what the call was (after a player lost the toss)."Control. Freak.

Highlights: Devin Booker puts up 70 points but Celtics get the win

Highlights: Devin Booker puts up 70 points but Celtics get the win

Highlights from the TD Garden as Devin Booker had a historic performance where he scored 70 points, but it wasn't enough to get the win over the Celtics.

Thomas on Suns: 'We’re worried about the playoffs; they’re worried about the lottery'

Thomas on Suns: 'We’re worried about the playoffs; they’re worried about the lottery'

BOSTON – Stacking wins on top of wins is the mindset of the Boston Celtics right now, so the players who did speak to the media following Friday’s 130-120 win over Phoenix drove that point home emphatically.

But inside the locker room, it was unusually quiet, the kind of silence you expect following a loss.

Considering how the Celtics’ defense was absolutely thrashed by Devin Booker’s franchise record 70 points, there’s no question at a minimum the Celtics’ pride overall was stung.

And when Suns coach Earl Watson began calling time-outs and having his team commit fouls at the end of the game, there’s no question it rubbed a few Celtics the wrong way.

“I don’t think anybody has ever seen that; continuing to call time-outs, continuing to foul when we are up 15. But I mean, it was obvious what they were trying to do. They were trying to get him (Booker) the most points possible. Hat off to to him (Booker). He played a hell of a game.”

Following the game, Watson defended his late-game decision making.

“Calling time-outs at the end kept the game close,” he said. “It’s basketball; I’m not coming to any arena to be liked. If people don’t like us while we build … so what? Do something about it.”

The Suns (22-51) never came any closer than 10 points, which was the final score margin.

Al Horford acknowledged that there was some aggravation following the game.

“You can be frustrated when somebody is doing that to you,” he said. “It’s not to one guy, it’s to the team so I think we’re probably more aggravated at ourselves, at least personally I feel that way. I probably could have done a little better, maybe done some different things to prevent it. We got to give him credit, 70 points, I don’t care it’s 70, he got 70. It’s impressive.”

But there will be some inside the Celtics locker room and among their fan base, who were bothered by the Suns’ late-game actions which seemed more focused on Booker getting numbers than anything else.

When asked about being disrespected by the Suns’ late-game strategy, Thomas wanted no part of that conversation.

“It is what it is,” Thomas said. “We won the game. We’re worried about the playoffs; they’re worried about the lottery.”

 Boom!