Union rejects CBA without full membership presentation

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Union rejects CBA without full membership presentation

NEW YORK As the NBA Players Association gathered Monday, they considered many options on how to handle the latest proposal from the NBA.

One option at their disposal was to present it to the full membership, an option - much like the NBA's latest proposal - that was shot down.

"We did discuss it," said Derek Fisher, president of the now-dissolved NBPA after the union decided to file a disclaimer of interest against the NBA. "We went through our agenda, where we lay out all the information."

Fisher said the gap that existed between where the union was, and where the NBA was willing to go, "probably was not a gap that was going to be able to get closed by continuing to collective bargain."

He added, "and our executive committee and our player reps are elected to make decisions that on behalf of the general body, (if) it's not a deal that we feel will be passed by the general body or accepted by the general body, we have the ability to make those decisions and that was the decision that was made today."

While there were a number of player representatives who clearly did not like this deal, it by no means was a given that the NBA's latest offer would have been shot down had it been presented to the players.

C's point guard Rajon Rondo, who was at the meeting filling in for Celtics representative Paul Pierce (Rondo is his alternate), understands that there are a number of players who will suffer because of the decision made on Monday.

"It wasn't an easy decision," Rondo said. "But at the end of the day you can't look selfishly when you're making these decisions."

He's right.

Which is why, as this case now enters the vortex of the court system following the union's decision to file a disclaimer of interest, you have to wonder if it all could have been avoided if the union would have allowed the entire body to vote on the latest proposal.

But union leaders insisted the process coming into Monday's meeting was to simply present to the player representatives, what they came back with from negotiations with the NBA.

"We came back pretty empty handed," said Keyon Dooling, vice-president for the now-dissolved NBAPA. "We took the next step. Our main focus was to present the deal objectively so the guys could interpret it for themselves."

However, Dooling knows that there will be players upset at this decision, and who will feel that they were excluded from the process that now leaves them out of work for an indefinite period of time.

"Players in the room want to play and (don't want to) miss money as well," Dooling said. "Our body was represented. We got elected officials in there; you got the executive committee in there. We all represent the body of the guys. The guys trusted us and entrusted us to make those decisions."

And those decisions, coupled with some strong-armed negotiating tactics by the NBA, has left the union few options to pursue in bringing a resolution to the negotiating stalemate that exists between them and the NBA.

Bradley still hurting, will miss Celtics game vs. Trail Blazers

Bradley still hurting, will miss Celtics game vs. Trail Blazers

WALTHAM, Mass. – The right Achilles’ strain that has kept Avery Bradley out of five of the Celtics’ past six games, will continue to keep the 6-foot-2 guard sidelined.
 
Celtics coach Brad Stevens said Bradley will not play Saturday against the Portland Trail Blazers.
 
Stevens added that no additional tests have been taken and the Achilles’ itself is structurally fine.
 
“He’s got a lot of soreness around it, and that’s one of those things you have to be ultra-careful with,” said Stevens, who later added that Bradley would not practice with the team today. “When he [Bradley] came back, he said he felt a lot better, and then he played and the next day he practiced. We didn’t do anything live but he did a lot of cutting and did not feel near as good. That’s why he didn’t play Wednesday.”
 
The absence of Bradley was clearly felt in a 117-106 loss to the New York Knicks on Wednesday, a game in which Knicks guard Derrick Rose – the man Bradley would have likely spent defending most of the game – scored 30 points.
 
This season, all-NBA first team defender is  the Celtics’ No. 2 scorer at 17 points per game along with averaging a team-best 6.9 rebounds.
 
In addition, Bradley is shooting a career-best 40.9 percent from 3-point range, as well as dishing out 2.4 assists per game, which also represents a career-high for the 26-year-old.


 

Celtics rookie Jaylen Brown still undecided on All-Star dunk contest

Celtics rookie Jaylen Brown still undecided on All-Star dunk contest

WALTHAM, Mass. – To dunk or not to dunk with the best in the NBA?
 
That is the question Celtics rookie forward Jaylen Brown is grappling with these days.
 
The 6-foot-7 Brown confirmed that he has been invited to be part of the league’s Slam Dunk competition at All-Star weekend, but hasn’t made up his mind as to whether he will participate.
 
Brown said he’ll likely make a decision about it sometime this weekend.
 
While he certainly understands that is indeed an honor for any player to be asked to participate in All-Star weekend, Brown said his trepidation about being part of the slam dunk competition has a lot to do with its potential impact on his body and how that may affect his ability to recharge over the weekend and get ready to finish out his rookie season strong.
 
If he decided to enter the contest, he would be facing some really stiff competition from last year’s winner Zach LaVine of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Orlando’s Aaron Gordon, whose battle last season put their slam dunk competition among the best ever.
 
Facing tough competition is not something that concerns Brown.
 
“I’m not worried about anybody or anything,” Brown said. “I think I have a lot to offer. Just like your rookie year, your body and everything … it’s a lot. All those dunks, they look cool but it takes a toll on your body for sure. I want to put myself in the best position to help the team.”
 
While his focus has been on the Celtics, Brown acknowledged he has been getting a few tips on the competition from teammate Gerald Green, who is also a former Slam Dunk champion.
 
“[Gerald] Green has been coaching me up, giving me a lot of good ideas I wouldn’t have thought on my own,” Brown said. “If I do decide to do it, it’ll be some stuff [nobody] has seen before.”