Rivers takes coaching to different level with self-ejection

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Rivers takes coaching to different level with self-ejection

THE CELTICS LOCKER ROOM HALFTIME OF TUESDAYS PRESEASON LOSS TO THE NETS.

Doc Rivers: All right, guys. Not a bad half. Love the defense. Love the

(Suddenly, Ty Lue busts into the room wearing a fake mustache and a way-too-tight No. 55 NBA official uniform.)

Rivers: What the hell . . . Bill Kennedy?!

Lue (as Kennedy): Thats right, Rivers! And Ive heard just about enough of your garbage tonight. Youre out of here! Muahahaha!

(Celtics security chief Patrick Lynch escorts Rivers out of the locker room as Kennedy disappears into a cloud of smoke.)

AND . . . SCENE.

Im not sure if thats how it went down, but its a lot more fun to pretend. And either way, Operation Bill Kennedy (as Im calling it) has provided an interesting twist on the Celtics pre-season.

If you missed it, last night against the Nets, Rivers threw a curveball at his coaching staff and ejected himself at halftime. It left assistant Armond Hill in charge, and the rest of the crew scrambling to fill in the holes. At the time, some speculated that Doc just felt like watching the presidential debate, but even if thats the case, the exercise made sense, and serves as just another example of the next-level coaching approach that Rivers is bringing to the Celtics.

Call it one of the luxuries of being the longest-tenured coach in the Eastern Conference, of having a roster with three or four players who could coach the team themselves if it came down to it. Call it whatever you want, but last night was another reminder of why while many teams are forced to use the pre-season as a time to sort out routine and essential aspects of NBA life the Celtics arent one of those teams.

For the Celtics, the pre-season is a time to experiment, to leave no stone unturned, to test the limits of reality and make sure everyone in the organization not just the players is ready for anything, at anytime.

After all, we all know that Rivers has a way with the refs. He might be one of the nicest guys in the world off the court, but the guy can be down right brutal with the officials. Of course, with his increased respect around the league, hes probably able to get away with more than most coaches, but at the same time you know that that increased respect will only result in Rivers further pushing the envelope in terms of what he can get away with and more often than not, exceeding those limits.

Ill always remember a particular game against the 76ers back in December of 2009. Rivers was ejected (by Kennedy, of course), leaving very capable assistant Tom Thibodeau in charge. However, Thibodeau froze, and didnt make a substitution over the final 16 minutes as the Celtics (20-4 at the time) choked away the game against a Sixers team that at the time was one of the worst in the league. Im sure Rivers remembers that game, too.

So while most teams will use these few weeks to learn more about who deserves playing time and what rotations work best, Doc Rivers can and will use it for the little things like making sure the mistakes of a random loss three years ago don't repeat themselves . . . or watching the presidential debate.

Either way, the C's are better off.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Horford believes Celtics give him best chance at 'ultimate goal' of NBA Championship

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Horford believes Celtics give him best chance at 'ultimate goal' of NBA Championship

WALTHAM, Mass. -- Pinpointing the exact moment Al Horford made up his mind to become a Boston Celtics isn’t clear, but the seeds of that decision can be traced back to last year’s playoffs – and no we’re not talking about the playoff series between Boston and Atlanta, either.
 
It was the Hawk’s second-round playoff series back in May against Cleveland, a team that swept them out of the Conference finals in 2015 and did so again last about five months ago.
 
Horford had every intention of returning to Atlanta, but as the free agency period wore on two things became quite clear: Winning an NBA title would have to go through Cleveland and it happening with him in Atlanta was becoming more and more unlikely.
 
In came the Celtics with a pitch that was heavy on present-day and down-the-road potential that wouldn’t require him to do anything other than continue to play the way he has for the past nine seasons.
 
“It (becoming a Celtic) became real for me real late and real quick,” Horford told CSNNE.com on Wednesday.
 
After mulling it over for a couple days, Horford said he was ready to become a Celtic.
 
“This could be a great opportunity even though I’m leaving a lot behind,” Horford said.
 
As you listen to Horford speak, it’s clear that the Celtics mystique played a role in his decision to sign with Boston.

 But as much as the Celtics’ lore and its on-the-rise status helped, there were certain events that Boston had no control over that actually helped their cause.
 
First the Hawks got in on a three-team trade in June with Utah and Indiana which sent Hawks All-Star point guard Jeff Teague to the Pacers while Atlanta received Utah’s first-round pick which was 12th overall and was used by Atlanta to select Baylor’s Taurean Prince. The move allowed Atlanta’s Dennis Schroeder to slide over into the now-vacant starting point guard position.
 
While it may help Atlanta down the road, it did little to move them closer towards knocking off Cleveland anytime soon.
 
And then there was the Hawks coming to terms on a three-year, $70.5 million deal with Dwight Howard early in the free agency period. That deal coupled with Atlanta’s desire to bring Kent Bazemore back, cast serious doubt as to whether Horford would return.
 
Horford, who inked a four-year, $113 million deal with Boston, told CSNNE.com that at the time of Atlanta’s deal with Howard, he was still open to the idea of returning.
 
But if Horford did, he knew figuring out the best way to play him, Howard and Paul Millsap who by the way has a player option that he’s likely to exercise which would make him a free agent next summer, was not going to be easy.

“It was definitely going to be different,” Horford said, then adding, “For me, the Celtics were becoming more and more a realistic option. After talking with my family, we felt this was the best for me.”
 
And while it’s still very early in his tenure as a Celtic, Horford has no regrets or second thoughts about his decision.
 
“As a player you always want to be in the best position you can,” Horford said. “I felt for me being on this team would put me in a position to be able to contend and win an NBA championship. That’s my ultimate goal.”
 
And that alone makes him a good fit with this franchise which from ownership to the front office to the coaching staff and of course the players, are all focused on one thing and that’s bringing home Banner 18.
 
 “Look at the resume. He’s been a winner wherever he’s played,” said Boston’s Amir Johnson. “It’s good to have a guy like that, with his talent and with his winning, playing next to you.”