KG explodes back to greatness


KG explodes back to greatness

By Rich Levine

MIAMI You notice it the most when he goes up for a rebound.

Actually, "goes up" doesn't do the motion any sort of justice. He explodes. He literally jumps as high as he can, like a wannabe-NBA-rookie getting measured for his pre-draft vertical.

Even when he has the most basic rebound in front of him one of those boards where the other nine guys have already released by the time the ball falls off the rim he grabs it with nothing less than reckless abandon. He'll snatch the rock on his way up, slap it so hard that James Naismith's original peach basket can feel it, and then he'll just float in the air for a second. He'll let out a little scream, or violently kick one of his legs out to the side. He'll act without hesitation, or concern for himself and his surroundings.

Kevin Garnett does all this because he can.

If we're being honest, it feels wrong, maybe even a little insulting to write a paragraph (or two) commending one of the greatest power forwards in NBA history on his ability to jump, rebound, or do anything you'd expect out of even the Joel Anthonys of the world. It's like marveling over a 90 MPH Roy Halladay fastball or an LT touchdown run.

But anyone who watched Kevin Garnett over the course of last season which I assume includes anyone who's still reading this story realizes how fortunate they are to once again see him perform at this current level of legitimacy.

To see him run down the floor without looking like he just stubbed his toe. To see him hit the ground and get up without limping, looking down at his knee or screaming, "I'm OK! I'm OK!" like he was trying to convince himself of something that clearly wasn't true. To see him go up for loose rebounds in traffic by jumping off and coming down on both legs, instead favoring his left leg on every landing. To see him not only fight for position on the block, but actually win those fights.

To see him play like Kevin Garnett.

Honestly, did you ever believe you'd see that again?

I didn't. Sure, we knew Garnett would be better this season, a full year removed from his surgery. We expected him to be faster, stronger, more confident, and to brush off at least some of the rust that had built up over the previous 18 months. He showed glimpses of that in last year's playoffs. He looked like he was getting better. But he still had such a long way to go. He still wasn't even a shadow of the guy whod helped raise Banner 17.

It's easy to forget this now, but Garnett literally couldn't catch an alley-oop last year. He missed more lay-ups in 69 games than he had in the previous 16 seasons combined. He was routinely getting punked by the likes of Andray Blatche, Al Harrington and Kris Humphries.

He looked like he lost it. And most of the time in this league, when a guy like KG who started young, and went on to play an ungodly amount of minutes loses it, it's lost. Look what happened to Tracy McGrady. A few years ago he was averaging 25 points a game. Then he suffered a knee injury, and now hes a mop up man for the Pistons. And he's only 31.

KG's 34. You knew his mind would never quit, and that's why you still held out hope that he'd come back better this season. But you had to wonder how much his body had left in the tank.

At least I did. But I'm not wondering anymore.

On Thursday night in Miami, Garnett posted his fifth double-double in only his ninth game of the season. Last year, he had 10 double-doubles in 69 games. He already has three games with three or more steals, after doing that only twice all of last year. His scoring is up, but even more impressive is how he's scoring. Yeah, there's still a lot of jump shots. But he's also running the floor. He's finishing at the rim. He's converting on dunks, alley-oops and put backs which, I know, still only count for two points, but are also so indicative of what he's able to do and how much he's able to trust in that knee.

And even then, it's not really about numbers with KG. It never is. It's about that movement; that agility; that fire and explosiveness. It's about how much space he can cover on defense, how many jump balls he can win off the glass, how much he can effect the ebb and flow of every single game by just being wild and crazy KG.

Last year, that wasn't there. Last year, he would have been eaten up by Chris Bosh. Hell, he wouldve been dominated by Joel Anthony. But last night, he was in control. He was dominating.

Listen, I can't sit here and claim that Garnetts been transported back into the prime of his career. The Garnett we see now isn't as good as the man we saw in 2007, never mind all those legendary seasons before he was here. But while to this point, much of his season at least from a national perspective has been marred by the Charlie Villanueva incident. For those who care more about KG the basketball player, this season has been about one of the game's all-time greats once again returning to greatness.

Maybe he's not the old KG. In reality, he'll never again be the old KG. But at least now hes back to being KG. At least now, for the first time since he limped off the court that February night in Utah, you watch him and never forget that seeing one of the greatest power forwards in NBA history.

And if you haven't seen it yet, just watch the next time he goes up sorry, explodes for one of those rebounds.

I promise you it's there.

Rich Levine's column runs each Monday, Wednesday and Friday on Rich can be reached at Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrlevine33

Young understands work isn't done after claiming Celtics final roster spot

Young understands work isn't done after claiming Celtics final roster spot

WALTHAM, Mass. – For so many years the game of basketball came easy – almost too easy – for James Young.

He stood out on a young Kentucky team that played at the highest levels, delivering the kind of performances as an 18-year-old college freshman that catapulted him into the first round of the NBA draft.

To be so young and already having achieved a childhood dream, to be in the NBA, Young was too young to realize how quickly the dream could become a nightmare if he didn't put in the necessary work.

The past couple of weeks have not been easy for Young, aware that the Celtics were torn as to whether they should keep him around this season or waive him.

They choose the former and instead waived his now-ex teammate R.J. Hunter, on Hunter’s 23rd birthday no less.

One of the first acts Young said he planned to do following Monday's practice was to reach out to Hunter, offer words of encouragement to a player he looked upon as a brother, a brother who is in a state of basketball limbo right now which could have easily been the latest chapter in James Young’s basketball narrative.

And that’s why as happy as Young is to still be donning the Green and White, his work towards proving himself to this team, to this franchise is far from done.

You listen to veterans like Jae Crowder, a second-round pick who has come up the hard way in the NBA, they speak of how Young now takes the game more serious.

Even Young acknowledged that he didn’t take the NBA game and the need to work at staying in the league as serious as he should have initially.

“I wasn’t playing as hard (early on),” Young admitted. “I just was satisfied being where I was, being too comfortable. My confidence was down. I have to change that around.”

Crowder, a straight-no-chaser kind of fellow, said as much when I asked him about the changes he has seen in Young.

“He’s taking stuff a little more serious,” Crowder said. “It’s growing up. He came in as a first-round draft pick and was on the borderline of getting cut. I don’t know what else is going to wake you up.”

That’s part of what made this decision so difficult and on some levels, left players with mixed emotions about the decision.

For those of us who followed this team through training camp, there was no question that Young had the better camp.

But the one thing that was never questioned with Hunter, was his work ethic. He made his share of mistakes and missed more shots than a player with a sharpshooter's reputation should, but you never got a sense it had anything to do with him not working as hard as he needed to.

That was among the more notable issues with Young who came into the league as an 18-year-old. That youth probably worked for him as opposed to Hunter who played three years of college basketball and was expected to be seemingly more NBA-ready.

Even though Hunter’s NBA future is on uncertain ground now, he’s too young and too talented to not get at least one more crack with an NBA team.

And by Boston waiving him, he really does become a low-risk, high-reward prospect that an NBA team might want to take a closer look at with their club. 

And Young remains a Celtic, doing all that he can to climb up the pecking order which now has him as the clear-cut 15th man on the roster.

He might see more minutes than rookie Demetrius Jackson and possibly second-year forward Jordan Mickey, but Young’s future with the Boston Celtics is still on relatively thin ice.

“I told him this morning, this might be the first time he’s earned anything in his life,” said Danny Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations.  “He earned this by his play, day-in and day-out. He was given a lot as a young kid with a lot of promise, a lot of potential. We talked about earlier this summer, he had to come out and win a spot with some good competition and he did. He needs to keep doing what he’s doing.”

More than anything else, Young has been consistent in his effort, overall energy and attention to detail. But it remains to be seen if Young has done all that to just secure a roster spot, or has he truly grown up and figured out what has to be done in order to be an NBA player.

Celtics break ground on new practice facility


Celtics break ground on new practice facility

BRIGHTON, Mass. -- When it comes to finding ways to attract the best talent, colleges and universities often seek to upgrade their training facilities as an enticement to prospective players.
So why should it be any different at the pro level?
The Boston Celtics had a groundbreaking ceremony Monday morning for The Auerbach Center at New Balance Headquarters.
“When you think he was hired in 1966 and they’re still honoring him, it’s very humbling,” said Randy Auerbach, Red’s daughter.
New Balance officials echoed similar sentiments about the legendary Red Auerbach, the architect of arguably the greatest dynasty in professional basketball.
“Red Auerbach was a true entrepreneur whose passion for winning and dedication to the sport of basketball and the Boston Celtics was equally matched with his commitment to people and his local community,” said Jim Davis, Chairman and Owner at New Balance.  “New Balance is extremely proud to join with the Boston Celtics in honoring his professional achievements and personal values through ‘Red’s House’ at our Boston world headquarters.”
Celtics president Rich Gotham cited several benefits to moving the team to a state-of-the-art practice facility closer to Boston.
Among the reasons given was the potential for the practice facility to be a potential enticement for free agents.
“Players spend more time in the practice facility than they do in the arena they play in certainly, and maybe more than they do at home,” Gotham said. “So having a place where they feel comfortable, a place where they want to spend time to improve themselves across the board … it’s all coming together in a pretty big way. The best players know it’s integral to their success that make sure that support is there, that infrastructure is there. So when we’re out talking to a player, we’re going to be talking about this practice facility we’re building. Because we do think it’s an important part of our story.”
Some of the features of the new practice facility will include:
·  Two state-of-the-art parquet floor basketball courts where the team will practice
·  Leading edge audio-visual technology throughout the facility
·  Expanded strength and conditioning, training, and recovery facilities
·  Best-in-class locker rooms and players’ lounge
·  Physical therapy areas including hydrotherapy pools
·  Sports science and nutrition facilities
·  Expanded media work room, press conference and broadcast facilities
·  A flexible hospitality area designed for community relations activities, partner gatherings and other guest events
·  Work space for the team’s coaching and basketball front office staffs
While the facility will have all the bells and whistles you would come to expect in a new facility, Gotham said there will be a balance of sorts struck between that and the franchise’s longstanding history.
“What will be clear is it will be … at that intersection of, which is a strange intersection, of innovation but honoring our tradition,” Gotham said. “This will be a building that’s state-of-the-art, moving forward. But at the same time, I think one of the things we’re lucky to have is this treasure trove of great guys who came before us who left great wisdom and great quotes. You can see a lot of that built in. Coach Stevens is big on having motivational phrases around for the guys to see every single day when they come in for practice. If those come from Red Auerbach and Bill Russell, all the better. You’ll see us incorporating those kind of things.”