Friday FT's: The Pierce and KG effect

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Friday FT's: The Pierce and KG effect

Welcome back to Friday Free Throws, a weekly recap of the most interesting news, notes, and information that have not made the headlines but are still worth a read. In spite of the NBA lockout, there's still plenty of hoops to talk about.

When players join the Boston Celtics, it's not uncommon to hear them express how pleasantly surprised they were to see the other side of Kevin Garnett the one you only get to see if you are on his team. Turns out the same is true if you play for his former squad, at least in the case of the highly anticipated rookie Ricky Rubio. The 21-year-old from Spain recently told the Star Tribune he has been working out in California with Garnett and Paul Pierce, and receiving advice from KG as well. I talk with KG, too, and he talked to me great things about Minnesota, Rubio said. He said the crowd cheers very hard for the team. They love the sport. We have to fight to give them what they are waiting for us to do, to win.
When Is It Cool to Snatch Baron Davis Food?
While Garnett is already playing a role in Rubios career, Baron Davis told ESPNs Land O'Lakers blog about the influence Pierce had on him. The two met growing up in California and Davis contemplated attending the University of Kansas because of Pierce. They formed a bond even after this, well, interesting first encounter:

I want to say I played fifth or sixth graders, and he was playing with like seventh, eighth, and nine. Andre Miller played in the league, too. I'll never forget, it was after the game, we won, and I went and bought a snack.Then this dude just walked up, and he was like "Give me some of that!" I was like, "What?" And it was Paul. He was like, "Hey man, give me some of that food, man." Then he snatched it out of my hand.I was like, "Ummm . . . Okay." I had seen him play the weekend before, and I was like "Alright, dude! I get to hang out with Paul Pierce!" But from that point, we were playing on the same AAU team. I was the young point guard, but Paul was always one of the best players -- he was the best player on the team."

Davis went on to recount how Pierce (seemingly effortlessly) scored 28 points in a game. He remembered, So I was like, 'All right, you can have my food, dog. It's all good. You're Paul Pierce.' "

So theres Michael Finley . . .
Ever wondered what happened to Michael Finley after he left the NBA after 15 years following his 2009-10 stint with the Celtics? Finley is now giving back, establishing an endowed scholarship at his alma mater, the University of Wisconsin. The annual scholarship will be awarded to an African-American student-athlete at the school.

I wanted to give back to the university that was so instrumental to me as a basketball player and as a man, Finley said at a press conference, the Badger Herald reported. This is something that is going to hopefully live a lot longer than myself. Its a way of extending my legacy here at the university and giving another kid the opportunity to fulfill their dreams through the UW.

Finley averaged 5.2 points in 21 games with the Celtics.

Celtics Tweet of the Week
@iambigbaby11: Been losing a lot weight. Can't wait to Show you guys what I've been doing. Ayo baby
Celtics Birthdays of the Week
Hall of Famer Bill Walton turned 59 on November 5. He won a championship with the Celtics in 1986 . . . Fellow Hall of Famer Tom "Satch" Sanders turned 73 on November 8. He captured eight titles with the C's during the 1960s . . . Kendrick Perkins (27) and Troy Bell (31) share a birthday on November 10 -- and close ties. Bell and Perkins were selected in the 2003 NBA Draft by the Celtics and Grizzlies, respectively, and then traded for one another. Like Walton and Sanders celebrating birthdays this week, Perkins also won a title with the Celtics in 2008.
This Week in Celtics History
On November 6, 2000, the Celtics signed Salem, Massachusetts native Rick Brunson as a free agent. He played seven games for the C's during the 2000-01 season . . . On November 8, 1999 the Celtics waived Wayne Turner and signed Doug Overton as a free agent. On that day in 1996, they also signed Nate Driggers and in 1995 signed Larry Sykes.

Celtics make progress, but was it a successful season?

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Celtics make progress, but was it a successful season?

BOSTON -- Success comes in many shapes and sizes, and is not always seen the same by NBA players -- not even teammates.

That was certainly the case following Boston’s 104-92 Game 6 loss to the Atlanta Hawks, which ended the Celtics season.

While the C's won more regular-season games (48) than they did a year ago and put up a much better fight in the playoffs than last April's four-game sweep at the hands of Cleveland, having it all end the way it did at home on Thursday clearly left a bitter taste in the mouths of most players.

Whether this was a successful season is open to debate.

But what’s abundantly clear for the Celtics is this team did indeed make progress from where it was a year ago.

“You go from 40 (wins), under .500 and barely making the playoffs and kind of eeking in at the end by winning six straight, to being in the mix for being a top-four seed in the East,” said Celtics coach Brad Stevens. “And so, yes, there’s progress.”

But as far as this being a successful season, that’s not nearly as cut and dry.

“Of course it’s only going to be one team to have a successful year and that’s when you hold that trophy up,” said  Jae Crowder. “So until we do that, it’s not a successful season. We are going to keep building, keep working.”

Marcus Smart had a slightly different opinion on the matter.

“I don’t look at it as a failure, for sure,” Smart said. “We did a lot of great things this season. We’re a young team. That’s good for us coming back. We have a lot of work to do, obviously, but I don’t look at the season as a failure. So I guess you can say it was a success for us.”

But looking at how this season ended, while disappointing, serves as a reminder as to how Boston remains a team with talent but plenty of room to grow.

“People have told me all along there’s two really tough tasks, right?” Stevens said. “One is getting to be a very good, competitive team at a top 10-15 level on offense and defense and give yourself a chance to be in the discussion we’re in right now. And that’s been a path in the last three years to get there.

"And the next (task, which is becoming a legitimate championship contender) is tough. And that’s been communicated before to me and we’re learning a lot. We learned a lot through this playoff series, but one of the things that I’ve learned is we’ve got to get better. And you know what? That starts with me. I’ve got to get better, and then I think each of our players will look at that accountably as well and we’re all going to be better the next time we take the court.”

In doing so, they look to build off the progress made this season and inch closer towards having a truly successful season . . . which around here more often than not, means competing for an NBA title.

That’s why for Jared Sullinger, one of the few remaining players from the Big Three era of Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen when deep postseason runs were an expectation and not a goal, he doesn’t see this season as being a successful one for the Green team.

“If we’re thinking making it to the playoffs is a successful season, then we’re going in the wrong direction,” Sullinger said. “If you look in this locker room, you see everybody’s down. We didn’t want it to end like that; we wanted to make a run. It’s tough losing like that.”

Sullinger added, “Last year we were glad to make the playoffs. This year, we wanted to make a run, we wanted to make some noise. Unfortunately, our noise got cut short.”