Four things to know about Kendrick Perkins' rehab

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Four things to know about Kendrick Perkins' rehab

By Jessica Camerato
CSNNE.com

For the first time in years, the Boston Celtics have begun their season without their core starting five on the court.

Kendrick Perkins has been on the road to recovery ever since suffering a devastating right knee injury in Game Six of the NBA Finals and undergoing surgery to repair a torn ACL in July.

Perkins aims to play before the All-Star Break. In the meantime, his absence is felt as centers Jermaine and Shaquille O'Neal battle injuries of their own.

It's no secret Perkins is determined to get healthy and help the Celtics. As he fights his way back on to the court, here are four other things to know about his rehab:
DOUBLE DUTY
Being injured doesn't keep Perkins away from the gym. In fact, he makes two trips a day.

"I'm at the gym twice a day," he said. "Three hours for practice, three hours when I come back at night. For practice, I get there at 11 a.m.. At night I get there about 10, leave at 1 in the morning, something like that. We've got 24-hour access, so we've got to get it in."

CAN'T GET ENOUGH
Perkins has made one of the most noticeable physical transformations on the Celtics over the years. After slimming down, he wants to maintain his conditioning while he rehabs.

"I do extra conditioning," he explained. "I don't think I can ever get too much conditioning, so I try to stay in the best shape possible. I work out with one of our strength coaches and we do different things every day -- exercise bike, elliptical, treadmill, stuff like that."
THE HARDEST PART
As grueling as rehab can be at times, it has been easier than Perkins expected. But the team-first big man didn't realize the most difficult part wouldn't be pain in his knee.

"It's been easier as far as physically," he said of the rehabilitation process. "Mentally it's harder, watching guys go at it and play basketball. It's tough watching the team doing what they do. So mentally, it's harder."
FINDING INSPIRATION IN FOXBORO
Perkins wants to do more than simply return to basketball. He looks to come back an even better player than before, and he's drawing inspiration from a fellow New England athlete who also suffered a similar injury.

"I'm just trying to come back better than ever. That's my goal," he said. "You try to come back like a Wes Welker (Patriots wide receiver). You try to come back harder, at least. Wes Welker, that's my motivation. For real."

Jessica Camerato is on Twitter at http:twitter.comjcameratonba

Thomas on not getting All-Star start: 'It hurts but I’ll be all right’

Thomas on not getting All-Star start: 'It hurts but I’ll be all right’

WALTHAM, Mass. –  Isaiah Thomas stood before the media throng on Friday afternoon at the Celtics’ practice facility and answered all the questions with the usual truthful tone sprinkled with a bit of humor.
 
But you could sense that he was still bitter about the results announced by the NBA on Thursday as to who will be the starters in next month’s All-Star Game.
 
Cleveland’s LeBron James, Giannis Antetokounmpo of Milwaukee and Chicago’s Jimmy Butler were the frontcourt starters announced by the league. In the backcourt you will find Cleveland’s Kyrie Irving and Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan, who finished in a tie with Thomas in this first season in which fans, media and players all have a say in who will be the game’s starting five, as opposed to past seasons in which the starters were chosen strictly by fans.
 
DeRozan and Thomas finished in a tie under the voting system, but DeRozan moved ahead of Thomas due to a tie-breaker (fan vote), in which DeRozan had about 41,000 more votes than Thomas.
 
“It’s not the end of the world; it’s all good,” said Thomas. “I was disappointed, but those guys deserve it as well. I did everything I could in my control to put myself in position to be a starter. It’s not the end of the world.”
 
Especially knowing that the coaches will vote him on to the team for the second year in a row.
 
But for Thomas to be even in the conversation speaks to how the league’s new system of choosing All-Star starters, makes the whole choosing of starters about more than just a popularity contest, which is the irony of Thomas being left off the starting five – it ultimately came down to DeRozan receiving more votes from fans than Thomas.
 
“I didn’t really look at it. I didn’t look at what the reason was, but it is what it is,” Thomas said. “I’ll use it as motivation. I have to get better. That’s all I took out of that. I’m not where I want to be.”
 
Thomas finished fourth in fan voting for the starting nod, but was second among players and first among Eastern Conference guards among the media.
 
“I appreciate everybody who voted for me, especially you [media] guys,” Thomas said. “The media showed me some love and then my peers showed me love too.”
 
But as far as coming so close to being an All-Star starter and not making it, Thomas said, “It hurts but I’ll be alright. I’ll use it as motivation and keep going.”
 
Thomas is having a banner season that has elevated his name and game into the conversation for the league’s MVP award that so far is being led by Houston’s James Harden and Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook.
 
He averages 28.7 points per game, which is tops among Eastern Conference players and fourth overall. 

Among his more notable accomplishments this season, he scored a franchise-record 29 points in the fourth quarter of a win over Miami, and in the same game, wound up scoring a career-high 52 points.
 
Thomas isn’t the only NBA player who has had a season that most would believe would result in him being an All-Star starter.
 
“You look in the west, [Oklahoma City guard Russell Westbrook] averages a triple-double and he didn’t get in [to start],” Thomas said. “I guess…I’ll let everybody debate for me and argue for me. Those guys that made it who start, they deserved it.”
 

NBA reaches seven-year labor agreement with players' union

NBA reaches seven-year labor agreement with players' union

When was the last time you saw any labor contract — not just the NBA, not just pro sports, but in any business — get done before either side could opt-out, let alone the actual deadline?

That’s what happened with the NBA’s new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). The teams had until Dec. 15 of last year to opt out, with the real deadline for a new deal being July 1 of this year. Yet the two sides reached a deal before either side even opted out.

Thursday the NBA and National Basketball Players’ Association announced that the new CBA had been signed. It’s a seven-year deal that kicks in July 1.

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