Former Celtics draft pick remembered on 911

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Former Celtics draft pick remembered on 911

By Jessica Camerato
CSNNE.com Follow @JCameratoNBA
Hakeem Olajuwon was the first overall pick in the 1984 NBA Draft. Michael Jordan followed shortly thereafter at third, and Charles Barkley was drafted fifth.

The final selection that year belonged to the Boston Celtics. With the 228th pick, they chose Dan Trant, a native of Ireland who graduated from Westfield High School and Clark University in Massachusetts.

Trant never suited up for the Celtics. He never won an NBA championship or achieved a Hall of Fame career like others in his draft class. But on September 11, Trant will be recognized for another reason -- he was one of thousands killed in the World Trade Center attacks.

The Irish Times commemorated the 10-year anniversary with a feature on Trant's life.

In truth, Trants selection by the Boston side was a gesture to a local talent more than a cold-headed recruitment: Trant was never going to break into a team that had just won the NBA championship.

But still, he spent a summer playing ball with Bird and company which is, I think, more magical than if he had hung around the fringes of the squad for a season. That autumn, he was in Ireland.

In the years after he returned home, the charmed life seemed to continue: he worked his way up in the Cantor Fitzgerald firm as a trader and by August 2000, he was making good money and had moved his wife Kathy and young family to Long Island. He spent the evening of September 10th with his sons at a Red Sox-Yankees baseball game and life was glorious.

So Dan Trants name will be among the thousands of names called aloud at tomorrows 10th anniversary service in New York. His is just one life, one story among the thousands of rich lives that met such sorrowful ends.

Trant and other victims were honored on Friday at the Western Mass 911 Tribute Golf Tournament in Southwick. Former Celtics Dave Cowens, Tom "Satch" Sanders, M.L. Carr, and Greg Kite were in attendance.

"There is no question about this occasion," Sanders told MassLive.com. "It is about men and women who lost their lives. They will not be forgotten.

Jessica Camerato is on Twitter at http:twitter.comJCameratoNBA

Bradley (Achilles) 'felt good' during return to Celtics lineup

Bradley (Achilles) 'felt good' during return to Celtics lineup

WALTHAM, Mass. – As the final horn blew in Boston’s 108-98 win over Charlotte on Monday night, the game was a win-win kind of night for Avery Bradley.

The Celtics (26-15) continue rolling over opponents at the TD Garden, and he played a relatively pain-free 33 minutes in the win.

It was Bradley’s first game back after missing the previous four with a strained right Achilles injury.

And the fact that he was back on the practice floor on Tuesday (be it a light practice, mind you), bodes well for his injury being a thing of the past now.

“I felt good. It wasn’t sore at all in the game,” Bradley said. “I felt I was moving good. After the game I was a little sore and this morning, but otherwise I felt good.”

Despite Boston being 4-1 this season when Bradley doesn’t play, he has immense value to this Celtics team at both ends of the floor.

Offensively he has been Boston’s second-leading scorer most of this season and currently averages a career-high 17.7 points per game along with 6.9 rebounds which is also a career high.

And defensively, Bradley is coming off a season in which he was named to the NBA’s all-Defensive First Team for the first time.

Any questions or concerns about the Achilles affecting his play defensively were put to rest Monday night when he put the defensive clamps on Nicolas Batum who missed nine of his 11 shots from the field while primarily being guarded by Bradley.

Now his offense, that’s another story.

Bradley failed to reach double digits scoring for the first time this season as he missed seven of his nine shots on Monday to finish with just five points.

But part of that had to do with Bradley passing up shots he normally takes, as well as him missing some he normally knocks down.

Considering his lay-off and the rhythm his teammates have been in shooting the ball in his absence, Bradley wisely decided to get his defensive bearings on track and gradually bring his offensive game around. 

“I have to get my (shooting) rhythm back,” said Bradley who is making a career-best 40.9 percent of his 3-pointers this season. “I’m fine. I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s game.”