Davis: 'No need to hold back


Davis: 'No need to hold back

By Jessica Camerato

BOSTON -- Glen Davis was tired, and understandably so. In less than 48 hours he had played a game in Cleveland, flown back to Boston, and played another game the following night.

Along the way, he logged nearly 60 minutes on the court.

Of course Davis isn't the only athlete to go through this grind. Back-to-back contests in different cities is part of the NBA lifestyle.

But Davis did more than just play in two basketball games.

He played some of the best basketball of his career.

In the two games, Davis posted 33 points, 18 rebounds, and 5 assists off the bench. Add in last week's game against the New Jersey Nets and he is averaging 17 points and shooting better than 56 percent from the field (22-of-39 field-goal attempts) in his last three outings.

"I've just been getting the right shots at the right place," Davis told CSNNE.com. "Playing within the offense, knowing when I've got to shoot it, knowing when I shouldn't shoot it. My teammates have been hitting me while I've been open."

Davis explained his efficiency nonchalantly, but this is a significant improvement in his game. Last season he averaged 6.3 points (43.7 FG) in 17.3 minutes. This season Davis' role in the Celtics second unit has increased.

Part of it has to do with injuries -- Davis is bumped up in the rotation with Kendrick Perkins and Jermaine ONeal sidelined. Another part has to do with the fact that he has been a major contributor off the bench. His name has already been mentioned in Sixth Man of the Year conversations.

"He's just playing good team ball," said Shaquille O'Neal. "He's taking the wide-open shot when it's there and he's shooting a high proficiency."

Davis began the season on a rocky note when he expressed uncertainty about his role on the Celtics. Now he's riding the trust Doc Rivers has instilled in him. There is no more questioning his place on the team - or his shot on the court.

"I've been taking the open shots," he said. "There's no need to hold back, especially if it's within the offense. It's Doc having more trust in me, making sure I do what I have to do. He just says play your role, do what you've got to do."

The less Davis holds back, the further ahead the Celtics can go.

Jessica Camerato is on Twitter at http:twitter.comjcamerato

Celtics hope to rebound after being outplayed by Bulls on the boards

Celtics hope to rebound after being outplayed by Bulls on the boards

Following Thursday’s 105-99 loss to the Chicago Bulls, the Boston Celtics will be on the prowl to rebound – literally – from its first defeat of the season.

Because for all that did not go right in Thursday night’s loss, the way Boston was beaten on the boards stands out emphatically.

“They got 24 more shots than us. We only turned it over (12) times,” Celtics head coach Brad Stevens told reporters after the loss. “So that’s the obvious place they’re getting their possessions, on the glass. That’s going to be the number one thing, that has been the number one thing. It’s something we’ve talked about. We have to get better at it.”


Boston was out-rebounded 55-36 on the boards which heavily factored into Chicago’s 18-5 advantage in second-chance points.

In the Celtics' 122-117 win over Brooklyn on Wednesday, Boston won the overall rebounding battle 47-44, but had just 12 offensive rebounds compared to Brooklyn's 15 offensive boards. Despite the close margin, the Nets won the battle on the offensive glass running away, outscoring the Celtics 23-13 in second-chance points.

Stevens decided to start Tyler Zeller ahead of Amir Johnson to begin the third quarter, hoping Zeller would be a better matchup on the glass than Johnson who did not grab a single rebound in the 11 minutes of court time he got in the first half.

While Zeller did do a few good things on the glass and scoring in half-court sets, it wasn’t enough to swing the momentum Chicago was steadily gaining due to its ability to control the boards.

“I wasn’t real surprised but at the same time I knew it could happen,” Zeller told reporters, referring to Stevens’ decision to have him start the second half. “They did a good job of coming out and setting the tone. They beat us up on the boards, especially the first half. It’s something we have to get better at and continue to grow at.”

And it’s not a one-player or one-position issue, either.

Usually we think of bigs when it comes to rebounding. But Boston’s guards need to step up their rebounding game as well.

The struggles thus far have to be put in the context of this being just two games, the latter being the season opener for the Bulls who were jacked up more than usual due to it being the first game for Chicago native Dwyane Wade and ex-Celtic Rajon Rondo.

“We have to focus on boxing out,” said Boston’s Jaylen Brown. “Guards have to do a better job. Guys like me, Al (Horford), Amir (Johnson), Tyler (Zeller) ... We have to do a good job of coming in the weak side and grabbing those; just focus on it, pay more attention to detail.”