Celtics beat Orlando in Garnett's return, 109-106

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Celtics beat Orlando in Garnett's return, 109-106

By A. Sherrod Blakely
CSNNE.com

BOSTON With their defensive anchor back on the floor, the Boston Celtics closed out the Orlando Magic with - you guessed it - great defense.

And it was Kevin Garnett leading the late-game defensive surge, as the C's held on for a 109-106 win over the Magic Monday night.

Garnett finished with 19 points and 8 rebounds, but it was his steal and subsequent pass upcourt to Ray Allen who was immediately fouled, that sealed the Celtics victory.

Coach Doc Rivers said he didn't know what to expect from Garnett, who returned to action after missing the previous nine games with a muscle strain in his lower right leg.

"I knew he'd play with energy," Rivers said. "You could see that."

After the play, Garnett gave a stare into the jubilant crowd, the kind of look that the Garden faithful ate up entirely.

He was back.

He was active.

He was Kevin Garnett.

"It felt good," Garnett said of being back on the floor for the first time since suffering the injury at Detroit on Dec. 29. "I've been doing a lot of things to get back here and get strong, and I'm glad I was able to come out here and help my team out."

Garnett's late-game heroics were truly needed. Monday's matchup not being all that different than the Christmas Day game, as the teams staged a back-and-fourth battle that wasn't ultimately decided until the game's final moments.

Ray Allen and Orlando's Hedo Turkoglu exchanged one big shot for another in the game's final minutes.

And the officials, who were calling things relatively close most of the game, began to uh, look the other way at times down the stretch. That seemed to benefit the C's, who had several players in foul trouble.

After the loss, the Magic weren't looking to make any excuses.

There were several factors that contributed to their loss, but none seemed to stick out more than the Celtics' impressive shooting.

Boston shot 60 percent from the floor, compared to 45.9 percent by the Magic.

Even with the C's shooting so well, the game was relatively close most of the night.

"I don't know if it's a good thing or bad thing to be in a game that close where they shot 60 percent," said Magic coach Stan Van Gundy. "We're going to have to be better defensively then that. On the positive side, they had to shoot 60 percent to win a very close game. So I don't know there was some good things, but our defense has to change or we can't play at this level."

Rivers wasn't all that pleased with his team's play defensively for most of the game.

"I'm sure Coach Van Gundy is saying the same thing - we both prepared for this to be a defensive game," Rivers said. "And for three quarters, no one has heard that. The last three minutes, we turned back to who we are. We were a defensive team and became that, and that's why we won the game."

After Orlando got three cracks at taking the lead, the Celtics grabbed the rebound and called a time-out with 1:15 to play and the score tied at 102-102.

Out of the time-out, the Celtics got a pair of free throws from the ''new guy'' -- Garnett.

Garnett's two free throws gave the C's a 104-102 lead with 1:05 to play.

Orlando continued to battle, but the Celtics would never trail again.

The C's set the tone with an impressive start, which was one of the Magic's biggest concerns coming into the game.

"Getting off to a good start is big for us," Orlando forward Brandon Bass told CSNNE.com. "Especially on the road."

Things didn't quite work out the way Bass wanted, as the C's opened with a 15-6 before Van Gundy had seen enough and called a time-out.

A key to Boston's quick start was the play of Shaquille O'Neal.

After scoring just two points in an injury-plagued 13 minutes on Christmas against Orlando, O'Neal had 12 points and 2 blocked shots on Monday.

Boston also got a strong game from Glen Davis, who had 15 points as he reprised his usual role as an energy guy off the Celtics bench.

"Baby Davis back in his spot was great," Rivers said. "In a difficult spot, because playing Dwight Howard is never easy."

But the C's showed that even with Howard roaming around the basket, getting points in the paint is essential to beating the Magic.

Boston had 52 points in the paint compared to just 26 for Orlando in a game that had the look and feel of a playoff matchup.

"For both teams, you'll take as many as you can get," Rivers said. "It's always nice to have them. It is one of only 82 games, but the meaning of them - they don't mean a lot come playoff time because guys are coming back from injuries, back-to-backs - but they're just fun for the players. You find out a lot about your guys because of the execution and stuff like that."

A. Sherrod Blakely can be reached at sblakely@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sherrod on Twitter at http:twitter.comsherrodbcsn

A make-or-break season ahead for Kelly Olynyk?

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A make-or-break season ahead for Kelly Olynyk?

Every weekday until Sept. 7, we'll take a look at each player at the Celtics roster: Their strengths and their weaknesses, their ceiling and their floor. We continue today with Kelly Olynyk. For a look at the other profiles, click here.

BOSTON – The Celtics went into the playoffs last season well short of being at full strength. No player exemplified this more than Kelly Olynyk, a non-factor in postseason due to a right shoulder injury that required surgery in May.

He comes into this season facing a much stiffer route to playing time than his previous four seasons. While Jared Sullinger (Toronto) is gone, Boston brings in four-time All-Star Al Horford, in addition to returners Amir Johnson, Tyler Zeller and second-year big man Jordan Mickey, who is in line for a more expanded role this season.

Throw in the fact that Olynyk and the Celtics can reach terms on an extension before the start of the season (an unlikely occurrence because frankly it’s to both Boston and Olynyk’s benefit for him to be a restricted free agent next summer), and it’s clear just how important this season is to all involved.

Here’s a look at Olynyk’s ceiling as well as the floor for his game heading into this season.

The ceiling for Olynyk: Starter, Most Improved Player candidate

Kelly Olynyk has proven himself to be a much better contributor coming off the bench as opposed to starting. But no one will be shocked if Olynyk can play his way into a spot with the first group.  A 7-footer with legit 3-point range, Olynyk has shown flashes throughout his career of being a major problem for opponents because of his stretch-big skills.

And when teams have been a bit too eager in closing out or failed to box him out on a rebound, Olynyk has shown us all that “the bounce is real.”

He already ranks among the best big-man shooters all-time and needs just one made 3-pointer to join Dirk Nowitzki (1,701) and Andrea Bargnani (627) as the only 7-footers in league history with 500 or more made 3s.

In addition to making lots of 3s, Olynyk does it at a fairly efficient rate which can be seen in him shooting 40.5 percent on 3s last season which was tops among all NBA centers and made him one of just 20 players in the NBA to shoot at least 40 percent on 3s.

Although Olynyk’s defense has been considered among his biggest weaknesses, his defensive rating (points allowed per 100 possessions on the floor) of 97.7 was tops among Celtics players who logged at least 20 minutes per game last season.

If he can build off that, as well as continue to make teams pay with his long-range shooting, Olynyk could be one of the breakout performers this season for the Celtics and find himself on the short list of the NBA’s most improved players.

The bigger issue with Olynyk centers around his struggles holding position in the post as a rebounder. Because he’s a stretch big, you know he’s not going to haul in a ton of boards for you.

But he has to be better than last season when he grabbed 4.1 rebounds, which continued what has been a career regression in this area.

After averaging 5.2 boards as a rookie, he slipped to 4.7 in his second season and averaged a career-low 4.1 last season.

The floor for Olynyk: Active roster

Talk to anyone within the Celtics organization and they will not hesitate to point out the skillset that Olynyk has and how important he could potentially be for this team going forward.

Still, that’s part of the problem.

Olynyk has shown promise to be more than just a player in the rotation. He has the kind of skills that if he were to deliver them with more consistency, he would immediately become one of the team’s standout performers which would make Boston a much, much tougher team to defend.

But his game has been one marred by injuries and inconsistent play which, as you might expect, go hand-in-hand.

Even with what has been an uneven career, Olynyk has still managed to be a double-digit scorer in each of the past two seasons.

And his net rating (offensive rating minus defensive rating) of +5.2 is tops among players logging 20 or more minutes, too.

But even if he doesn’t elevate his game defensively or become a more reliable rebounder for Boston, Olynyk won’t be suiting up in street clothes as a healthy scratch anytime soon.

Olynyk has too much talent, and when you look at this Celtics roster, he fits a clear and well-defined need.

Pace and space remain keys to what Brad Stevens is trying to do with the Celtics and Olynyk’s strengths are an ideal addition.

But as we have seen with Stevens in the past, he’s not afraid to take a player out of the starting lineup or regular rotation, and bench them from time to time.

Just as it won’t surprise anyone to see Olynyk play a more prominent role potentially as a starter, the same is true if he struggles and finds himself racking up a few DNP-CDs (did not play- coaches decision) either.

But Olynyk has too much talent to fall too far off the Celtics’ radar, especially when you look at this roster and realize there’s no other player quite like him in terms of combining size, skill and perimeter shooting.

 

 

 

 

 

     

Could the '80s Celtics have won eight championships?

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Could the '80s Celtics have won eight championships?

In this episode, we sit-down with one of the best basketball writers in the country, Jackie MacMullan. Jackie covered the Celtics for the Boston Globe for several years, and collaborated with Larry Bird on his auto-biography. 

Jim Aberdale, producer of CSN’s documentary on the ‘86 Celtics, talks with MacMullan about the bitter rivalry between the Celtics and Lakers during the 80’s, how the tragedies the Celtics faced following the ‘86 title were difficult to believe, and covering the Golden Age of the NBA.

Ceiling-to-Floor profile: Smart's defense gives him a shot at stardom

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Ceiling-to-Floor profile: Smart's defense gives him a shot at stardom

Every weekday until Sept. 7, we'll take a look at each player at the Celtics roster: Their strengths and their weaknesses, their ceiling and their floor. We continue today with Marcus Smart. For a look at the other profiles, click here.

BOSTON --  As a member of the USA Select Team this summer, Marcus Smart had a chance to play with and against some of the NBA's best. 
 
Not surprisingly, Smart played physical defense.
 
He made a few shots, too. 

Smart delivered the kind of all-around performance in Las Vegas that left an indelible impression as to the potential he has to become one of the better guards in the NBA someday. 

But will that day be this season?
 
After all, Isaiah Thomas is an All-Star point guard and his backcourt mate Avery Bradley is a first-team All-NBA defender. Their presence has certainly limited some of the opportunities Smart has had to display his skills.
 
But that won’t keep him off the floor this season or from logging significant minutes as the Celtics look to continue their ascension up the Eastern Conference standings.
 
Here’s a look at the ceiling for Smart’s game this season as well as the floor.
 
The ceiling for Smart: Starter, All-NBA defensive selection

 
Smart continues to make his mark on the NBA with his defense, combining some really nifty physical skills with an absolute bad-ass mentality towards locking up whoever he's assigned to defend. 
 
The 6-foot-4 Smart will tackle smaller guards like Matthew Dellavedova, or play a little bump-and-grind on the block with 7-footer Kristaps Porzingis. Stints defending elite scorers like LeBron James, Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook are part of the job defensively for Smart, as well. 
 
Of course, Smart gets a heavy dose of praise for his physical play defensively, but so much of what he does centers around his hustle and overall effort.

In what was a season which Smart’s hustle play was recognized with a few All-NBA Defensive Team votes, one of the more memorable moments came when he was able to out-hustle San Antonio’s Tony Parker for a loose ball, leadin g to a Boston lay-up. 

But any tale about Smart’s effort defensively has to also include some mention of flopping, something he's been accused of from time to time. And on more than one occasion he's been guilty of this, without question.  
 
Still, with his aggressiveness and resume full of difference-making, high impact plays in his first two NBA seasons, there’s no reason to doubt Smart will become officially one of the league’s top defenders and occupy a spot on the NBA’s All-Defensive Teams sooner or later, and with that a potential spot as a starter.
 
For that latter point to happen, Smart’s shooting has to improve appreciably. Last season he shot 25.3 percent on 3s, with a career 29.6 percent shooting mark from 3-point range. 
 
With Evan Turner (Portland) no longer with the Celtics, Smart should have a few more opportunities to score now than he had in the past.
 
And while no deal is imminent, Bradley’s name was among those thrown around as possibly being on the move this season. If the Celtics decide to go that route, that, too, would open up an opportunity for Smart to become a starter. 
 
The floor for Smart: Rotation player
 
If Smart doesn’t make the kind of strides he and the Celts are aiming for this season, worst-case scenario is he will remain a player in the Celtics’ regular rotation. 
 
His versatility as a defender is just too valuable to leave at the end of their bench, regardless of how much he may struggle at times offensively.
 
If he continues to struggle, the more he’ll be seen as a one-dimensional (defense) player and with that, see his role -- and potential playing time -- more limited.
 
But coming off the bench, Smart has shown himself capable of holding his own as a defender against some of the backcourt scorers in the NBA. 
 
Lou Williams, the league’s Sixth Man of the Year in 2015, was a 33.3 percent shooter against Smar,t according to nbasavant.com. Other big-time scorers such as Westbrook (4-for-11, 36.4 percent), Kemba Walker (3-for-11, 27.3 percent) and high-scoring guard James Harden (3-for-10, 30 percent) have all had their share of struggles knocking down shots when Smart has been defending them.
 
Both Smart and the Celtics are optimistic that his shooting will only improve with time. But in case he continues to have problems, Boston can take solace in the fact that it has one of the more promising, up-and-coming defenders in Smart, whose play at that end of the floor is good enough to where minutes will continue to come his way regardless of what he contributes offensively.