Ainge has Boston feeling Green

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Ainge has Boston feeling Green

By Rich Levine
CSNNE.com

When Jeff Green joined the Celtics in February, Danny Ainge and Doc Rivers gave off the impression that theyd found the next James Posey. Of course, it turns out they were setting the bar way too high.

In the two and a half months Green was in Boston, he never came close to filling Poseys long-departed role. Green was never comfortable coming off the bench, he was never a great, or even good, defender and most of all, he never embraced the big moments. Posey may have been the toughest, grittiest, and one of the most confident guys the Celtics had back in 2008. The brighter the lights, the better the Posey. Thats what endeared him so well to fans, teammates and coaches alike. Posey was a gamer, regardless of the situation.

Jeff Green is not. Or, at least, he isn't yet.

Sure, he had his moments over the course of the playoffs. There were flashes, as always, when you thought to yourself, Hey, this kid might not be that bad. According to Ainge, Green was Bostons most efficient player in the postseason, which may be true, but is just as meaningless. Efficiency aside, Green was not a guy the Celtics could count on. He was completely overwhelmed by the atmosphere, and if the Celtics had advanced, that only would have gotten worse.

His fumbled pass at the end of Game 5 was the perfect example. And Im not saying that thats the reason why the Celtics lost the game. But that turnover was a product of nothing other than a guy who was terrified to be out there; who wasnt ready for that kind of pressure. A guy who sure as hell doesnt have it in him to be the next James Posey.

But to Ainges credit, he realized that. Speaking on WEEI yesterday, he admitted that Green didnt adjust to that role as well as they would have liked. And looking back (this is me speaking, not Danny), it was probably unfair of Ainge and Rivers to ever even mention Poseys name along with Green. Like I said, it set the bar too high. And lets be honest, this kid already had big enough shoes to fill.

Greens performance in Boston will always be tied to Kendrick Perkins absence. For as long as Green wears the Green, hell be held to a higher standard than most players in his position. It doesnt matter if Perks knees give way next season or he continues to play out a mediocre existence in OKC, Green will always be the guy who was worth breaking up the Celtics for. The fans wont forget that. His teammates (the four that matter most, at least) wont forget that. For all that Perk wasnt, he was a guy that the Big Four felt comfortable and confident taking into battle. Green isnt there. In fact, hes not even close.

And believe me, this had an effect on team down the stretch.

When people talk about the trade, its still mostly about Xs and Os. They talk about things like offensive efficiency or the fact that Perk hasnt played that well in OKC. Its about what each respective guy is doing in a vacuum on the court, and obviously I get that. But these Celtics were never just about Xs and Os. The Celtics were a team, and that bond went far beyond numbers. It was about respect, trust and friendship. It transcended age, speed, athleticism and sometimes even talent. And regardless of where you stand on the Perk trade, you have to admit that that was gone as soon as Perk boarded that plane to OKC. The trade killed the Celtics' chemistry, and they never found it again.

You can talk about efficiency all you want, but that doesnt change the fact the Celtics never completely accepted Jeff Green in that locker room. They never accepted most of the new guys. In a way, you wish they could have just let bygones be bygones and everyone could have been best friends, but you know its not that easy. Were talking about three of the greatest player in NBA history, plus one of the most talented, enigmatic point guards in the league. That respect isnt given; it has to be earned. And Green didn't do much to earn it. Hell, it took the Big 3 nearly three years to even accept Rondo and that was after they won a title together. They had to go through a lot to get to the point where they are now, and with Green theyve barely scratched the surface.

Which makes what happened with Ainge on the radio yesterday so perplexing. Two and a half months, after setting the bar too high on Green, and ultimately realizing that he wouldnt and couldnt be the next James Posey, Ainge essentially suggested that Green can now become the next Paul Pierce. Whether or not what Ainge suggested that Pierce might come off the bench, so that Green can excel as a starter will actually ever happen, the seed has been planted, and Im not optimistic about how it will grow.

Ainge has created a situation where, as long as Green is coming off the bench, that will be the reason that hes not contributing. Its now: This trade that we shook the team up for will not be worth as much as we thought it would be until Jeff Green is starting" which is essentially means until Paul Pierce isnt. Just a reminder: Pierce signed an extension last summer through 2014.

Do you think Pierce enjoyed hearing that? Do you think Pierce would ever even consider coming off the bench? Thats crazy. Thats an insult. And its just going to make this whole thing more complicated. It goes against the very tenants that made this team so great, and just piggy backs on everything that was ruined when Perk was sent away. It created more inner turmoil, more drama, more reasons to second guess everything.

It made it less likely for these two to ever accept each other, or for the Celtics to ever find the same unity they once did. Now, not only is Jeff Green the guy who was worth giving up Perk for, but now hes also the guy moving Pierce to the bench? Whats that even mean? How can, or will, that ever happen? Why even plant that seed?

Maybe its Ainge just trying to do anything he can to salvage a trade that merely hasnt worked out, and one that may come to be the second most memorable (after KG) of his tenure in Boston. Im not one of those people who think that the Celtics would have beat the Heat if Kendrick Perkins was still there, but Ill certainly argue that the trade did not make them better. I dont know how anyone can argue that. Ainge said that the trade would give the Celtics a greater chance to win this year, and that certainly didnt happen. And dont give me the deal on how they were counting on Shaq to be healthy because that just makes it worse. Why would you ever count on Shaq being healthy?

I dont know, maybe hes just grasping at straws. Maybe hes just in a little bit of a panic. And moving forward, no ones exactly sure what road the Celtics will take with Green, Pierce and the rest of the team. But heres one thing Im pretty confident in.

This is going to get worse before it gets better.

Rich Levine's column runs each Monday, Wednesday and Friday on CSNNE.com. Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrlevine33

Phil Jackson: Knicks' biggest mistake was not trading for Jae Crowder in 2014

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Phil Jackson: Knicks' biggest mistake was not trading for Jae Crowder in 2014

Knicks president Phil Jackson’s biggest mistake? Taking the job in the first place?

Well, besides that. Jackson tells Today’s Fastbreak that it was not getting Jae Crowder when he had the chance.

Here’s Jackson quote, part of a long interview with Charley Rosen: 

"I think my biggest mistake was actually this…One of the first deals I engineered when I came back to New York was to trade Tyson Chandler and Raymond Felton to Dallas for Shane Larkin, Jose Calderon, Wayne Ellington, Samuel Dalembert, plus a second-round pick that the Mavs owed to the Celtics. In talking with Boston, I was given the option of taking that pick or else taking Jae Crowder. I liked Crowder but I thought he wouldn't get much of a chance to play behind Carmelo, so I took the pick, which turned out to be Cleanthony Early. While Cleanthony has missed lots of time in the past two seasons with us, he still has the potential to be a valuable player. Even so, I should have taken Crowder."

Jackson’s timeline is actually a little off. The Chandler and Felton to the Mavs deal was actually in June 2014. The Celtics, of course, acquired Crowder at the December 2014 trade deadline in the deal that sent Rajon Rondo to the Mavericks. Still, you get the point. Jackson covets Jae Crowder, who has proven to be a little more valuable than Cleanthony Early. And, in light of where NBA salaries have gone, the five-year, $35 million deal Crowder signed with the Celtics last offseason now seems like one of the biggest bargains in the NBA. 

 

 

Can Jerebko parlay playoff starts to a bigger role with Celtics?

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Can Jerebko parlay playoff starts to a bigger role with Celtics?

Every weekday until Sept. 7, we'll take a look at each player at the Celtics roster: Their strengths and their weaknesses, their ceiling and their floor. We continue today with Tyler Zeller. For a look at the other profiles, click here.

BOSTON – Considering all the different storylines that developed among the Celtics at the end of last season and this summer, it’s easy to forget that Jonas Jerebko was in the starting lineup.

With sporadic minutes in the regular season, Boston found itself trailing the Atlanta Hawks 2-0 in their best-of-seven playoff series.

So what did coach Brad Stevens do?

He shook up the starting lineup by inserting Jerebko. who helped Boston even up the series at two games apiece before the Hawks bounced back and ended the Celtics season after six games.

Those last four games against the Hawks – the only games Jerebko started all season - served as a reminder to many that the 29-year-old could still be an impact performer.

It was the kind of run to close out the season that Jerebko will certainly be focused on trying to build upon this season.

The ceiling for Jerebko: Starter

While he will likely begin the season as a reserve, Jerebko will certainly come into camp with a little more bounce in his step courtesy of a strong showing in the playoffs.

After averaging just 4.4 points and 3.7 rebounds in 15.1 minutes in the regular season a year ago, Jerebko became a major force in the playoffs for Boston.

In his first game as a starter, Jerebko had a double-double of 11 points and 12 rebounds as Boston won Game 3, 111-103.

He was even more impactful 48 hours later with another a second straight double-double (16 points, 10 rebounds) in yet another Celtics victory.

The Hawks made some adjustments in Games 5 and 6 to close out the series, but it wasn’t before Jerebko had put together the best postseason stretch of his career.

Compared to the regular season, Jerebko more than doubled his playing time in those final four games by averaging 31.3 minutes to go with 11.5 points and 7.8 rebounds.

Jerebko will be hard-pressed to return to that role at the start of this season.

Boston signed Al Horford to a four-year, $113 million contract, so you know he’s starting.

And Amir Johnson’s defense and ability to run the floor so effectively will likely result in him resuming a starting role, too.

That leaves Jerebko joining what looks to be a very talented and deep Celtics bench.

Even though he’s unlikely to start, Jerebko will get his share of opportunities to play.

At 6-foot-10, Jerebko has the size to play both power forward and center. And depending on the opposing team’s lineup, Jerebko has the potential play some small forward as well.

It was that versatility that made Stevens turn to Jerebko in the playoffs last season to replace Jared Sullinger, who signed with the Toronto Raptors in the offseason.

And while the idea of Jerebko as a starter seems a bit far-fetched at this point, he is yet another Celtics reserve who has proven himself to be ready to play and play well when given an opportunity to step on the floor regardless of what that role may be.

The floor for Jerebko: Seldom-used reserve

Despite a strong finish last season, Jerebko will once again have to fight and claw for any minutes on the floor. While the Celtics certainly were aided by his versatility, this season’s roster has a number of players who, like Jerebko, can play multiple positions at both ends of the floor.

NBA veteran Gerald Green is 6-8 and will play shooting guard and small forward. But depending on the lineup, it’s not a stretch to envision him playing some power forward. Ditto for rookie Jaylen Brown and starting small forward Jae Crowder sliding up one position.

Beginning the season on the rotation fringes is nothing new to Jerebko, whose role was very much up in the air when the Celtics traded Tayshaun Prince to Detroit prior to the 2015 trade deadline for Jerebko and Gigi Datome.

Gradually, Jerebko earned his minutes and proved he was indeed a valuable piece of what Stevens and the Celtics were trying to build here in Boston.

And now, with a season-plus of time with the Celtics under his belt, Jerebko finds himself once again being challenged to show that he’s more than just a body on the roster.

 

Report: Celtics renounce draft rights to 2013 pick Colton Iverson

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Report: Celtics renounce draft rights to 2013 pick Colton Iverson

By Dan Feldman, NBCSports.com Pro Basketball Talk

The Celtics bought the No. 53 pick in the 2013 NBA draft to get Colton Iverson out of Colorado State, and he thanked them by allowing them to keep his rights the last three years.

Iverson rejected the required tender – a one-year contract, surely unguaranteed at the minimum, teams must extend to retain exclusive negotiating rights to a second-round pick – year after year to sign overseas. Accepting the tender would’ve likely meant Iverson going to Boston’s training camp and getting waived. Perhaps, the timing of that would’ve limited his European options that year. But it would’ve made him an NBA free agent – or, best-case scenario, he could’ve made the Celtics and drawn an NBA paycheck.

As it was, Iverson limited himself to joining Boston and only Boston. If another NBA team wanted Iverson, it would have had to trade for him.

And what does Iverson get for that loyalty? A Celtics contract with at least a partial guarantee?

Nope.

Just a head start on finding another team – which he could’ve gotten for himself three years ago.

Adam Himmelsbach of The Boston Globe:

This is why second-round picks should be more aggressive about accepting the required tender. Even if you get waived, you open NBA options.

Iverson is a strong 7-foot center who plays with physicality. He can help in certain matchups, and he’d make sense as a third center on teams that have first- and second-stringers playing a different style.

But Iverson is 27, and his NBA window may be closing if it hasn’t already.

It’s a shame he spent so many years beholden to Boston, which didn’t want him.

It was probably just courtesy of the Celtics to renounce his rights now rather than have him sign the tender. They would have guaranteed him no money with the tender, and they could have gotten a few minor benefits with it – an extra body for training camp, the ability to assign his D-League rights to their affiliate after waiving him and the slightest chance he impresses enough in the preseason to hold trade value.

But them forgoing those potential advantages, even if out of courtesy, also sends a signal about how little they value him. Teams don’t do these types of favors for players they actually covet.