Ailing Davis holds himself accountable

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Ailing Davis holds himself accountable

By Jessica Camerato
CSNNE.com

BOSTON - Glen Davis estimates he drank four gallons of Pedialyte. His fever was running between 102 and 103 degrees (among other undesirable ailments), and he contemplated whether or not he would even play.

But he made the decision to take the court on Wednesday against the Denver Nuggets, and by the end of the game he wasnt giving himself any leeway for being under-the-weather.

Davis (16 points) held himself accountable for the performance of the second unit, which allowed the Nuggets to chip away at a nearly 20-point lead during the Cs 105-89 victory.

It wasnt too good to be true, he said of the Celtics 19-point edge in the first quarter. Were capable of doing that. But I didnt lead the second team good enough for us to keep that lead.

Doc Rivers praised his team for being an unselfish club and was happy with the way the starters shared the ball early on. But that changed when he turned to the bench.

To me, the second unit came in and they did the exact opposite, Rivers said. They miss a couple shots, the ball starts sticking, and then they start getting back at each other by not passing, and they forgot what we do. They stopped playing defense.

That doesnt sit well with Davis.

He views himself as the connection between the first unit and the second unit given the amount of minutes he plays with the starting five. Davis believes that he, Nate Robinson, and Marquis Daniels, are the biggest factors off the bench when the Celtics starters are out of the game.

And he takes his leadership role very seriously.

When I notice things like that, I need to adjust, I need to motivate, I need to do something out there because Im the guy that makes the second team go, he said. Im a mirror of the first team because I play a lot with the first team. So Ive got to somehow, some way, get the same momentum from the first team and use it to transfer to the second team.

Davis found himself playing with a little bit too much momentum on Wednesday when he got whistled for a double technical foul against Nene. The two got tangled up late in the fourth quarter and Davis was led away from the incident by Kevin Garnett.

Just two guys physically playing hard, explained Davis. He was playing a little out of control, hit me with an elbow, didnt like it, kind of got him off me, told me dont hit me with an elbow. No more. But thats it. Thats the nature of the game. Thats the way it is. Emotions, people play.

Davis understands what he has to do to play within the system and fuel the Celtics second unit. Now it is a matter of demonstrating it on the court.

Practice, good habits, paying attention to what the coaches want us to do, being a leader, he said of his methods. Making sure that I lead the second team, things like that. When things are going wrong, make sure that Im there to say, Hey guys, we need to play harder defense or Hey guys, we need to run this play.

With a bottle of orange Pedialyte in hand, Davis showed the maturity and accountability of someone eager to be a leader.

Follow Jessica Camerato on Twitter at http:www.twitter.comjcameratonba

C's players mull how to utilize platform as athletes for social commentary

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C's players mull how to utilize platform as athletes for social commentary

WALTHAM -- The national anthem protests by NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick have had an undeniable ripple effect on professional sports teams across the country. And that includes the Boston Celtics.
 
“We as an organization know what’s going on,” said Marcus Smart. “We read and see and hear about it every day. It’s a sensitive subject for everybody.”
 
While it’s unlikely that Celtics players will do something similar to Kaepernick taking a knee during the playing of the national anthem, there’s no question some are figuring out the best way to utilize their platform as athletes to express their views on current social issues.
 
“Us athletes have to take advantage of the stage we’re on,” said Jae Crowder. “Try to make a positive out it. You can’t fix negative problems with negative energy. I don’t want to do anything negative; I want to do something positive, shed light on the situation.”
 
Kaepernick, a quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, and a number of professional athletes have tried to have more attention paid to recent killings of African-Americans by police officers where, based on the video footage, it appears excessive or unnecessary force was used.
 
It is a topic that has brought a wide range of responses from many in the sports world, including the dean of NBA coaches, San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich.
 
During the Spurs’ media day this week, he was asked about the Kaepernick’s protests.
 
“I absolutely understand why they’re doing what they’re doing, and I respect their courage for what they’ve done,” Popovich told reporters. “The question is whether it will do any good or not because it seems that change really seems to happen through political pressure, no matter how you look at it.”
 
As examples of the political pressure he was referring to, Popovich mentioned Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s ability to galvanize group, as well as the NBA and other organizations pulling their events out of the state of North Carolina because of its legislation as it relates to the rights of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community.
 
“The important thing that Kaepernick and others have done is keep it in the conversation,” Popovich said.
 
And while there may be differing opinions as to whether Kaepernick or any other athlete should be protesting, the one common thread that seems to bind the Celtics players and the front office is them having the right to speak out not only as professional athletes, but Americans.
 
“The biggest thing is we all really value the freedoms that we have and that we’ve been allotted,” said coach Brad Stevens, who added that he has had individual discussions with players on this subject. “We certainly support an individual’s freedoms. It’s been great to engage in those discussions. It’s been really fun for me how excited our guys are about using their platform.”
 
And that more than anything else is why Crowder feels the Celtics have to have a united front as far as the message they present to the masses.
 
“If we want change we have to do it together,” Crowder said. “I feel like those guys (other athletes) used their platforms well. I think more athletes should do the same. You can’t do it with any hatred; you can’t do it with any negative. You have to do it with positive energy.”