Celtics not interested in Wallace

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Celtics not interested in Wallace

BOSTON Kind of like his time with the Boston Celtics, the talk of a possible Rasheed Wallace return seems to be coming to an end quicker than expected.

A league source told CSNNE.com Friday morning that the Boston Celtics have no interest in bringing the 37-year-old veteran back to the team.

Wallace retired following the 2010 season which ended with the C's losing to the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Finals. Boston reached a buyout with him on the remaining years of his contract, which made him an unrestricted free agent.

The C's would have a number of concerns about adding him now, with none bigger than his conditioning.

"It was bad when he played. How is it going to be now?" the source said.

Danny Ainge, Boston's president of basketball operations, declined to comment on Wallace's potential return to the NBA.

Ainge did tell CSNNE.com that he will continue to keep an eye out for potential additions to the roster, but isn't in a hurry to make any significant changes.

"If there's one player that's going to come in and make a difference, that we can get for a minimum contract, we'll look into that, for sure," Ainge said.

The C's can't make trades with players signed or drafted until March 1. Instead, Ainge is more concerned with the team's growth from within.

Specifically, he wants to see more consistent play out of the team's core group which consists of Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen and Rajon Rondo.

"Our team's success is going to be determined by the play of our four all-stars," Ainge said. "I always believe that. KG and Paul need to play at a certain level. Rajon and Ray have been playing at a high level. That's going to be the determining factor."

Ainge added, "I'm seriously not panicked. I want to see our team play as well as we're capable of playing, and we haven't. I'm not going to focus as much on the record, as what I see on the court. I have a lot of faith in Paul, Ray and KG. And obviously Rondo, who has consistently been our best player.

"I've just seen the pride; I've seen the way they go about their business. Paul had zero training camp, and is basically working his way back into shape in games, trying to do what he can to help our team. As he gets healthier and we get closer to being at full strength, I like our team and our chances at success."

Ainge on no trades at deadline: ‘Wasn’t for lack of trying’

Ainge on no trades at deadline: ‘Wasn’t for lack of trying’

For the second straight season the trade deadline came and went with no moves from the Boston Celtics.

President of basketball operations Danny Ainge continues to look at the big picture as his team moves forward with their roster intact.

“It wasn’t for lack of trying, last year and this year,” said Ainge. “We came away with Al Horford in the summer. We drafted Jaylen Brown, Jaylen just continually getting better. I’m very excited about the future of both those guys. We were also able to get Ante Zizic, who is having a terrific year over in Turkey. I think that our future is looking good.

“We hope to have another good summer this year, whether we use the draft pick, whether we trade the draft pick. I think we can’t go wrong, as long as we don’t screw it up and pay too much for certain assets.”

Ainge: Adding players 'sometimes messes up your chemistry’

Ainge: Adding players 'sometimes messes up your chemistry’

With the NBA trade deadline in the rear view mirror, the Celtics will have to turn to the buyout market if they are looking to make changes to their roster.

Talking to CSN Celtics Insider A. Sherrod Blakely, Danny Ainge explained why signing players who have  been bought out can be a risky move for a team like the Celtics.

“We’ll weigh each guy that comes on the market and see if that can be a boost to our team,” explained Ainge. “At the same time, I like our team. Bringing in new players sometimes messes up your whole chemistry, and it shifts somebody into a different role that they’re not accustomed to doing. You better know what you’re getting.

“We brought in Michael Finley, Sam Cassell. . . PJ Brown turned out to be a very good asset to us. Most of the time it sort of disrupts things. At the end of the year you go, ‘wow, we probably shouldn’t have done that.’ Even though on paper it looked like a great acquisition, it wasn’t as good as everyone thought it would be.”