Celtics-Bobcats review: What we saw . . .

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Celtics-Bobcats review: What we saw . . .

CHARLOTTE, N.C. The Boston Celtics are a team that prides itself on being able to execute down the stretch in close games, which was exactly what they did in defeating the Charlotte Bobcats, 94-82. Beating the Bobcats is nothing to brag about. Teams have been doing it - a lot - all season. But for Boston, known for playing down to the level of their competition, to get the win without Ray Allen (ankle), Paul Pierce (toe) and Kevin Garnett (rest), speaks volumes to how deep the C's are this season.

"They have so many good players," said Bobcats guard Gerald Henderson. "Toward the end of the game, we just couldn't come up with the plays and the stops to make a run."

Charlotte cut Boston's lead down to just four points with 6:55 to play following a dunk by Derrick Brown. The C's responded with a 10-2 run that put them up by double-digits, a position of control they were able to maintain for the rest of the game.

For Boston, making all the right plays in a close game isn't anything new.

But doing so without Allen, Pierce and Garnett, well that's a little different.

"It builds their confidence, and for some guys it just lets you know, be ready," said C's forward Brandon Bass. "To constantly work on your game throughout the year and on a night like tonight, your number might be called."

Indeed, the C's collectively being ready to play was a factor in Saturday's victory. Here we'll re-examine some keys to the game identified earlier, and how they actually played out.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: When facing a team like the Bobcats, it's important for Boston to establish control of the game from the outset. That shouldn't be a problem against a Charlotte team that is next-to-last in the NBA in first-quarter points, with 21.7 per game. Meanwhile, the C's boost a defense that gives up 22.6 points in the first quarter - only five teams in the league give up fewer points in the first quarter.

WHAT WE SAW: After a fairly close first quarter, Boston closed the first out with an 11-2 run to take a comfortable 34-23 lead going into the second quarter which sent a clear message that despite being without their Big Three, the C's meant business. "You could see before the game, they really wanted this game; they really did," said C's coach Doc Rivers. "They assume when you sit guys, you're just going to show up and play. And our guys, you could see in their demeanor in the locker room I didn't know if we were going to win or not, but I knew we were going to play hard and right."

MATCHUP TO WATCH: Brandon Bass vs. Byron Mullens: Bass' ability to defend and rebound at a high level, have been huge factors in Boston's success of late. In Mullens, he faces a player with the size of a true center, but with great range - even past the 3-point line - on his shot. It'll be important for Bass to use his quickness at both ends of the floor for the C's to win this matchup.

WHAT WE SAW: Mullens only played about 22 minutes off the bench, and was a non-factor with just six points and three rebounds. Bass delivered another strong game for the Celtics with 22 points along with nine rebounds. He also was a factor defensively by blocking three shots and contesting a number of other Charlotte misses. "Brandon is the unknown guy," Rivers said. "He's been doing the exact same thing, rebounding and making shots."

PLAYER TO WATCH: If Kevin Garnett does not play, that will most likely mean Greg Stiemsma will start and Ryan Hollins will become the first (and only) big man off the bench. We have all seen what Stiemsma has done when given an opportunity to play a more meaningful role. It'll be interesting to see how Hollins handles this chance to play decent minutes.

WHAT WE SAW: Arguably the one Celtic who has maximized his opportunity to play, Stiemsma was solid in the middle for Boston. Filling in for Garnett at center, Stiemsma had eight points while making all four of his shot attempts, along with grabbing five rebounds and of course, blocking a few - OK, quite a few - shots along the way. Stiemsma was credited with six blocked shots - that was one more than the entire Bobcats team. "Greg, defensively, is a force," Rivers said. "He's a great shot-blocker. I don't think the officials even know that yet because the way he goes after them."

STAT TO TRACK: Charlotte has been a team where a sizable chunk of their scoring comes from their bench. So for Boston, it'll be important to not allow the Charlotte starters to catch fire. This season, the Bobcats starters average 54.2 points which ranks 29th in the NBA. Conversely, the C's first group has averaged 68.5 points which ranks seventh in the NBA.

WHAT WE SAW: Charlotte got 61 points from its starters, although one of them - Derrick Brown - had 15 points and usually did most of his damage against Boston off the bench. The Celtics' patchwork starting lineup did a good job defensively in addition to finding various ways of generating their own scoring. Boston's starting five on Sunday tallied 83 of the team's 94 points which included the C's Big Three - on this night anyway - of Rajon Rondo (20 points), Avery Bradley (22 points) and Brandon Bass (22 points) combining for 64 points. "Those were the three guys we said we had to get points from and they did it," Rivers said. "So that was nice."

Friday, Feb. 24: 'Slap Shot' turns 40

Friday, Feb. 24: 'Slap Shot' turns 40

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while always holding a special place in my heart for Dickie Dunn as my favorite "Slap Shot" character. If Dickie Dunn wrote it, then it must be true.

*The ESPN hockey crew puts together some of their best scenes and favorite lines from "Slap Shot" as the movie hits 40 years old. I was first introduced to Slap Shot in my high school years and I liked it for the Hanson Brothers as much as for anything else, but that is a movie that just gets better and better every time I watch it. And I’ve watched it dozens and dozens of times. God bless Paul Newman for agreeing to lend his Hollywood star power to such a crazy, hilarious and raucous love letter to hockey.

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) Brian Wilde is recognizing the limitations of the Canadiens even under new coach Claude Julien.

*Bryan Bickell is stepping even closer to a return to the Carolina Hurricanes as he battles through his MS diagnosis.

*Kevin Shattenkirk apparently turned down a sign-and-trade with the Tampa Bay Lightning this season, and also turned down a chance to get dealt to the Edmonton Oilers last summer as well. I think the Blues D-man has a short list of teams he wants to sign with as a free agent, and neither one of those teams is on the list.

*Darren Dreger weighs in on Shattenkirk as well, and the price tag of a top prospect, first-round pick and NHL player for the puck-moving rental D-man seems very excessive.

*Things are coming to a head with Evander Kane and the Buffalo Sabres as he takes his play to a high level in Buff over the last few months.

*Interesting piece on Ed Snider’s daughter becoming an advocate for medicinal marijuana after his father’s health battles.

*For something completely different: Looks like a new season of "The Voice" coming our way.


 

'Why would the girls be treated any differently than the boys?'

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'Why would the girls be treated any differently than the boys?'

I grew up playing sports. For the most part I played soccer, but I also ran cross-country and track, I skied, snowboarded, and, at one point, I tried gymnastics. (It wasn't pretty.) My two younger sisters did the same. Our parents ran themselves ragged driving us to practices and tournaments, arranging carpools and fundraisers.

It never crossed our minds that we were girls playing sports. It's just what we did. And we loved it!

I didn't realize how lucky I was until visiting my grandparents in rural Ohio one summer. I found an old photo of their high school graduating class. I asked my grandmother what sports she played in school and I'll never forget her answer: "Oh, there were no sports for girls back then. We could cheer for the boys basketball team, but that was it."

I was shocked. I thought that was ridiculous. Why would the girls be treated any differently than the boys? I couldn't comprehend it.

Looking back, I'm so thankful I grew up in a time and environment where that wasn't the case. I can't imagine my life without sports. Not only because it's what I do for a living, but because playing sports throughout my childhood is a big part of what made me the person I am today.

Sports taught me the value of hard work. Being part of a team, I learned how to communicate and work with people to accomplish a common goal . . . and discovered just how gratifying the process can be. I became a teammate and leader who earned respect and empowered others. I made lasting friendships while stuffed like a sardine in a travel van singing Ace of Base at the top of my lungs. I wouldn't trade those experiences for anything. And I certainly wouldn't be in the position I'm in without them.

Don't get me wrong; it hasn't all been positive. Now that I'm a woman working in sports, I've had other kinds of eye-opening moments. During an interview for my first on-air job I was asked, in so many words, if this is really a career for me or if I had other plans after I found a husband. Once I did land a job, I covered many college football games by myself. There was one small school in particular whose players relentlessly catcalled me on the sidelines. I won't repeat the foul things they said, but I can tell you I went home feeling very dirty (and it wasn't because I  was pouring sweat after lugging a camera that weighed half as much as I did from end zone to end zone in the middle of an Alabama summer). Even now, every so often, social media has a special way of reminding me how some people still view women in sports. Surprise -- it's not good.

But if that's the worst I have to go through, I know I can't complain. My only focus is doing my job to the very best of my abilities and working as hard as I possibly can to continue to grow and get better. We've come a long way. I'm so grateful for those who blazed the trail and made it possible for me to do what I do. And, thanks to my grandmother, I will never take my opportunities for granted. My hope is that when my daughter grows up, she will be just as surprised and appalled by some of my bad experiences as I was talking to my grandmother that day.