Celtics' Allen contemplates future roles in NBA

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Celtics' Allen contemplates future roles in NBA

BOSTON -- Prior to the start of his third game off the Boston Celtics bench, Ray Allen discussed a series of possible scenarios affecting his future in the NBA.

Allen, 36, had started in nearly every game of his 16-year career before becoming part of the Celtics second unit last Thursday following his return from an ankle injury.

While it remains to be seen if second-year guard Avery Bradley will keep the starting job for the rest of the season, Allen has to prepare to adjust to a new role.

I dont think it can happen for me to ultimately be comfortable with these 11 or so games we have left because none of us are getting into routines as far as settling in and what are roles are, getting practice time, understanding rotations and chemistry, Allen said prior to the Celtics 103-79 win over the Philadelphia 76ers in which he scored 10 points in 28 minutes off the bench. You just adapt the best way you can.

It is not unusual for players in the point of Allens career to transition to the bench. Allen, though, is one of the best conditioned athletes in the league among any age group. When looking at the group of veterans on the Celtics, he seemed like the last to be moved to the reserves.

But Allen is realistic. He has conditioned his body to feel years younger than his actual age throughout his entire career. At the same time, he isnt going to force himself into a position in which he is not performing to his maximum abilities. This season he missed three games with a jammed left ankle and six with a sore right ankle.

I think my challenge is to be able to compete at a high level every year I come into a season, and that means competing for a starting job every opportunity I get, Allen said. Thats my focus and thats my goal. But if I felt as though I wasnt playing up to that level and those standards, then I think theres going to be a point where Id have to say its time for me to move on.

A lot has been talked about. Like, I keep myself in great shape but I dont want to do it to the point where Im running myself into the ground. I dont want to say, hey, 'I have no more left in me.' I want to be able to say, 'I have it left in me and I can walk away from it.'

The possibility of a new role goes beyond this season. Allen will become an unrestricted free agent this summer. When asked how many more years he thinks he can be a starter, Allen said that decision depends on the needs of the teams he signs with.

I think the team that I play on dictates that possibility, he said. I think thats really probably the bigger question.

The fact that Allen is discussing a new role on the bench is an example of the unpredictability of this NBA season. It is the first time in his career with the Celtics that he isnt playing alongside Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce, and Rajon Rondo in the starting unit -- I think I just emotionally try not to worry about it or look at it that way, he said -- another facet of the unexpected turn of events.

Honestly, you never know, Allen said when asked if he thought at the start of the season he would be discussing a move to the bench in April. You never look at it or rule anything out because there are so many possibilities. Like you go into a season, you never think about being traded. A lot of players that are in different situations, you end up with new area codes and with a new house you never thought youd live in. So that always throws you for a loop.

Around here, you have to be ready to adapt. One, you cant get comfortable, and two, youve got to be ready to adapt to whatever changes are thrown your way, whether its you get a new teammate, you get a new coach, you get anything around here. You have to be ready to adjust to it.

Facing so many uncertainties, being able to adjust is something Allen is certain about.

Francona misses second game this month because of health issues

Francona misses second game this month because of health issues

CLEVELAND -- Indians manager Terry Francona missed Tuesday night's game against Texas after his second trip to the hospital this month.

The Indians said doctors for now have ruled out major health issues and Francona will be monitored the next several weeks.

Francona, 58, left Monday night's game because he wasn't feeling well. He spent several hours at Cleveland Clinic and underwent a series of tests.

Francona was released from the hospital on Tuesday and spent the rest of the day at home. He was expected to return to the dugout Wednesday when the Indians host the Rangers. Cleveland lost to Texas 2-1 on Tuesday.

Bench coach Brad Mills ran the team in Francona's absence. Cleveland began the day in first place in the AL Central after rallying for a 15-9 win Monday.

"Tito actually wanted to come back to the ballpark today," team president Chris Antonetti said Tuesday. "I told him he can't come back to the ballpark today. He only got a couple hours of sleep last night, so despite his desire to want to be here, I thought it was best that he gets some rest tonight and just come back tomorrow. His plan when he was getting released from the hospital was to come over here."

"I don't think he was exceedingly happy with me," Antonetti said with a laugh. "That's OK."

Francona was hospitalized June 13 following a game at Progressive Field. He underwent tests and was released a few hours later, returning to work the following night. Last August, he missed a game after experiencing chest pains but was back the next day.

"Thankfully, we've got some great doctors that are coordinating his care," Antonetti said. "They've done every test they can possibly imagine. They've all come back clean. They're now working to try to figure out what are some of those things that are causing him to not feel so well."

Francona, a close friend of Mills for several years, has retained his sense of humor through his health issues.

A statement released by the team Tuesday read, "Mr. Francona also wanted to express that medical personnel have not yet ruled out an allergy to Bench Coach Brad Mills."