Campbell (foot) status up in the air for Monday night

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Campbell (foot) status up in the air for Monday night

BOSTON -- Gregory Campbell participated in an optional morning skate on Monday, but his coach wasnt quite ready to pronounce him ready for the Bs lineup against the Montreal Canadiens on Monday night.

Campbell has additional padding on his right skate boot and has skated for three days in a row including a pair with his Bs teammates and is feeling good. The center said he needed to speak with his coach and the trainers before he could say for certain whether he would be playing tonight.

I had the trainers punch out the skate a little bit, so it relieves a little bit of the pressure. If I play Im sure Ill put on a hard, protective pad or shield to protect me from getting hit again, said Campbell, who suffered the injury in the first period of the win over the Blue Jackets and played the rest of the game with a fracture in his left foot. Its a little sore when you take it out of the skate. It feels a little better in the skate when youre walking on it or putting a shoe on it. Walking is a little bit tougher than skating right now, but its funny how things go like that.

Campbells courageous attempt to play through pain means just one more question mark for the Bruins before tonights game. The Bruins are also waiting to hear whether or not Milan Lucic will be suspended for his hit from behind on Zac Rinaldo Saturday afternoon against the Flyers. Rich Peverley is also dinged up. He played very sparingly during the second and third period of the Flyers win with a nagging injury that caused him to miss Sundays full practice.

Julien said hell consult with the Bs trainers later on Monday afternoon and the team will make their final decisions on the lineup for Monday's clash with the Habs.

There are a lot of things we have to sort out and our lineup is probably one of the most uncertain ones weve had this year with a lot of different things, said Julien. We still have the Lucic thing with no answers on that yet. We also have a couple of players that are not questionable, but theyre players we have to make decisions on. So its really difficult for me to sit here and say that this guy is in and this guy is out.

If a guy is ready to go then theres no reason to hold him back. Then again, if a guy is still having issues Id have no problem holding him back.

Sounds like Campbell is best defined as a question mark in those conversations until otherwise noted. If he cant play then that leaves Zach Hamill once again centering the fourth line and Jordan Caron potentially available should Lucic get Shanabanned by the NHLs VP of Player Safety.

Friday, Feb. 24: 'Slap Shot' turns 40

Friday, Feb. 24: 'Slap Shot' turns 40

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while always holding a special place in my heart for Dickie Dunn as my favorite "Slap Shot" character. If Dickie Dunn wrote it, then it must be true.

*The ESPN hockey crew puts together some of their best scenes and favorite lines from "Slap Shot" as the movie hits 40 years old. I was first introduced to Slap Shot in my high school years and I liked it for the Hanson Brothers as much as for anything else, but that is a movie that just gets better and better every time I watch it. And I’ve watched it dozens and dozens of times. God bless Paul Newman for agreeing to lend his Hollywood star power to such a crazy, hilarious and raucous love letter to hockey.

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) Brian Wilde is recognizing the limitations of the Canadiens even under new coach Claude Julien.

*Bryan Bickell is stepping even closer to a return to the Carolina Hurricanes as he battles through his MS diagnosis.

*Kevin Shattenkirk apparently turned down a sign-and-trade with the Tampa Bay Lightning this season, and also turned down a chance to get dealt to the Edmonton Oilers last summer as well. I think the Blues D-man has a short list of teams he wants to sign with as a free agent, and neither one of those teams is on the list.

*Darren Dreger weighs in on Shattenkirk as well, and the price tag of a top prospect, first-round pick and NHL player for the puck-moving rental D-man seems very excessive.

*Things are coming to a head with Evander Kane and the Buffalo Sabres as he takes his play to a high level in Buff over the last few months.

*Interesting piece on Ed Snider’s daughter becoming an advocate for medicinal marijuana after his father’s health battles.

*For something completely different: Looks like a new season of "The Voice" coming our way.


 

'Why would the girls be treated any differently than the boys?'

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'Why would the girls be treated any differently than the boys?'

I grew up playing sports. For the most part I played soccer, but I also ran cross-country and track, I skied, snowboarded, and, at one point, I tried gymnastics. (It wasn't pretty.) My two younger sisters did the same. Our parents ran themselves ragged driving us to practices and tournaments, arranging carpools and fundraisers.

It never crossed our minds that we were girls playing sports. It's just what we did. And we loved it!

I didn't realize how lucky I was until visiting my grandparents in rural Ohio one summer. I found an old photo of their high school graduating class. I asked my grandmother what sports she played in school and I'll never forget her answer: "Oh, there were no sports for girls back then. We could cheer for the boys basketball team, but that was it."

I was shocked. I thought that was ridiculous. Why would the girls be treated any differently than the boys? I couldn't comprehend it.

Looking back, I'm so thankful I grew up in a time and environment where that wasn't the case. I can't imagine my life without sports. Not only because it's what I do for a living, but because playing sports throughout my childhood is a big part of what made me the person I am today.

Sports taught me the value of hard work. Being part of a team, I learned how to communicate and work with people to accomplish a common goal . . . and discovered just how gratifying the process can be. I became a teammate and leader who earned respect and empowered others. I made lasting friendships while stuffed like a sardine in a travel van singing Ace of Base at the top of my lungs. I wouldn't trade those experiences for anything. And I certainly wouldn't be in the position I'm in without them.

Don't get me wrong; it hasn't all been positive. Now that I'm a woman working in sports, I've had other kinds of eye-opening moments. During an interview for my first on-air job I was asked, in so many words, if this is really a career for me or if I had other plans after I found a husband. Once I did land a job, I covered many college football games by myself. There was one small school in particular whose players relentlessly catcalled me on the sidelines. I won't repeat the foul things they said, but I can tell you I went home feeling very dirty (and it wasn't because I  was pouring sweat after lugging a camera that weighed half as much as I did from end zone to end zone in the middle of an Alabama summer). Even now, every so often, social media has a special way of reminding me how some people still view women in sports. Surprise -- it's not good.

But if that's the worst I have to go through, I know I can't complain. My only focus is doing my job to the very best of my abilities and working as hard as I possibly can to continue to grow and get better. We've come a long way. I'm so grateful for those who blazed the trail and made it possible for me to do what I do. And, thanks to my grandmother, I will never take my opportunities for granted. My hope is that when my daughter grows up, she will be just as surprised and appalled by some of my bad experiences as I was talking to my grandmother that day.