Camby: Garnett is 'an intense player'

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Camby: Garnett is 'an intense player'

BOSTON -- In all of Marcus Camby's lengthy NBA career, Kevin Garnett still sets himself apart from any other player he has competed against. 
"Never, never in my 17 years (have I seen another player talk to himself)," Camby told CSNNE.com. "He's probably the first guy that does that."
The New York Knicks center entered the league in 1996, one year after Garnett. He has never heard someone have such vocal solo conversations as Garnett does. 
"I just thought he was an intense player," said Camby. "I just know that he's very hard and critical of himself and his game and wants to lead by example. You want guys like that on your team because he prides himself on being a great team guy."
He continued, "He just does a lot of talking. It's mainly just to get himself going and pump himself up. I don't know about all the other trash talking stuff that's being said out there, but when I've played against him, he was just talking to himself, just trying to get himself pumped up, and getting his teammates pumped up and they feed off his energy."
Garnett has gotten into the heads of many of his opponents, often times causing them to lose their focus and their composure. 
This month, he and Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony were involved in a heated situation in which Garnett reportedly made comments that riled Anthony during the game. Anthony was suspended one game for confronting Garnett both inside Madison Square Garden and by the team bus. 
Camby said even though players know what to expect going against Garnett, it can be easy to get lost in the intensity.
"You know it going into the ball game, but it's like you get caught up in the heat of the moment and the intensity of the game and the atmosphere of the crowd in the arena," he said. "Your juices get flowing, sometimes you tend to lose focus and forget that that's what he does. You just want to act off emotions instead of taking a hot second, calm yourself down a little bit, know that this is what it is, and go about your business."
When asked if Garnett's intense solo conversations have ever riled him, Camby quickly replied.
"Never, never, never," he said. "Never."

Clayborn beats out Seymour, Vrabel to enter Patriots Hall of Fame

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Clayborn beats out Seymour, Vrabel to enter Patriots Hall of Fame

Raymond Clayborn has been voted into the Patriots Hall of Fame, beating out both Mike Vrabel and Richard Seymour for the honor. The corner, who is tied for the franchise record for interceptions with Ty Law (36), will be the 26th person inducted to the Hall. 

Clayborn was a three-time Pro Bowler (1983, 1985, 1986) during his 13-year Patriots career from 1977 through 1989. He was drafted by the Patriots in the first round (16th overall) out of Texas in 1977, and chipped in both in the secondary and as a kick returner. As a rookie in the return game, he averaged 31 yards per return and brought back three for touchdowns. 

Clayborn reacted to the news on Twitter soon after the announcement was made. 

"I was fortunate to be a season ticket holder during Raymond's entire Patriots career," Patriots Chairman and CEO Robert Kraft said in a statement. "For the first half of his career, he teamed with Michael Haynes to form one of the best corner tandems in league history. Throughout his career, Raymond was a physical, shutdown corner.

"One of my favorite memories was watching the 1985 team advance to the Super Bowl after Raymond helped us break the Orange Bowl curse when he stymied future Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino with a dominant performance against Pro Bowl receivers Mark Duper and Mark Clayton. Raymond had six passes defensed and an interception to help us claim our first conference title. It was the greatest upset victory in franchise history at the time and one the entire New England region celebrated. It is a well-deserved honor and I look forward to presenting him his hall of fame jacket."

Clayborn has been a finalist for each of the last four years but was not able to generate enough support in the annual online vote to beat out Ty Law (2014 inductee), Willie McGinest (2015) or Kevin Faulk (2016). Clayborn was eligible to be voted in by the senior committee since he's now been retired for 25 years, but he did not receive the requisite eight of 10 senior committee votes to be elected in that way. 

As it turns out, he didn't need to be. When Kraft called Clayborn with the news, he said Clayborn received over 40 percent of the vote to beat out the pair of three-time Super Bowl champs.