Boston Red Sox

B's infuriated over Montreal fans cheering Chara's injury

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B's infuriated over Montreal fans cheering Chara's injury

MONTREAL Theres nothing like some old-fashioned hatred to get the Bruins back on their toes.

The hatred was, of course, directed at Zdeno Chara. In a show of blind audacity, the Bell Centre crowd stood and lustily cheered when Chara lay on the ice, injured, after being hit in the throat by a puck fired off the stick of Tomas Plekanec.

Plekanec showed his class and sportsmanship by checking immediately on Chara as soon as the 6-foot-9 defenseman was felled, but the Montreal fan base chose a different tact with raucous cheering. It was their idea of revenge for Chara's hit on Max Pacioretty last year, in which the Montreal forward suffered a severe concussion and fractured vertebrae in his neck when he was ridden into the stanchion. The NHL chose not to punish Chara, ruling it was a hockey play, but that didn't stop a period of near mass insanity in Montreal, which culminated in the police being pressured to investigate whether criminal charges should be brought. (They weren't.)

That incident, in and of itself, probably indicated where many Canadien followers reside on that fine line between being devoted fans or being a bloodthirsty mob severely in need of a reality check. When they gave Chara's injury a rousing standing ovation, it clinched the verdict.

And it infuriated the Bruins.

That was embarrassing," said Brad Marchand. "The fact that they were cheering like they did when Zee was hurt was classless."The normally stoic Chara didn't like it either even if he wasn't quite surprised.

"The way the fans react I cant control, but at the same time its not sportsmanlike and its disappointing, said Chara. When a guy is laying down on the ice hurting and theres a standing ovation for that . . . what can I say? There is nothing much I can say about it."

This is a fan base that, in the past, has a) booed the U.S. national anthem, b) rioted and burned police cruisers in "celebration" of a first-round playoff win over the Bruins in 2007-08, and c) flooded the 911 emergency line with calls after Chara's hit over Pacioretty. So over-the-top behavior is nothing new in Montreal.

But Marchand pointed out that there's a time and place for everything . . . and injuries aren't the time for that sort of rabid fandom to be on display.

Were out there trying to do a job," he said. "Its entertainment for them, but at the same time you have to be concerned that its peoples lives at stake. Concussions and stuff like that are a very serious thing, and you dont have to disrespect guys when theyre trying to make a living for their family and theyre hurt like that.

Eduardo Rodriguez's delivery wasn't the same after knee injury, until recently

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Eduardo Rodriguez's delivery wasn't the same after knee injury, until recently

BALTIMORE — If you suspected Eduardo Rodriguez’s knee created a residual effect with his mechanics as he struggled in the second half, you were correct. 

It was here in Baltimore on June 1 that Eduardo Rodriguez hurt his right knee, suffering another subluxation, which he’s prone to. Once he came back — a month and a half later, after the All-Star Break — his performances didn’t match the competency he’d shown pre-injury.

Through the first nine starts back, Rodriguez had a 5.47 ERA. He appeared clearly outside of the playoff rotation picture.

The last three outings have left a different impression, and are a product of improved mechanics. The Red Sox feel Rodriguez is lifting  right leg, his lead leg, higher now.

“I think Eddy’s regained more confidence physically over his last three starts,” pitching coach Carl Willis said. “We’ve seen a better delivery. Really since he had come back the injury here, a little bit of abbreviated leg lift. He finally got a little more confidence in picking that knee up and getting a little more drive from his lower half. I think that’s made a huge difference. He’s using his changeup more which is also a huge difference, but I think that lower half has allowed him to do that.”

Rodriguez has a 2.55 September ERA. He has strikeout ability that could be appealing in a postseason setting, but he’s young and inexperienced compared to Rick Porcello and Doug Fister. The fact he’s had confidence issues with his delivery could factor into how the Sox decide their playoff rotation, but his upside and strikeout potential are undeniable.

Rodriguez had a knee subluxation in 2016 that affected his mechanics for a time as well.

Branch on reduced role vs. Saints: "Ask Bill"

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Branch on reduced role vs. Saints: "Ask Bill"

FOXBORO - If Alan Branch is worried about his spot with the Patriots, he isn’t acting that way. A notorious slow starter, Branch played just six snaps in Sunday’s win at New Orleans. And to hear him talk, it’s business as usual.

“It’s not like you can practice 3 technique on a store clerk,” said Branch late Wednesday afternoon. When informed that he probably could if he wanted, Branch smiled and noted “you’d probably get arrested for that.”

All kidding aside, it was stark to see Branch’s ample behind stapled to the bench. He earned a two-year contract this offseason, and his presence on the interior has been critical to the defense’s success. But after getting pushed around a bit too often in that opening night loss to the Chiefs, Branch spent a lot more time watching then playing. Did he know that he wasn’t a big part of the plan?

“That’s another question you gotta ask Bill, man” said Branch. “That’s not something I can talk about.”

Branch has - at times - come off as nonchalant about the game. Wins, losses, big plays, no plays, none of it seems to change his demeanor. Knowing that, I asked him if he was frustrated by his lack of playing time.

“I mean every player wants to be on the field so it is what it is,” he responded. 

Does he think that he’ll be more involved Sunday against the Texans?

“I don’t know what they plan to do with me,” he said. “i just need to go in there and keep my head to the grindstone and work.”

That may be Bill Belichick’s plan: sitting the player to motivate him. It would also seem to be potentially the last resort, and with someone who clearly marches to the beat of his own drum, it’s unclear how he’ll respond.